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Mental health funding and the SDGs What now and who pays?

MACKENZIE, Jessica
KESNER, Christie
May 2016

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"This report provides an overview of who is currently funding mental health and who isn’t, but could be. It is a synthesis of research previously conducted in this field and analyses both existing and new funders. It highlights how little information there is on what donors are spending on mental health globally, what types of activities are funded and why funding mental health delivers a variety of benefits, and it suggests how to frame the issue to encourage more investment".

Health financing country diagnostic: a foundation for national strategy development

MCINTYRE, Diane
KUTZIN, Joseph
2016

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Health systems’ analysis is not an exact science in the sense that it is not a case of calculating an indicator and comparing that to a target that is set in stone. Instead, the analysis rests on describing elements of the existing system and critically assessing this on the basis of a clear understanding of health financing policy, the objectives associated with UHC, and relevant comparisons with and lessons from other countries. The paper attempts to provide guidance on how this can be done by highlighting the key issues that should be considered and some of the specific questions that should be addressed. It is not intended to provide a strict chapter-bychapter outline for a system assessment, but instead to foster and guide a systematic approach to the analysis of the health financing system. The health financing country diagnostic is written for Ministries of Health, advisors and others actors responsible for developing and implementing health financing policies, and provides step-by-step guidance on how to undertake a situation analysis of a country’s health financing system. Topics considered include: key contextual factors that influence health financing policy and attainment of policy goals; overview of health expenditure patterns; review of health financing arrangements; analysis UHC goals and intermediate objectives; and overall assessment - priorities for health financing reform.

The economic lives of people with disabilities in Vietnam

PALMER, M
GROCE, N
MONT, D
NGUYEN, O H
MITRA, S
July 2015

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Through a series of focus group discussions conducted in northern and central Vietnam, this study gives voice to the lived economic experience of families with disabilities and how
they manage the economic challenges associated with disability. The dynamic of low and unstable income combined with on-going health care and other disability-related costs
gives rise to a range of coping mechanisms (borrowing, reducing and foregoing expenditures, drawing upon savings and substituting labour) that helps to maintain living standards
in the short-run yet threatens the longer-term welfare of both the individual with disability and their household. Current social protection programs were reported as not accessible to
all and while addressing some immediate economic costs of disability, do not successfully meet current needs nor accommodate wider barriers to availing benefits.

Can households cope with health shocks in Vietnam?

MITRA, S
PALMER, M
MONT, D
GROCE, N
May 2015

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"This paper investigates the economic impact of health shocks on working-age adults in Vietnam during 2004-2008, using a fixed effects specification. Health shocks cover disability and morbidity and are measured by 'days unable to carry out regular activity', 'days in bed due to illness/injury', and 'hospitalization'. Overall, Vietnamese households are able to smooth total non-health expenditures in the short run in the face of a significant rise in out-of-pocket health expenditures. However, this is accomplished through vulnerability-enhancing mechanisms, especially in rural areas, including increased loans and asset sales and decreased education expenditures. Female-headed and rural households are found to be the least able to protect consumption. Results highlight the need to extend and deepen social protection and universal health coverage."

Moving towards universal health coverage: health insurance reforms in nine developing countries in Africa and Asia

Lagomarsion G.
Garabrant A.
Adyas A.
Otoo N.
Muga R.
et al
September 2012

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The implementation of national health insurance reforms designed to move towards universal health coverage by 9 low-income and lower-middle-income countries in Africa and Asia  is reported. Five countries at intermediate stages of reform (Ghana, Indonesia, the Philippines, Rwanda, and Vietnam) and four at earlier stages (India, Kenya, Mali, and Nigeria) are considered. These countries’ approaches to raising prepaid revenues, pooling risk, and purchasing services are described using the functions-of-health-systems framework. Their progress across three dimensions of coverage: who, what services, and what proportion of health costs is assessed using the coverage-box framework. Patterns in the structure of these countries’ reforms including use of tax revenues to subsidise target populations and steps towards broader risk pools are identified. Trends in progress towards universal coverage, including increasing enrolment in government health insurance and a movement towards expanded benefits packages are reported. Common, comparable indicators of progress towards universal coverage are needed.

Universal coverage of health services: tailoring its implementation

CARRIN, Guy
MATHAUER, Inke
XU, Ke
EVANS, David
2008

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In 2005, the Member States of WHO adopted a resolution encouraging countries to develop health financing systems capable of achieving and/or maintaining universal coverage of health services – where all people have access to needed health services without the risk of severe financial consequences. In doing this, a major challenge for many countries will be to move away from out-of-pocket payments, which are often used as an important source of fund collection. Prepayment methods will need to be developed or expanded but, in addition to questions of revenue collection, specific attention will also have to be paid to pooling funds to spread risks and to enable their efficient and equitable use. Developing prepayment mechanisms may take time, depending on countries’ economic, social and political contexts. Specific rules for health financing policy will need to be developed and implementing organizations will need to be tailored to the level that countries can support and sustain. In this paper we propose a comprehensive framework focusing on health financing rules and organizations that can be used to support countries in developing their health financing systems in the search for universal coverage.

Cost-effectiveness analysis in health. A practical approach (2nd edition)

MUENNIG, Peter
BOUNTHAVONG, Mark
2008

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Cost-effectiveness analysis is used to evaluate medical interventions worldwide, in both developed and developing countries. This book provides process-specific instruction in a concise, structured format to provide a robust working knowledge of common methods and techniques. Each chapter includes real-world examples and tips that highlight key information. Calculations concerning disability life adjusted years are covered. The third edition contains new discussion on meta-analysis and advanced modelling techniques and a long worked example.

Protecting households from catastrophic health spending

Xu Ke
David B. Evans
Guido Carrin
Ana Mylena Aguilar-Rivera
Philip Musgrove
Timothy Evans
et al
July 2007

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Many countries rely heavily on patients’ out-of-pocket payments to providers to finance their health care systems. This prevents some people from seeking care and results in financial catastrophe and impoverishment for others who do obtain care.  Data from a large data set (116 surveys covering 89 countries) provided global estimates of the extent of catastrophic spending and impoverishment associated with out-of-pocket payments. Prepayment mechanisms protect people from financial catastrophe, but no strong evidence is reported that social health insurance systems offer better or worse protection than tax-based systems. Health system and population characteristics associated with high levels of catastrophic spending are examined to provide a basis for assessing the policy options available to reduce the incidence of financial catastrophe

 

 

Violence and abuse against women with disabilities in Malawi

HOEM KVAM, Marit
HELLUM BRAATHEN, Stine
November 2006

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This is a case study of violence and sexual abuse towards women with disabilities in Malawi. It is based on in-depth interviews and focus group discussions. This work examines the childhood and adult experiences of these women, and asserts that discrimination, stigma and vulnerability is worse for adult women.It claims that improvements to access and education will lead to empowerment, thus improving the overall quality of life that women with disabilities can enjoy. This work would be useful for anyone with an interest in human/ women's rights and disability

Towards well-being for Afghans with disability : the health challenge

BAKHSHI, Parul
TRANI, Jean-Francois
2006

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This report is part of the National Disability Survey in Afghanistan. It aims to identify the number of Afghans with a disability, the barriers they face, and their access to rehabilitation services and other health provision. This report is inclusive of the needs of people with psycho-social disabilities and represents the first steps toward developing a systemic approach to health and disability provision in Afghanistan

Disease control priorities in developing countries. 2nd edition. Chapter 2. Intervention cost-effectiveness: overview of main messages.

LAXMINARAYAN, Ramanan
et al
2006

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Drawing from the collective knowledge and analytical work of the many experts who have contributed to this volume, this chapter provides a broader perspective on the relative efficiency and effect on health of a number of interventions than is possible in a single, condition-specific chapter. The objective is to provide information on the cost-effectiveness estimates for 319 interventions covering nearly every disease condition considered in the volume, and the resulting avertable burden of disease. This chapter provides broad conclusions on the economic efficiency of using these interventions to improve health.

 

Disease control priorities in developing countries. 2nd edition. Chapter 15. Cost-effectiveness analysis for priority setting.

MUSGROVE, Phillip
FOX-RUSHBY, Julia
2006

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What cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) does and does not provide, how it is related to the concept of burden of disease, and how it can be used, along with other criteria, in setting priorities is discussed. The several meanings of the term CEA and the way that interventions are classified and evaluated are described. Estimating the effectiveness of an intervention requires specifying the units which in turn requires choices of several parameter values, including, in the analyses reported here, the discount rate applied to future years; the disability weights that describe the severity of diseases and conditions, corresponding to the health losses that they cause; and the life expectancy at different ages. Costs of interventions to include in the analysis, and conversion of costs to equivalents in U.S. dollars for international comparisons are described. Variations of results and uncertainty of estimates are discussed. Two ways are suggested to consider costs and outcomes at the population level, allowing for large differences among countries in the size of population; the incidence or prevalence of a disease, condition, or risk factor; and the amount spent or available to spend on an intervention

Women with disabilities: accessing trade

STIENSTRA, Deborah
et al
July 2004

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This resource examines how trade policy and the cost of health services and products further economically marginalize women with disabilities. The authors outline how a similar phenomenon leads to lack of access due to higher costs of goods that are imported from the US. This resource also includes a set of recommendations for government and private sector organisations. This work would be useful for anyone with an interest in women's rights, disability and trade issues

Financial resources for HIV/AIDS programmes in low and middle income countries over the next five years

JOINT UNITED NATIONS PROGRAMME ON HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS)
November 2002

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This report includes updated information on the costs of responding to HIV and AIDS in developing countries and on the progress in tracking expenditures and mobilising new resources for the response. It gives information on the financial resources required for a credible response to the epidemic and on global progress towards achieving the necessary level of support. It summarises the key interventions required to achieve the overall goals laid out in the Declaration of Commitment on HIV and AIDS and their related costs. It also includes estimates on the current coverage of those interventions, estimates of financial resources available at the time and elaborates on areas where a consensus is needed for an effective cost-sharing of the global response. It briefly describes a multi-stakeholder response mobilisation strategy

WHO global strategy for containment of antimicrobial resistance

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
2001

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This strategy provides a framework of interventions to stimulate the prevention of infection, to slow the emergence of resistance and to reduce the spread of resistant microorganisms, in order to reduce the impact of resistance on health and health care costs, while improving access to existing agents and encouraging the development of new agents

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