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Africa's health worker crisis - an interview with Dr Peter Ngatia

AFRICA MEDICAL RESEARCH FOUNDATION (AMREF)
April 2009

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This interview with Dr Peter Ngatia, former faculty head at the Kenya Medical Training Centre, explores the critical lack of health workers of all levels throughout the continent of Africa and its implications. It also discusses programmes that have been set up to train community health workers to help provide at least minimum access to health care providers, particularly for rural communities

Quest for quality : interventions to improve human resources for health among faith-based organisations

ADJEI, George A
et al
February 2009

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"Traditionally, faith-based health organisations have been important health care providers in many remote and other under-serviced areas. Currently, these facilities bear the brunt of the competition for scarce human resources. It is important for faith-based organisations to learn from recent experiences and from the creative ways in which colleagues seek to retain their health workers and improve quality of human resource management. [As part of a]"...linking and learning programme, some faith-based umbrella organisations in Tanzania, Ghana, Uganda, and Malawi have joined forces to share their experiences in confronting the human resources crisis: by developing retention schemes, offering in-service training, task shifting, developing the planning and management skills of their staff, better coordination of salary and incentive structures with the public systems, and the development of lobbying instruments for national and international use"

The health worker shortage in Africa : are enough physicians and nurses being trained?

KINFU, Yohannes
et al
February 2009

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"The health worker shortage in sub-Saharan Africa derives from many causes, yet the dynamics of entry into and exit from the health workforce in many of these countries remain poorly understood. This limits the capacity of national governments and their international development partners to design and implement appropriate intervention programmes. This paper provides some of this information through the first systematic estimates of health worker inflow and outflow in selected sub-Saharan African countries"

Scaling up the stock of health workers : a review

DUSSAULT, Gilles
et al
2009

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This paper synthesises some of the published and grey literature on the process of scaling up the health workforce - also known as human resources for health (HRH) - with a particular focus on increasing the number of trained providers of health services. It concentrates on low- and middle-income countries, although some literature on richer countries is included

Report on the second expert consultation on increasing access to health workers in remote and rural areas through improved retention

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
2009

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This report presents a synthesis of the presentations and discussions held in plenary and working groups at the second full expert meeting of a WHO programme to increase access to health workers in remote and rural areas through improved retention. The provisional agenda, list of presentations, and the list of participants are given in thre three Annexes

Seizing the opportunity on AIDS and health systems

OOMMAN, Nandini
BERNSTEIN, Michael
ROSENZWEIG, Steven
August 2008

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This is a comparison of donor interactions with national health systems in Mozambique, Uganda, and Zambia - specifically: the health information systems, the supply chain systems for essential medicines, and human resources for health. It focuses on the US President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, and the World Bank’s Africa Multi-Country AIDS Program

World health report 2008|Primary health care : now more than ever

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
2008

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This report considers four sets of reforms that reflect a convergence between the values of primary health care, the expectations of citizens and the common health performance challenges that cut across all contexts. These include: universal coverage reforms, service delivery reforms, public policy reforms, and leadership reforms. "While universally applicable, these reforms do not constitute a blueprint or a manifesto for action. The details required to give them life in each country must be driven by specific conditions and contexts, drawing on the best available evidence"

Clinical care for sexual assault survivors : a multimedia training tool|A facilitators guide

INTERNATIONAL RESCUE COMMITTEE (IRC)
UCLA Center for International Medicine (UCLA CIM)
2008

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"The goal of this multimedia educational program is to improve clinical care for and general treatment of sexual assault survivors by providing medical instruction and encouraging competent, compassionate, confidential care. The program is intended for both clinical care providers and non-clinician health facility staff. It is designed to be delivered in a group setting with facilitators guiding participants through the material and directing discussions and group participation as appropriate
It is divided into five sections: 1. What Every Clinic Worker Needs to Know; 2. Responsibilities of Non-Medical Staff; 3. Direct Patient Care; 4. Preparing Your Clinic; 5. Forensic Examination. The first two are intended for a general (non-clinician) audience. Section 3 and Section 5 are intended for clinical care providers and contain graphic images inappropriate for untrained personnel. Section 4: Preparing Your Clinic is intended to guide participants through the process of assessing the current situation and developing an action plan for the improvement of services for sexual assault survivors
At the end of the DVD there is a section that contains key resources in PDF format, including the major source documents for this training as well as a copy of this facilitator’s guide"

Does shortening the training on integrated management of childhood illness guidelines reduce effectiveness? results of a systematic review|Final report

ROWE, Alexander K
et al
2008

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This comprehensive report presents the findings of a systematic review of the effectiveness of shortening Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) strategy training. The results are useful for NGOs and other national and international bodies working in the field of childhood illness
Health Policy and Planning (in press)

The Kampala declaration and agenda for global action

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
GLOBAL HEALTH WORKFORCE ALLIANCE
2008

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This resource contains both the Kampala declaration and an agenda for global action to "guide the initial steps in a coordinated global, regional and national response to the worldwide shortage and mal-distribution of health workers, moving towards universal access to quality health care and improved health outcomes. It is meant to unite and intensify the political will and commitments necessary for significant and effective actions to resolve this crisis, and to align efforts of all stakeholders at all levels around solutions"

Task shifting : rational redistribution of tasks among health workforce teams : global recommendations and guidelines

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
2008

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These guidelines and 22 recommendations are designed to support for countries that face a high HIV burden and acute shortages within the health workforce. Task shifting involves the rational redistribution of tasks among health workforce teams. Specific tasks are moved, where appropriate, from highly qualified health workers to health workers with shorter training and fewer qualifications in order to make more efficient use of the available human resources for health. The key elements that must be in place if the approach is to prove safe, efficient, effective, equitable and sustainable, cover the need for consultation, situation analysis and national endorsement, and for an enabling regulatory framework. They specify the quality assurance mechanisms, including standardised training, supportive supervision, and certification and assessment, that will be important to ensure quality of care

The medical peace work textbook

ROWSON, M
MELF, K
Eds
2008

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This textbook provides an introduction to medical peace work and includes chapters relating to human rights; the causes and health effects of war and violent conflict; how health workers can promote peace-building and reconstruction; and the health and well-being needs of refugees and immigrants. The book is aimed at doctors, nurses, public health workers and other health professionals, and students. This e-textbook is part of an online course on Medical Peace Work. The book can be consulted, downloaded, or printed for free without registering for the course

Guidelines: Incentives for health professionals

WELLER, Bridget
2008

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Staff costs dominate health services expenditure and ongoing shortages in the availability of health professionals present a real and direct threat to the continued delivery and development of health care services. Incentives, both financial and non-financial, provide one tool that governments and other employer bodies can use to develop and sustain a workforce with the skills and experience to deliver the required care. Financial incentives (wages and conditions, performance-linked payments and others) and nonfinancial incentives (career and professional development, workload management, flexible working arrangements, positive working arrangements and access to benefits and supports) are both discussed. The characteristics of an effective incentive scheme and the development of an incentive package are described. 

Developing human resources for health

DEUTSCHE GESELLSCHAFT FUR TECHNISCHE ZUSAMMENARBEIT (GTZ)
June 2007

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This booklet ..."describes the dire shortage of human resources (HR) in the health systems of low and middle income countries and the special challenges posed by this crisis. It touches on ways of addressing shortages of qualified staff and gives several examples of how countries can use technical support to build stronger a health workforce"

Infant and young child feeding in emergencies : operational guidance for emergency relief staff and programme managers

IFE Core Group
February 2007

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This document aims to provide concise, practical (but non-technical) guidance on how to ensure appropriate infant and young child feeding in emergencies. A number of elements are also applicable in non-emergency settings. It is intended for emergency relief staff, programme managers, national governments, United Nations agencies, NGOs and donors, and it applies to all countries. It includes six sections of practical steps, references, key contacts and definitions. Members of the IFE Core Group are: UNICEF, WHO, UNHCR, WFP, IFBAN-GIFA, CARE USA, Fondation Terre des hommes and Emergency Nutrition Network. It is also available in Arabic, Bahasa Indonesian, French, Portuguese and Spanish

Oral health manual

RANKIN, Sharon
LENNON, Marian
2007

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"This manual is written for health care workers with basic medical knowledge who want to know more about dental care and oral health it is intended to help them provide basic care and offer treatment in areas with limited resources and no dentist"

Human resource development for health in Ethiopia : challenges of achieving the millennium development goals

GIRMA, Samuel
et al
2007

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A "review of different documents on human resource for health in Ethiopia was undertaken. Generally there is shortage in number of different groups of professionals, maldistribution of professionals between regions, urban and rural setting, and governmental and non governmental/private organizations. A number of measures are being taken to alleviate these problems. The implications of these for human resource development by 2015 are explored briefly"

Attitudes of speech-language pathology students towards persons with disability

DHINGRA, Yatika
BHATNAGAR, Veethika
2006

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[Author's abstract] : Negative attitudes of health care professionals towards persons with disability are considered to be an invisible barrier towards rehabilitation and integration. In contrast, positive attitudes are a key to successful rehabilitation and integration. The attitudes of the professionals are influenced by education, knowledge about disabilities, years of experience working with individuals with disability, and the level and nature of staff training. The purpose of the study was to measure the attitudes of speech language pathology students towards persons with disability and to measure the favorable change, if any, in the attitude of these students towards persons with disability in the course of professional education. A sample of fifty-nine undergraduate and twenty postgraduate students was investigated using a Scale of Attitude Towards Disabled Persons (SADP). It was found that speech-language pathology students displayed a positive attitude towards persons with disability. The attitudes were formed by the time of entry into the educational programme and did not change significantly according to the academic years

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