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New sign language new(S): the globalization of sign language in the smartphone era

TANNENBAUM-BARUCHI, Caroline
FEDER-BUBIS, Paula
October 2017

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"Languages are dynamic and change over the years. Changes in sign languages have been usually initiated to accommodate the needs of the local Deaf community. With the increase in smartphone use, sign languages are influenced not only by the local Deaf community, but also by foreign Deaf people on the other side of the screen, regardless of their location. Smartphones influence the sign language itself and the Deaf community by connecting different communities of Deaf people through messages, shared information and experiences, and news delivery. The popularity of this technology among Deaf communities is a social phenomenon emerging from Deaf people themselves. Smartphones may promote the globalization of sign language, shortening distances between Deaf communities around the world"

Disability & Society, Volume 33, 2018 - Issue 2

Human development report 2013|The rise of the south : human progress in a diverse world

MALIK, Khalid
et al
2013

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This report "examines the profound shift in global dynamics driven by the fast-rising new powers of the developing world and its long-term implications for human development....The report identifies four specific areas of focus for sustaining development momentum: enhancing equity, including on the gender dimension; enabling greater voice and participation of citizens, including youth; confronting environmental pressures; and managing demographic change

Citizenship education through an ability expectation and "ableism" lens : the challenge of science and technology and disabled people

WOLBRING, Gregor
September 2012

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"Citizenship education has been debated for some time and has faced various challenges over time. This paper introduces the lens of "ableism" and ability expectations to the citizenship education discourse. The author contends that the cultural dynamic of ability expectations and ableism (not only expecting certain abilities, but also perceiving certain abilities as essential) was one factor that has and will continue to shape citizenship and citizenship education. It focuses on three areas of citizenship education: (a) active citizenship; (b) citizenship education for a diverse population; and (c) global citizenship. It covers two ability-related challenges, namely: disabled people, who are often seen as lacking expected species-typical body abilities, and, advances of science and technology that generate new abilities. The author contends that the impact of ability expectations and ableism on citizenship and citizenship education, locally and in a globalized world, is an important and under-researched area"
Education Science, Vol 2, Issue 3

World health report 2008|Primary health care : now more than ever

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
2008

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This report considers four sets of reforms that reflect a convergence between the values of primary health care, the expectations of citizens and the common health performance challenges that cut across all contexts. These include: universal coverage reforms, service delivery reforms, public policy reforms, and leadership reforms. "While universally applicable, these reforms do not constitute a blueprint or a manifesto for action. The details required to give them life in each country must be driven by specific conditions and contexts, drawing on the best available evidence"

Globalization and social determinants of health : the role of the global marketplace (part 2 of 3)

LABONTÉ, Ronald
SCHRECKER, Ted
June 2007

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In this second article, several, often interacting clusters of pathways leading from globalisation to changes in social determinants of health that are relevant to health equity, are identified and described. These involve: trade liberalisation; the global reorganisation of production and labour markets; debt crises and economic restructuring; financial liberalisation; urban settings; influences that operate by way of the physical environment; and health systems changed by the global marketplace

Globalization and social determinants of health : health equity in global governance (part 3 of 3)

LABONTÉ, Ronald
SCHRECKER, Ted
June 2007

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Interventions to reduce health inequities by way of social determinants of health are inextricably linked with social protection, economic management and development strategy. Reflecting this insight, and against the background of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), this article focuses on the asymmetrical distribution of gains, losses and power that is characteristic of globalisation in its current form and identifies a number of areas for innovation on the part of the international community

Towards equality : creation of the disability movement in Central Asia

KATSUI, Hisayo
2005

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This study looks at a political approach to civic activism in the field of disability, which is an approach that the two fields of development studies and disability studies have begun to focus on as a driving force for susatinable structural change.
The findings in the study are based on interviews conducted with Central Asian disabled people. Three main findings emerged: a vulnerability creation mechanism for disabled people, the heterogeneity of disabled people and the implications for equality

Human development report 2005 : international cooperation at a crossroads. Aid, trade and security in an unequal world

WATKINS, Kevin
2005

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The 2005 report takes stock of human development, including progress towards the MDGs. Looking beyond statistics, it highlights the human costs of missed targets and broken promises. Extreme inequality between countries and within countries is identified as one of the main barriers to human development and as a powerful brake on accelerated progress towards the MDGs. The report argues that poverty and inequality need urgent attention. It gives a comparison of life expectancy in various countries and puts forward a case that the response from the international community to HIV/AIDS pandemic has been lacking. The report indicates that child mortality has been on the rise compared to the 1980s when the trend had been reversed

Information and communication technologies and the effects of globalization : twenty-first century digital slavery for developing countries -- myth or reality?

OGUNSOLA, L A
2005

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This paper examines the ICT (Information and Communication Technology) revolution and the concept of globalization as they effect developing countries. The wide gap in availability and use of ICTs across the world and the influences ICTs exert on globalization at the expense of developing countries are carefully examined and suggestions and necessary policies are offered for developing countries to leap-frog the industrialization stage and transform their economies into high value-added information economies that can compete with the advanced countries on the global market. This is why it is important for Africa, in general, and Nigeria, in particular, to be aware of the implications, prepare to avoid the most telling consequences and prepare to meet its challenges

World youth report 2003 : the global situation of young people

UNITED NATIONS. Department for Economic and Social Affairs
Ed
2004

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Overall, young people today are better off than previous generations, but many are still severely hindered by a lack of education, poverty, health risks, unemployment and the impact of conflict. The World Youth Report 2003 provides an overview of the global situation of young people. The first ten chapters focus on the priority areas of education, employment, extreme poverty, health issues, the environment, drugs, delinquency, leisure time, the situation of girls and young women, and youth participation in decision-making as identified by the World Programme of Action for Youth (WPAY) adopted by the General Assembly in 1995. The remaining five chapters address some of the newer issues that were later identified as additional priorities for youth and were adopted by the United Nations Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) in 2003

Human development report 2004 : cultural liberty in today's diverse world

FUKUDA-PARR, Sakiko
et al
2004

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This Human Development Report focuses how development work can help build inclusive, culturally diverse societies -- both as a means to achieving other, more traditional development priorities, and as an end in itself. It examines and rejects the claim that cultural differences lead to social, economic and political conflict, and that cultural rights supercede political or economic rights (eg the right to education). The report acknowledges the importance of legislative recognition of diverse cultural backgrounds, but stipulates that, to achieve real change, political culture has to change as well: people need to think , feel and act in a way that respects and values the needs of others. Finally, it considers the threats and opportunities presented by globalisation, in terms of the intellectual property of indigenous people; cultural goods markets; and emerging and established multicultural societies

IPR, innovation, human rights and access to drugs : an annotated bibliography

VELASQUEZ, Germán
VIDAL, Jaume
2003

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This annotated bibliography brings together references to scientific, legal and other materials on globalisation, patents and drugs. It is organised into sections on general articles (basic literature on the topic), country studies (by region), thematic sections on TRIPS (the World Trade Organization treaty on patents) and patents, drug research and development, and human rights and access to drugs. Finally a section on electronic information sources highlights useful websites and discussion groups on these issues. Each reference includes full bibliographic information and a thorough, descriptive abstract detailing the key points of each item

World health report 2003 : shaping the future

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
2003

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This report argues that real progress in health depends on strengthening health systems, centred on the principles of primary health care. This requires effective use of existing knowledge and technologies and innovation to create new health tools, along with appropriate structures and strategies to apply them. Success will need new forms of cooperation between international health agencies, national health leaders, health workers and communities, and other relevant sectors. Chapter 1 of the report looks at the current state of global health, highlighting the gap between the poor and better-off everywhere. Chapter 2 reflects on the slow progress towards achieving the Millenium Development Goals. Chapter 3 looks at the HIV/AIDS pandemic, and demonstrates why HIV/AIDS control needs to drive the agenda for the global health community. Chapter 4 looks at the steps needed to achieve polio eradication within the next few years, and chapter 5 concentrates on the lessons learned from the SARS outbreak. The theme of chapter 6 is the the overlap between communicable and non-communicable diseases and injuries occurring throughout the developing world, leading to a crisis of priorities for health systems. The concluding chapter returns to the statement that stronger health systems are necessary, and that strengthening health systems should be based on the principles and practices of primary health care

CBR works best the way local people see it and build it

MILES, M
January 2003

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"The growth in availability of practical information by which people may manage disability in home and local community, and some problems of transmission and cultural adaptation, are reviewed. There is a growing menace of simplistic globalised packages, promoted by deeply confused 'flying experts', ignoring or dismissing the indigenous concepts, knowledge and skills that are essential to success in disability service innovation"
Asia Pacific Disability Rehabilitation Journal, Vol 14, No 1

25 questions & answers on health & human rights

NYGREN-KRUG, Helena
July 2002

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This publication explores the complex relationship between health and human rights issues. It discusses 25 key questions relating to this topic, such as: the links between health and human rights law; the meaning of "the right to health"; international governmental commitments and monitoring mechanisms; ethical issues; the impact of globalization

Globalisation guide

AUSTRALIAN ASIA PACIFIC ECONOMIC COOPERATION (APEC) STUDY CENTRE
2002

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The Globalisation Guide is a resource for students, presenting the arguments of both those who believe globalisation is a force for good and those who believe it is a force for evil. The Australian Apec Study Centre believes it is a force for good, based on the experience of the countries in the Asia-Pacific, where the freeing of trade and integration of economies has brought improvement in prosperity. However, globalisation is a product of capitalism, which undeniably produces losers as well as winners. The development of capitalism will inevitably generate controversy. The guide looks at both sides of the argument, and tries to answer key questions like what is globalisation and when did it start; who are the key players; how does globalisation affect culture; is there an alternative. The guide also provides links to dozens of other websites both pro and anti globalisation

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