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Promoting young people's sexual and reproductive health : stigma, discrimination and human rights

WOOD, Kate
AGGLETON, Peter
2004

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Stigma, discrimination and the violation of human rights impact on people's experiences of sexual relationships, and on practitioners' and policy-makers' ability to promote young people sexual health. This resource sets out how stigma and discrimination influence sexual health, identifies some principles of good practice, and introduces examples of innovative and effective practice with young people from Africa, Asia, Central and Latin America

Upscaling Community Conversations in Ethiopia 2004 : unleashing capacities of communities for the HIV/AIDS response

UNITED NATIONS DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME
2004

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This document focuses on the Community Conversations (CC) process - a component of UNDP's Leadership for Results Programme - in Ethiopia, and outlines both key aspects of the methodology and key results from its implementation in Alaba, SNNPR and Yabelo, Oromiya. The approach, using the expertise of skilled facilitators, aims to encourage people to talk openly to each other about the implications of HIV and AIDS in their communities, and to rethink cultural norms, community values and health behaviours in their relations to the disease. Some early results from Community Conversations include: communities taking responsibility for their own prevention; communities discontinuing traditional practices found to be harmful in the context of HIV and AIDS; communities able to influence local governments; communities using their own social resources to support children affected by AIDS, and orphans in particular; communities sharing their learning with other communities. The document outlines a strategy for upscaling community conversations, and looks in particular at issues around implementation and coordination, funding and mechanisms to address needs that may be identified during the CC process

Rehabilitation for persons with traumatic brain injuries

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
et al
2004

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This manual is intended for mid-level rehabilitation workers and primary health care personnel as an educational and instructional tool to use for their work with persons who have sustained traumatic brain injury (TBI), their families and members of their communities including teachers and their potential employers. Drawings are provided to help clarify safety guides, training instructions and the steps involved in making specific adaptive devices

Sexuality and relationships education for people with down syndrome

WOOD, Mandy
2004

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"This article describes why Sexuality and Relationships Education (SRE) as part of the school curriculum is especially important for individuals with Down syndrome and how parents and professionals can work together to ensure that it is delivered effectively"
Down Syndrome News and Update 4(2)

Reducing stigma and discrimination related to HIV and AIDS : training for health care workers. Trainer's manual

ENGENDERHEALTH
Ed
2004

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This manual is aimed at reducing stigma and discrimination in health care settings. Health workers' fears are based on real risks of medical transmission, due to lack of information and training and poor precaution practices. This manual uses participatory training methodologies to change health care workers' attitudes and provide practical information around patient rights and safe work environment. It covers a broad range of topics, including: stigma and discrimination, right to privacy and confidentiality, HIV transmission, standard precaution practices, post-exposure prophylaxis, and HIV testing

Working positively : a guide for NGOs managing HIV/AIDS in the workplace

UK CONSORTIUM ON AIDS AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT
December 2003

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With HIV prevalence rates of over 20% in many sub-Saharan African countries, and with infection rates rising rapidly in other parts of the world, NGOs are funding that HIV/AIDS is affecting not only programme work but also staff. If NGOs are to be credible in these communities, they need to be seen to be addressing HIV/AIDS internally in a way that is consistent with their external messages. However, developing a workable comprehensive solution that covers policy, education and prevention, and treatment and care is not easy. This guide looks at the key issues involved in developing a workplace strategy and how different NGOs and commercial organisations are approaching these issues through a series of case studies. It also provides a guide to the key components of a successful strategy and a list of useful reference documents

Working positively : a guide for NGOs managing HIV/AIDS in the workplace

UK CONSORTIUM ON AIDS AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT
December 2003

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With HIV prevalence rates of over 20% in many sub-Saharan African countries, and with infection rates rising rapidly in other parts of the world, NGOs are funding that HIV/AIDS is affecting not only programme work but also staff. If NGOs are to be credible in these communities, they need to be seen to be addressing HIV/AIDS internally in a way that is consistent with their external messages. However, developing a workable comprehensive solution that covers policy, education and prevention, and treatment and care is not easy. In a series of documents in both PDF and MSWord formats, this guide looks at the key issues involved in developing a workplace strategy and how different NGOs and commercial organisations are approaching these issues through a series of case studies. It also provides a guide to the key components of a successful strategy

Take care of those you love|Namibia

ASINO, Elina
NATANGWE, Kamati Samwel
September 2003

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This is one of a series of easy-to-read booklets developed for a series of gender-sensitive workshops aimed at communicating messages on HIV and AIDS to poor, rural people, particularly illiterate women and out-of-school girls. Each booklet contains an illustrated story and some questions for discussion

Educate a woman, educate a nation|Namibia

GAROSAB, Gerson D
September 2003

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This is one of a series of easy-to-read booklets developed for a series of gender-sensitive workshops aimed at communicating messages on HIV and AIDS to poor, rural people, particularly illiterate women and out-of-school girls. Each booklet contains an illustrated story and some questions for discussion

Mainstreaming HIV/AIDS using a community-led rights-based approach : a case study of ACORD Tanzania

AMOATEN, Susan
August 2003

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This is a case study produced by ACORD in Tanzania. It examines the process and effects of a series of initiatives and interventions designed with the aim of creating an "AIDS-competent" society. The interventions used a rights-based approach; involving the three principles of accountability, empowerment and participation. The study gives the background to ACORD's work in Tanzania, discusses programmes in Karagwe (a semi-rural area) and Mwanza (an urban shanty area) and then examines the characteristics common to both programmes. The programmes include such elements as gender relations, legal rights, micro-credit and income generation opportunities and anti-discrimination and -marginalisation strategies. The programmes worked closely with and reinforced already-existing local structures, such as village tribal committees or semi-official "Street Committees"

Fifty years of development communication : what works

WAISBORD, Silvio
July 2003

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This presentation gives an overview of what works in participatory communication based on the experience of the past 50 years. It looks at an 'alphabet soup' of approaches in development communication, provides some definitions and discusses some common misconceptions about communication in development. There have been some changes in the practice of development communication which are noted. There are then some case studies looking at different interventions, followed by five key ideas on what works in development communication

The wicked healer|Namibia

SHATILWEH, Rosalia Nailonga
ISAI, Aindongo
July 2003

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This is one of a series of easy-to-read booklets developed for a series of gender-sensitive workshops aimed at communicating messages on HIV and AIDS to poor, rural people, particularly illiterate women and out-of-school girls. Each booklet contains an illustrated story and some questions for discussion

Efficiency in reaching the millennium development goals

JAYASURIYA, Ruwan
WODON, Quentin
June 2003

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This study deals with the MDG-related topic of increasing the efficiency of countries in producing good outcomes with their available resources. The first two papers use country-level data to look at the efficiency of countries in improving health, education, and GDP outcomes. The last two use within-country data on health and education in Argentina and Mexico to look at the same issues. The analysis helps quantify how much progress could be achieved through better efficiency, and to some extent, how efficiency itself could be improved

Who is the real chicken?|Namibia

KAHIVERE, Walter
February 2003

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This is one of a series of easy-to-read booklets developed for a series of gender-sensitive workshops aimed at communicating messages on HIV and AIDS to poor, rural people, particularly illiterate women and out-of-school girls. Each booklet contains an illustrated story and some questions for discussion

Education and HIV/AIDS : a sourcebook of HIV/AIDS prevention programmes

WORLD BANK. Education Team
2003

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Education sectors of affected countries are playing an increasingly important role in the fight against HIV/AIDS. This sourcebook aims to support efforts by countries to strengthen the role of the education sector in the prevention of HIV/AIDS. It provides concise summaries of programmes around Africa, highlighting the main elements of the programme as well as what lessons can be learned from them

Succession planning in Uganda : early outreach for AIDS-affected children and their families

HORIZONS
2003

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This summary paper describes and discusses a survey into the effects and outcomes of a succession planning programme. It discusses the background, context and methodology of the survey, before presenting the key findings. The key findings are as follows: the proportion of HIV+ parents who appointed a guardian increased significantly after exposure to the SP programme; after two years in the programme, parents were more likely to have disclosed their serostatus to at least one child; will writing doubled in the group but remained low; standby guardians appointed were mostly male, however, ultimately women assume the responsibility

The sound of silence : difficulties in communicating on HIV/AIDS in schools

BOLER, Tania
et al
2003

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This report describes the difficulties in communicating on HIV/AIDS in schools. It includes experiences from India and Kenya, and reports the findings of a survey carried out by ActionAid researchers in both countries in 2002. The research examines parental demand for HIV/AIDS education. It then explroes teh role that schools have in meeting this demand and other sources that young people might use to learn about HIV and AIDS. The final section places HIV/AIDS communication in the wider context of a crisis in education in resource-poor settings, and highlights some of the barriers or silences in communication around HIV/AIDS. Among its conclusions is the suggestion that HIV/AIDS education be placed in the context of the community

Increasing client participation in family planning consultations : 'smart patient' coaching in Indonesia

MI KI, Young
et al
2003

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This is a report of the study 'Operations research: impact of client communication training on client participation and contraceptive continuation in Indonesia'. Family planning clients were given a brief training session to improve their communication skills before seeing a service provider. The findings show that women agreed that coaching helped them to gain confidence, ask more questions and express their concerns. Providers were more likely to tailor information to individual needs. Eight months following the intervention, clients were more likely to continue to use a contraceptive method

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