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Disabilities, human rights and international cooperation : human rights-based approach and lived experiences of Ugandan women with disabilities

KATSUI, Hisayo
2012

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"This study investigated human rights--based approaches of international and development cooperation towards the equality of persons with disabilities in Uganda...A case study method as well as a participatory research approach among others was applied to create evidence-based and in-depth knowledge on the theme, particularly from the viewpoint of women with disabilities and deaf women on the grassroots"
Publication series number 8

Research issues in sexual and reproductive health for low- and middle-income countries

DE FRANCISCO, Andres
DIXON-MUELLER, Ruth
D'ARCANGUES, Catherine
2007

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This paper outlines a conceptual framework and a number of thematic and cross-cutting research issues in sexual and reproductive health as a first step in a consultative process towards the identification of gaps and priorities for research in this field. The themes of social equity, poverty and gender addressed in this paper are of particular relevance to the field of sexual and reproductive health. So, too, are the challenges of collaborating with in-country partners to identify context-specific research priorities that address the many and varied dimensions of sexual and reproductive health and its determinants and correlates in order to build the evidence base and put policy and programmatic evidence into practice in low-resource settings

Tackling HIV and AIDS stigma and discrimination

Source International Information Support Centre
Ed
2007

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This is a key list of resources that were referenced in background material for one of the Spark Lunchtime Discussions, an initiative of Healthlink Worldwide and Panos London to facilitate the sharing of good practice, innovations and cutting edge thinking in health communications among health and development NGOs, policy-makers and practitioners

Infrastructure for all : meeting the needs of both men and women in development projects|A practical guide for engineers, technicians and project managers

REED, Brian
COATES, Sue
PARRY-JONES, Sarah
et al
2007

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This book provides information to help engineers, technicians and project managers ensure that the facilities they design and build are beneficial to all members of society. Using examples, especially related to water and sanitation, the book highlights the need for social analysis and gender analysis to improve the design, implementation and use of infrastructure. It would be useful for engineers, technicians and project managers interested in infrastructure development in low- and middle-income countries

Behind the pandemic : uncovering the links between social inequity and HIV/AIDS

DE PAUW, Lia
2007

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This is an education toolkit which takes an exploratory and participatory approach to helping improve people's understanding about international HIV and AIDS issues and the links between HIV and AIDS and social inequity and poverty. There are three modules: Background and Basics, a Global HIV Pandemic Simulation, and Moving Into Action: Stopping the Pandemic. It also contains an extensive information section and instructions for leading the sessions

Girls' adolescence in Burkina Faso : a pivot point for social change

BRADY, Martha
SALOUCOU, Lydia
CHONG, Erica
2007

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As closer attention is paid to the lives of adolescents in sub-Saharan Africa, girls are found to be clearly disadvantaged, compared with their male counterparts. In Burkina Faso it is estimated that 74 percent of girls aged 15-19 cannot read. Burkinabé girls are frequently married at a young age, and more than one-third of married girls find themselves in polygamous unions as second or third wives, married to much older men. Understanding and recognising girls' realities is an important first step in planning appropriate and meaningful interventions for them. Girls who are unmarried, "promised," engaged, or married face different constraints and merit different program approaches. This report aims to fill gaps in our knowledge regarding adolescent Burkinabé girls so as better serve the needs of this most vulnerable population

HIV and AIDS treatment education : a critical component of efforts to ensure universal access to prevention, treatment and care

UNAIDS INTER AGENCY TASK TEAM (IATT) ON EDUCATION
June 2006

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The expansion of access to ART is significantly improving the lives of people living with HIV and the wellbeing of communities affected by the epidemic. However, stigmatization and discrimination and poor adherence threaten to weaken the full potential of drug treatment and medical care. This paper looks at the contribution that treatment education can make to maximise the impact of greater ART accessibility and improved care provision. It takes a wide-ranging approach to education, which should include treatment literacy, advocacy and community mobilisation. It takes the view that treatment preparedness can only be achieved through the full involvement of people living with HIV/AIDS. An effective strategy will also rely on inter-sectoral collaboration between governments, the education sector, civil society and development organizations. It argues that the success of interventions will depend on their gender-responsiveness, and in their ability to adopt participatory and interactive methods, targeting different groups and settings in a culturally sensitive manner

Evaluating Stepping Stones : a review of existing evaluations and ideas for future M&E work

WALLACE, Tina
June 2006

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This publication aims to review monitoring and evaluation activities, methodologies and findings around the Stepping Stones (SS) approach. Over the last ten years, Stepping Stones has been used by many NGOs as an effective tool for HIV prevention, gender empowerment, community mobilisation and promotion of PLWHA rights. However, monitoring and evaluation documentation on SS is sparse and does not reflect the wealth of learning about the methodology. Key findings show that SS helps improve communication about health issues and supports behaviour changes, although evidence that it has led to a decline in HIV or AIDS incidence is less clear. The report calls for well-designed and systematic monitoring and evaluation activities, and for a strategic dissemination of findings and monitoring and evaluation data

Multiple disadvantages of Mayan females : the effects of gender, ethnicity, poverty, and residence on education in Guatemala

HALLMAN, Kelly
June 2006

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Although access to primary education in Guatemala has increased in recent years, particularly in rural areas, levels of educational attainment and literacy remain among the lowest in Latin America. Problems include late entry, grade repetition, and early dropout. Inequalities in school access and grade attainment linked to ethnicity, gender, poverty, and residence remain. Age trends show that Mayan females are the least likely to ever enroll, and, if they do enroll, to start school the latest and drop out earliest. Mayan females are not a homogeneous group, however. Summary statistics indicate that the one-fourth of Mayan girls who are non-poor have primary school entry rates, school entry age, and grade-for-age levels equal to those of Ladina females, and, conditional upon primary school completion, have secondary school enrollment levels about 80 percent of those of Ladina females. The one-quarter of Mayan girls who are extremely poor, on the other hand, have the worst educational outcomes of all. Multivariate results indicate that being Mayan and female is a barrier to enrollment, particularly among those who are poor. Enrollment rates drop sharply at age 12, and the dropout curve is steepest for Mayan females. While age 12 would be a time of transition from primary to secondary school for children who entered school on time and made regular progress, most nonenrolled children aged 12 and older, especially those who are Mayan, have very low grade attainment and few have completed primary school. The main constraint to Mayan educational achievement therefore appears to be primary school completion. Among nonenrolled young people aged 13-24, household duties and lack of money were the constraints most frequently mentioned by females. Early marriage did not appear to directly affect female enrollment, but related qualitative findings indicate that Mayan parents’ expectations of daughters’ future roles may reduce parental incentives to invest in education beyond the age of puberty. For adolescent males, regardless of ethnicity, market work was by far the most frequently cited cause for nonenrollment, followed by lack of money. Lack of physical access to school was not a frequently cited constraint for children in any age group. In addition to poverty-reduction programs, mechanisms to encourage poor families to start their children’s schooling at age 7 may lead to fewer competing interests with regard to time allocation as children approach puberty and are compelled to assume adult work roles

Incorporating gender into your NGO

WASSENAAR, Nicolien
May 2006

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This resource addresses the issue of gender in NGOs. The first part discusses introductory concepts, including sex and gender, gender roles, division of labour, and gender mainstreaming. The second part presents a step-by-step guide to 'engendering' an organisation, suggesting 'what to do and how to do it'. Each step is clearly defined and illustrated with examples. The process of gender inclusion and mainstreaming is highlighted in all phases, from gender analysis of the organisation, identifying necessary changes and developing a strategic gender plan, to programme implementation and monitoring and evaluation. Includes a list of related resources and websites

Tap and reposition youth (TRY) : providing social support, savings, and microcredit opportunities for young women in areas with high HIV prevalence

ERULKAR, Annabel
et al
March 2006

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Tap and Reposition Youth (TRY) was a multiphase initiative undertaken by the Population Council and K-Rep Development Agency (KDA), the oldest and largest microfinance institution in Kenya. The overall aim of the project was to reduce adolescents' vulnerabilities to adverse social and reproductive health outcomes, including HIV infection, by improving their livelihoods options. The project was launched in low-income and slum areas of Nairobi, Kenya, where rates of HIV infection are alarming and where young women are disproportionately affected

Integrating poverty and gender into health programmes : a source book for health professionals : module on malaria

COLL-BLACK, Sarah
2006

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This book aims to raise awareness, knowledge and skills of health professionals with regards to poverty and gender concerns relating to the prevention and control of malaria. It defines malaria, its symptoms and transmission; looks at the links between gender, poverty and malaria; and considers the importance of addressing gender and poverty issues in malaria control programmes and how this can be done. There is also a list of tools and resources to help with this work

Ensuring equitable access to antiretroviral treatment for women : WHO/UNAIDS policy statement

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
2005

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This policy brief identifies actions needed to address the gender dimensions of equity in access to ART. It identifies four key areas: development of a supportive policy environment; strengthening health systems to make them more responsive to the specific needs of women and men; promotion of programmes that overcome obstacles to equitable access; development of benchmarks and indicators to measure progress. This brief addresses each area in turn

Gender and ICTs for development : a global sourcebook

VALK, Minke
CUMMINGS, Sarah
VAN DAM, Henk
Eds
2005

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This book aims to document and analyse emerging experiences in the field of gender, ICT and develoment, and addresses policy, programmatic and theoretical issues and debates. Case studies explore the use of satellites, mobile telephones, wireless networks and applications such as Internet, email, distance learning, teleworking, digital radio and video. Some conclusions from the case studies are that: ICTs are not gender-neutral, because women seek to use them to break out of systematic discrimmination, and even gender violence; women use ICTs transform low-tech projects into more strategic initiatives that address gender inequities; links to policy and control of communication networks, of both new and conventional media are evident. The editors argue that there is a need to go beyond simply "women and technology" to focus on gender relations in communication and learning

Mainstreaming disability in development : lessons from gender mainstreaming

MILLER, Carol
ALBERT, Bill
2005

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This document uses gender mainstreaming as a template to assess how successfully disability has been brought into the mainstream, and how to promote disability equality. With a specific emphasis on the work and practices of DFID, it identifies eight key lessons from gender mainstreaming that can be applied to disability in development: develop clear institutional policy on disability equality; devise robust institutional structures capable of promoting a disability agenda; sustain an appropriate institutional culture; facilitate policy-relevant research and information; provide adequate guidelines and tools; promote the involvement of people with disabilities; carry out monitoring and evaluation activities

Operational guide on gender and HIV/AIDS : a rights-based approach | Resource pack on gender and HIV/AIDS

UNAIDS INTER-AGENCY TASK TEAM ON GENDER AND HIV/AIDS
2005

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This guide highlights the relationship between gender, rights and HIV and AIDS. The impact of HIV and AIDS tends to be greater in unequal settings and stigma and discrimination, often associated with the disease, intensify and reinforce inequality. This document, aimed at programme managers and development organisations, reflects on how gender inequality affects women affected by HIV and AIDS. It explains why women may be at greater risk of contracting the disease, while having poor access to treatment. Women also tend to assume the responsibility of caring for those who are sick, and girls in households affected by HIV are more likely than boys to be taken out of school as a cost-saving measure, and to help in domestic chores. The guide contains a set of checklists to help evaluate the level of commitment to gender equality in programming, funding, communication, networking and advocacy

Women's participation in disaster relief and recovery

YONDER, Ayse
AKCAR, Sengul
GOPALAN, Prema
2005

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This pamphlet provides case studies from three earthquake-striken areas in India and Turkey. They provide examples of how low-income women who have lost everything can form groups and become active participants in the relief and recovery process. Readers learn how women became involved in housing, created businesses, mobilized funds, and provided crucial community services.The pamphlet also examines the roles that NGOs and government policy and procedures play in facilitating (or impeding) women's involvement

Mexico : Forum 8. Book of abstracts

GLOBAL FORUM FOR RESEARCH
November 2004

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This collection contains abstracts of posters presented at the Mexico Forum 8, which aimed at addressing the "10/90 gap": less than ten per cent of research funds are devoted to 90 per cent of the world health needs. The forum gathered around 900 participants from 450 institutions in 109 countries. Participants represented governments, multilateral and bilateral aid agencies, international and national foundations and NGOs, women's organisations, research institutions and universities, the private sector and the media. Abstracts cover topics including health research, disease prevention, child mortality, maternal health, substance abuse, mental and neurological health

Nonconsensual sex among youth

FINGER, William
et al
March 2004

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Reproductive health and HIV prevention programmes for youth rarely look at the reallity of coercive sex that so many youth face. Coercive sex is a violation of a person's rights and can have severe mental, physical and reproductive health consequences, including pregnancy and HIV and other STIs. This paper highlights a number of key issues: the range of sexual coercion faced by youth; the impact of gender norms on coercion; the consequences of coercion; and programme approaches to reduce the problem

Persons with disability : study commissioned by the Corporate Planning Unit of the City of Joburg as a component of the human development agenda

WHITEHEAD, Melissa
2004

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The aim of this research is to highlight problems with, and identify gaps in, the human development agenda as they relate to persons with disability in the City of Johannesburg. The research report also gives an overview of the methodologies applied.
The report is useful for organisations and persons who want to learn more about the situation of disabled persons in Johannesburg. Also it is of interest for researchers and organisations that are developing research methodology and policy

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