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Human rights toolkit for women and girls with disabilities. First edition.

Women With Disabilities Australia (WWDA)
October 2016

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A Toolkit for women or girls with disabilities to learn more about human rights and how this knowledge can be used to achieve change in their own lives or the lives of others. Following an introduction about why this Toolkit is needed,  a brief overview of five key human rights issues that women and girls with disability in Australia have identified as most important to them is provided. Section 3 provides information about what human rights are and also gives a brief overview about Australia’s international human rights obligations. Sections 4 and 5 focus on the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) and the Convention on the Elimination of all forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW), examining the main ‘Article’ from each, that deals with the important urgent issues that have been identified by women with disability in Australia, which are: Violence; Decision-Making; Participation; Sexual and Reproductive Rights; and, Employment. For each of these issues, the words of the main Article (as it appears in the CRPD and CEDAW) are provided and explained in practical terms, and examples are given of what governments have to know and do. Information from WWDA members and supporters about some of the key changes which need to happen is given. Different ideas of what women and girls with disability can do to help achieve change and promote the rights of all women and girls with disability are given and some sample letters and ‘talking points’ for phone calls to a local Member of Parliament, or a government Minister or advisers are provided.   

Gender and care : supporting resources collection

ESPLEN, Emily
February 2009

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This collection show-cases existing work on gender and care, including a mix of research papers, policy briefings, advocacy documents, case study material and practical tools from diverse disciplines and geographical regions - all focusing on different aspects of care. Summaries and links to key resources are provided, as well as information on international frameworks and conventions relating to care

Gender and development in brief : gender and care

ESPLEN, Emily
February 2009

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This bulletin aims to inspire thinking around how we can move towards a world in which individuals and society recognise and value the importance of different forms of care, but without reinforcing care work as something that only women can or shoud do. It offers an overview of why care is important and the approaches needed to bring about change, including an article which looks at innovative ways of challenging gender norms to bring about a more equal sharing of care responsibilities between men and women, and an inspiring example of home-based carers in Africa coming together to get their priorities heard

Gender and care : overview report

ESPLEN, Emily
January 2009

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This overview report explores how we can move towards a world in which individuals and society recognise and value the importance of different forms of care, but without reinforcing care work as something only women can or should do. It includes recommendations for donors, government and educators

Multiple disadvantages of Mayan females : the effects of gender, ethnicity, poverty, and residence on education in Guatemala

HALLMAN, Kelly
June 2006

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Although access to primary education in Guatemala has increased in recent years, particularly in rural areas, levels of educational attainment and literacy remain among the lowest in Latin America. Problems include late entry, grade repetition, and early dropout. Inequalities in school access and grade attainment linked to ethnicity, gender, poverty, and residence remain. Age trends show that Mayan females are the least likely to ever enroll, and, if they do enroll, to start school the latest and drop out earliest. Mayan females are not a homogeneous group, however. Summary statistics indicate that the one-fourth of Mayan girls who are non-poor have primary school entry rates, school entry age, and grade-for-age levels equal to those of Ladina females, and, conditional upon primary school completion, have secondary school enrollment levels about 80 percent of those of Ladina females. The one-quarter of Mayan girls who are extremely poor, on the other hand, have the worst educational outcomes of all. Multivariate results indicate that being Mayan and female is a barrier to enrollment, particularly among those who are poor. Enrollment rates drop sharply at age 12, and the dropout curve is steepest for Mayan females. While age 12 would be a time of transition from primary to secondary school for children who entered school on time and made regular progress, most nonenrolled children aged 12 and older, especially those who are Mayan, have very low grade attainment and few have completed primary school. The main constraint to Mayan educational achievement therefore appears to be primary school completion. Among nonenrolled young people aged 13-24, household duties and lack of money were the constraints most frequently mentioned by females. Early marriage did not appear to directly affect female enrollment, but related qualitative findings indicate that Mayan parents’ expectations of daughters’ future roles may reduce parental incentives to invest in education beyond the age of puberty. For adolescent males, regardless of ethnicity, market work was by far the most frequently cited cause for nonenrollment, followed by lack of money. Lack of physical access to school was not a frequently cited constraint for children in any age group. In addition to poverty-reduction programs, mechanisms to encourage poor families to start their children’s schooling at age 7 may lead to fewer competing interests with regard to time allocation as children approach puberty and are compelled to assume adult work roles

Support women caregivers : fight AIDS

THE GLOBAL COALITION ON WOMEN AND AIDS
2006

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This factsheet considers the impact of HIV and AIDS on families and communities because of most the care for people living with AIDS is provided by women and girls. It looks at the social and economic burden and the training and support needed, and it suggests actions for national governments and for international partners

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