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Bridging the gaps between research, policy and practice in low- and middle-income countries : a survey of health care providers

GUINDON, G Emmanuel
et al
May 2010

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This article discusses the results of a survey to examine the gaps that continue to exist between research based evidence and clinical practice. Health care providers in 10 low- and middle-income countries were surveyed about their use of research-based evidence and examined factors that may facilitate or impede such use. The conclusion is that locally conducted or published research plays an important role in changing the professional practice of health care providers surveyed in low- and middle-income countries and increased investments in local research, or at least in locally adapted publications of research-based evidence from other settings, are therefore needed. Although access to the Internet was viewed as a significant factor in whether research-based evidence led to concrete changes in practice, few respondents reported having easy access to the Internet. Therefore, efforts to improve Internet access in clinical settings need to be accelerate

The health worker shortage in Africa : are enough physicians and nurses being trained?

KINFU, Yohannes
et al
February 2009

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"The health worker shortage in sub-Saharan Africa derives from many causes, yet the dynamics of entry into and exit from the health workforce in many of these countries remain poorly understood. This limits the capacity of national governments and their international development partners to design and implement appropriate intervention programmes. This paper provides some of this information through the first systematic estimates of health worker inflow and outflow in selected sub-Saharan African countries"

Human resource development for health in Ethiopia : challenges of achieving the millennium development goals

GIRMA, Samuel
et al
2007

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A "review of different documents on human resource for health in Ethiopia was undertaken. Generally there is shortage in number of different groups of professionals, maldistribution of professionals between regions, urban and rural setting, and governmental and non governmental/private organizations. A number of measures are being taken to alleviate these problems. The implications of these for human resource development by 2015 are explored briefly"

Attitudes of speech-language pathology students towards persons with disability

DHINGRA, Yatika
BHATNAGAR, Veethika
2006

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[Author's abstract] : Negative attitudes of health care professionals towards persons with disability are considered to be an invisible barrier towards rehabilitation and integration. In contrast, positive attitudes are a key to successful rehabilitation and integration. The attitudes of the professionals are influenced by education, knowledge about disabilities, years of experience working with individuals with disability, and the level and nature of staff training. The purpose of the study was to measure the attitudes of speech language pathology students towards persons with disability and to measure the favorable change, if any, in the attitude of these students towards persons with disability in the course of professional education. A sample of fifty-nine undergraduate and twenty postgraduate students was investigated using a Scale of Attitude Towards Disabled Persons (SADP). It was found that speech-language pathology students displayed a positive attitude towards persons with disability. The attitudes were formed by the time of entry into the educational programme and did not change significantly according to the academic years

Displaced populations and long term humanitarian assistance

KETT, Maria
July 2005

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This article endeavours to give healthcare professionals contributing to humanitarian missions and projects in the acute phase of population displacement, an awareness of some of the factors that can influence the long term outcomes can be of great benefit for understanding project implications and sustainability

Knowledge and utilization of information technology among health care professionals and students in Ile-Ife, Nigeria : a case study of a university teaching hospital

BELLO, I S
et al
2004

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The study was designed to assess the knowledge and utilization pattern of information technology among health care professionals and medical students in a university teaching hospital in Nigeria. Self-structured pretested questionnaires that probe into the knowledge, attitudes and utilization of computers and IT were administered to a randomly selected group of 180 health care professionals and medical students. Only 26% of the respondents possess a computer, and only a small percentage of the respondents demonstrated good knowledge of computers and IT

When staff is underpaid : dealing with the individual coping strategies of health personnel

LERBERGHE, Wim Van
et al
2002

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'Health sector workers respond to inadequate salaries and working conditions by developing various individual ‘‘coping strategies’’ - some, but not all, of which are of a predatory nature. The paper reviews what is known about these practices and their potential consequences (competition for time, brain drain and conflicts of interest)....[It] argues that...Governments will need to recognize the dimension of the phenomenon and systematically assess the consequences of policy initiatives on the situation and behaviour of the individuals that make up their workforce'

Anthropological perspectives on injections : a review

REELER, A V
2000

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There is evidence that injections and injection equipment are now often used by lay people in developing countries. Epidemiological evidence links the large number of unsafe injections to serious bloodborne infections such as viral hepatitis b and c, and HIV. This article examines the reasons behind the demand for injections by consumers and the administration of unnecessary or unsafe injections by different types of provider. Interventions aimed at reducing the risk of unsafe injections are discussed in relation to cultural and social factors as well as those factors associated with health systems. Suggestions are made for approaches to the design of such interventions

A comparison of graduates of an innovative medical school and a conventional school in relation to primary health care

AZIZ, Farouk Abdel
MALIK, Malik Bashir
August 1997

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A comparative study of the attitudes and performances of graduates from an innovative medical school and a conventional one in relation to primary health care (PHC) was conducted. The aim was to identify the impact of a community-oriented medical education. The results showed that both groups were aware of PHC but those of the innovative school had received practical training in PHC centres, had skills to approach solving community problems, and gave due emphasis to promotional and preventive aspects of patient management. The study concludes that a community-oriented medical education is more appropriate to community needs [Author's abstract]

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