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Healthcare provider's attitude towards disability and experience of women with disabilities in the use of maternal healthcare service in rural Nepal

DEVKOTA, Hridaya Raj
KETT, Maria
GROCE, Nora
MURRAY, Emily
June 2017

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BACKGROUND:
Women with disabilities are less likely to receive maternal healthcare services compared to women without disabilities. While few studies have reviewed healthcare experience of women with disabilities, no studies have been conducted to understand provider's attitude towards disability in Nepal, yet the attitude and behaviour of healthcare providers may have a significant influence on aspects of care and the use of service by women with disabilities. This study examines healthcare provider's attitudes towards disability and explores the experience of women with disabilities in maternal healthcare service utilization during pregnancy and childbirth.

METHOD:
The study used mixed method approach. An attitude survey was conducted among 396 healthcare providers currently working in public health facilities in Rupandehi district of Nepal. For additional insight, eighteen in-depth interviews with women with disabilities who used maternal healthcare services in a healthcare facility within the study district in their last pregnancy were undertaken. The Attitude Towards Disabled Persons (ATDP) scale score was used to measure the attitudes of healthcare providers. For quantitative data, univariate and multivariate analysis using ANOVA was used to understand the association between outcome and independent variables and qualitative analysis generated and described themes.

Reproductive Health, 2017

Bridging the gaps between research, policy and practice in low- and middle-income countries : a survey of health care providers

GUINDON, G Emmanuel
et al
May 2010

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This article discusses the results of a survey to examine the gaps that continue to exist between research based evidence and clinical practice. Health care providers in 10 low- and middle-income countries were surveyed about their use of research-based evidence and examined factors that may facilitate or impede such use. The conclusion is that locally conducted or published research plays an important role in changing the professional practice of health care providers surveyed in low- and middle-income countries and increased investments in local research, or at least in locally adapted publications of research-based evidence from other settings, are therefore needed. Although access to the Internet was viewed as a significant factor in whether research-based evidence led to concrete changes in practice, few respondents reported having easy access to the Internet. Therefore, efforts to improve Internet access in clinical settings need to be accelerate

Outreach workers training in rehabilitation

FRANCK, Bernard
2004

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This training manual was developed from an outreach worker training from physical rehabilitation centres (PRC) in Cambodia. The 100 hour training is divided into two parts: a theorical part organised in the PRC and a practical part organised in the field. Case studies, presentations and individual practical job training are provided in addition to pre and post tests to evaluate knowledge acquisition

Official, unofficial and informal fees for health care

KILLINGSWORTH, James R.
2002

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This discussion note re-explores the distinction between official, unofficial and informal fees to health workers and argues that unofficial and informal fees should be separated from official and formal fees. In considering these points, examples from reports about China, Bangladesh, and Central Asia/East Europe and the former Soviet Union are summarised and analysed

Improving provider-client communication : reinforcing IPC/C training in Indonesia and self-assessment and peer review

KIM, Y M
et al
2000

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Report of a study that tested the effectiveness of two low-cost alternatives to supervision (self-assessment and peer review) that may reinforce providers' skills after training. The performance of 3 groups of providers, who attend family planning clients was compared. Provider-client interactions were improved in the groups undergoing peer review or self-assessment, as was the level of facilitative communication. The level of information-giving was not improved in the control group or the groups undergoing peer review or self-assessment

Benchmark surveys on childhood immunization in Thailand, Nepal, Zimbabwe and Tanzania

PRINCETON SURVEY RESEARCH ASSOCIATES (PSRA)
1999

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Far fewer children than in the past are threatened by polio, diphtheria and measles thanks to the administration of basic vaccines through national immunization programmes. Nonetheless, a new generation of vaccines targeting other illnesses has not been as widely embraced. To begin to address this problem, surveys were undertaken of health care professionals, primarily pediatricians and general practitioners, and non-health care professionals, including health policy planners in the ministries of health and finance, officers at NGOs dealing with health issues, journalists who cover health care, academics and religious leaders, in Africa and Asia. This research was undertaken in order to develop a basic model of the decision making process that health professionals employ when considering whether to add vaccines to their national immunization programmes. This paper documents the findings of this exercise, and probes health workers' attitudes toward new vaccines in general, and toward the vaccines for Hib and rotavirus specifically

Human resources for health development journal (HRDJ)|an international journal for development of human resources for health

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This open access, online journal publishes papers on all aspects of planning, producing and managing human resources for health - all those who provide health services worldwide. As such, it conveys the quantitative and qualitative products of research and analysis, and seeks to address policy issues and foster policy debate. It invites contributions from users of health services as well as from academics, policy-makers and practitioners in the health realm and from disciplines - such as the behavioural sciences, economics, law, geography and management - that impinge on health and health development
Three times a year
Free (Online)

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