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Triple jeopardy : tackling the discrimination facing girls and women with leprosy

GRIFFEY, Harriet
Eds
March 2015

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This report examines the triple discrimination situation faced by women and girls with leprosy in developing countries, because of their gender, the disabilities that can result from the disease and the impact of its stigma. Studies also show that in some countries they are less likely than men to be diagnosed early, and so are at greater risk of developing a lifelong disability. This report shows what can be done to achieve access to treatment and a better outcome for girls and women affected by leprosy

The gap report

THE JOINT UNITED NATIONS PROGRAMME ON HIV AND AIDS (UNAIDS)
July 2014

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The goal of this report is to provide the best possible data on the global AIDS epidemic, with a particular focus on information and analysis on the people left behind. The report highlights these gaps firstly in regional terms, providing “Regional Snapshots” and then explores issues faced by the following 12 populations that have been left behind by the AIDS response: people living with HIV, adolescent girls and young women, prisoners, migrants, people who inject drugs, sex workers, gay men and other men who have sex with men, transgender people, children and pregnant women living with HIV, displaced persons, people with disabilities and people aged 50 years and older

PLACE in Zimbabwe : identifying gaps in HIV prevention among orphans and young people in Hwange District, 2006

SINGH, Kavita
et al
April 2008

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The Priorities for Local AIDS Control Efforts (PLACE) method is a tool to identify areas where HIV transmission is most likely to occur, and within these areas, to identify gaps in prevention programmes. In Zimbabwe, the PLACE method was used to understand what risk factors are putting adolescent girls (orphans and non-orphans) and young women 18-24 years of age at risk of acquiring HIV. Because there is an indication that men may sexually abuse adolescent girls in their homes and because it was believed that some adolescent girls may not frequent public places, a household survey was added to the PLACE method

Walking the talk : putting women's rights at the heart of the HIV and AIDS response

CORBY, Nick
et al
2008

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This report argues the need to adopt a rights-based approach to counter gender inequality, violence against women and other violations of women’s rights, in order to combat the HIV and AIDS pandemic effectively. It explores obstacles to universal access to prevention, treatment, care and support for all women and girls. It illustrates the ongoing violations of women’s rights by the actions and inactions of those setting policies, providing funding, offering services and implementing programmes. It further provides working solutions and best practices for overcoming those obstacles. These strategies were gathered through research studies conducted in 13 countries: Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Guatemala, India, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, Nigeria, Pakistan, Rwanda, South Africa, Vanuatu and Zimbabwe

Girls' education and HIV prevention

UNAIDS Inter-Agency Task Team (IATT) for Education
2008

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This briefing note advocates access to education for girls as a priority, particularly because recent research has shown that education reduces their vulnerability to HIV considerably. It suggests a number of strategies and policy changes that would help remove the number of barriers girls' face in getting into and staying in school

HIV and AIDS

WELBOURN, Alice
HOARE, Joanna
Eds
2008

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This collection of articles is drawn largely from Oxfam's journal 'Gender & Development'. It looks at the underlying social, economic and political causes of HIV and AIDS and at the largely community-based responses to these challenges

Joining hands: integrating gender and HIV/AIDS: report of an ACORD project using Stepping Stones in Angola, Tanzania and Uganda

HADJIPATERAS, Angela
et al
July 2007

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This is the report of a two-year project to reduce the vulnerability of women and girls in Africa to HIV and AIDS, using Stepping Stones - a gender-focused participatory process that involves working closely with peer groups. The project's other objectives were to: build the capacity of local structures to respond; promote community responses through effective partnerships and advocacy actions; and find out whether Stepping Stones could be used effectively in unconventional settings with a range of population groups such as the nomadic Mucubai tribe in Southern Angola, internally displaced people living in camps in Northern Uganda, and the 21st Battalion of the Angolan armed forces. Key findings include: improvements in the level of knowledge and understanding of HIV/AIDS and increased communication around sexual issues and between couples and within communities, across all three countries, as well as an increased sense of community responsibility for HIV and AIDS. In addition there was patchy evidence of stigma reduction and some reduction in risky cultural and sexual practices. Although increased respect for women, including self respect and a reduction in gender violence was also noted, female subordination in decision making and control over resources remains. Stepping Stones was on the whole considered to be adaptable for use in a wide range of contexts although more thought was needed to develop effective strategies to combat obstacles when using this process in some circumstances

UNAIDS practical guidelines for intensifying HIV prevention : towards universal access

JOINT UNITED NATIONS PROGRAMME ON HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS)
2007

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These practical guidelines are designed to help policy makers and planners to create an effective national response to HIV prevention, by ensuring that their response matches the epidemic dynamics and social context within their country and the populations who remain most vulnerable to and at risk of HIV infection. The guidelines encourage countries to know the national and local epidemiological scenarios and their current response; to match and prioritise their response; to set ambitious, realistic and measurable prevention targets; to tailor prevention plans to local epidemic scenarios and to use and analyse strategic information

Support women caregivers : fight AIDS

THE GLOBAL COALITION ON WOMEN AND AIDS
2006

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This factsheet considers the impact of HIV and AIDS on families and communities because of most the care for people living with AIDS is provided by women and girls. It looks at the social and economic burden and the training and support needed, and it suggests actions for national governments and for international partners

Stop violence against women : fight AIDS

GLOBAL COALITION ON WOMEN AND AIDS
2006

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This paper calls for measures to stop violence against women and girls because violence increases their vulnerability to AIDS and can be a barrier to them accessing prevention, care and treatment services

Educate girls : fight AIDS

GLOBAL COALITION ON WOMEN AND AIDS
2005

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This paper advocates for the education of girls to help diminish their vulnerability to AIDS. It sets out the action needed of this from schools, national governments and international partners

Women, girls and HIV/AIDS in Malawi

JOINT UNITED NATIONS PROGRAMME ON HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS)
August 2004

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This factsheet contains statistics and outlines the key issues of concern in relation to women and girls and HIV & AIDS in Malawi

Educate a woman, educate a nation|Namibia

GAROSAB, Gerson D
September 2003

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This is one of a series of easy-to-read booklets developed for a series of gender-sensitive workshops aimed at communicating messages on HIV and AIDS to poor, rural people, particularly illiterate women and out-of-school girls. Each booklet contains an illustrated story and some questions for discussion

The wicked healer|Namibia

SHATILWEH, Rosalia Nailonga
ISAI, Aindongo
July 2003

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This is one of a series of easy-to-read booklets developed for a series of gender-sensitive workshops aimed at communicating messages on HIV and AIDS to poor, rural people, particularly illiterate women and out-of-school girls. Each booklet contains an illustrated story and some questions for discussion

Who is the real chicken?|Namibia

KAHIVERE, Walter
February 2003

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This is one of a series of easy-to-read booklets developed for a series of gender-sensitive workshops aimed at communicating messages on HIV and AIDS to poor, rural people, particularly illiterate women and out-of-school girls. Each booklet contains an illustrated story and some questions for discussion

Using ICT to Fight HIV/AIDS

BLOOME, A
July 2002

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Technology can play a complementary and useful role in helping combat HIV/AIDS. This report on the AIDSWEB project in secondary schools in Africa explains how they are using information and communications technology (ICT) to promote HIV/AIDS education and prevention activities. The use of ICT complements other IEC campaigns designed to reach youth. The same technology resources holds great promise for reaching youth, who typically embrace the use of the technology for entertainment, learning and communication when given access to these resources. Evidence shows that women almost any level of skill in ICTs increases their self-esteem and has spillover effects into other activities that work toward poverty alleviation.This decreases their susceptibility to economic situations which put them at greater risk of catching HIV/AIDS hence the importance of teaching girls and young women how to use the Internet

Positively living|Zimbabwe

KUMBAWA, Grace
October 2001

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This is one of a series of easy-to-read booklets developed for a series of gender-sensitive workshops aimed at communicating messages on HIV and AIDS to poor, rural people, particularly illiterate women and out-of-school girls. Each booklet contains an illustrated story and some questions for discussion

Home, the best medicine

MATENDE, Florence
October 2001

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This is one of a series of easy-to-read booklets developed for a series of gender-sensitive workshops aimed at communicating messages on HIV and AIDS to poor, rural people, particularly illiterate women and out-of-school girls. Each booklet contains an illustrated story and some questions for discussion

Real men, take responsibility|Zimbabwe

Ncube, Tokozile
October 2001

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This is one of a series of easy-to-read booklets developed for a series of gender-sensitive workshops aimed at communicating messages on HIV and AIDS to poor, rural people, particularly illiterate women and out-of-school girls. Each booklet contains an illustrated story and some questions for discussion

Kaba's story|Togo

YENTCHARE-KOLANI, Leah
October 2001

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This is one of a series of easy-to-read booklets developed for a series of gender-sensitive workshops aimed at communicating messages on HIV and AIDS to poor, rural people, particularly illiterate women and out-of-school girls. Each booklet contains an illustrated story and some questions for discussion

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