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Africa's health worker crisis - an interview with Dr Peter Ngatia

AFRICA MEDICAL RESEARCH FOUNDATION (AMREF)
April 2009

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This interview with Dr Peter Ngatia, former faculty head at the Kenya Medical Training Centre, explores the critical lack of health workers of all levels throughout the continent of Africa and its implications. It also discusses programmes that have been set up to train community health workers to help provide at least minimum access to health care providers, particularly for rural communities

Knowledge and utilization of information technology among health care professionals and students in Ile-Ife, Nigeria : a case study of a university teaching hospital

BELLO, I S
et al
2004

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The study was designed to assess the knowledge and utilization pattern of information technology among health care professionals and medical students in a university teaching hospital in Nigeria. Self-structured pretested questionnaires that probe into the knowledge, attitudes and utilization of computers and IT were administered to a randomly selected group of 180 health care professionals and medical students. Only 26% of the respondents possess a computer, and only a small percentage of the respondents demonstrated good knowledge of computers and IT

Health worker motivation and health sector reform

BENNETT, Sara
MILLER FRANCO, Lynne
March 2001

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This primer aims to provide a conceptual framework to help policy makers anticipate and plan for the effects of health sector reform on health worker motivation; summarise selected country experiences of the impact of health sector reform upon health worker motivation; and set out a number of basic rules which policy makers should take into account when developing and implementing reform policies so as to promote worker motivation

A comparison of graduates of an innovative medical school and a conventional school in relation to primary health care

AZIZ, Farouk Abdel
MALIK, Malik Bashir
August 1997

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A comparative study of the attitudes and performances of graduates from an innovative medical school and a conventional one in relation to primary health care (PHC) was conducted. The aim was to identify the impact of a community-oriented medical education. The results showed that both groups were aware of PHC but those of the innovative school had received practical training in PHC centres, had skills to approach solving community problems, and gave due emphasis to promotional and preventive aspects of patient management. The study concludes that a community-oriented medical education is more appropriate to community needs [Author's abstract]

Human resources for health development journal (HRDJ)|an international journal for development of human resources for health

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This open access, online journal publishes papers on all aspects of planning, producing and managing human resources for health - all those who provide health services worldwide. As such, it conveys the quantitative and qualitative products of research and analysis, and seeks to address policy issues and foster policy debate. It invites contributions from users of health services as well as from academics, policy-makers and practitioners in the health realm and from disciplines - such as the behavioural sciences, economics, law, geography and management - that impinge on health and health development
Three times a year
Free (Online)

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