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Transforming our world : the 2030 agenda for sustainable development

UNITED NATIONS (UN)
October 2015

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This document presents the finalised text for adoption of the UN’s 2015-2030 Sustainable Development agenda, a plan of action for people, planet and prosperity.  The Agenda seeks to strengthen universal peace in larger freedom and recognises that eradicating poverty in all its forms and dimensions, including extreme poverty, is the greatest global challenge and an indispensable requirement for sustainable development. It calls for countries and all stakeholders, acting in collaborative partnership, to implement this plan and  pledges that no one will be left behind. It seeks to build on the Millennium Development Goals and complete what these did not achieve, and it is anticipated that the Goals and targets will stimulate action over the next fifteen years in areas of critical importance for humanity and the planet

 

The document provides an introduction and vision, shared principles and commitments, the world today and the new agenda, the means of implementation, the follow up and review, and a call for action to change our world. It then specifically outlines the new agenda of 17 sustainable development goals (SDGs) and the associated 169 developmental targets, the means of implementation and global partnership, and the expected follow-up and review over the next 15 years at national, regional and global levels

 

The 17 SDGs include: 

  • Goal 1. End poverty in all its forms everywhere
  • Goal 2. End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture
  • Goal 3. Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages
  • Goal 4. Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all
  • Goal 5. Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls
  • Goal 6. Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all
  • Goal 7. Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all
  • Goal 8. Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all
  • Goal 9. Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and foster innovation
  • Goal 10. Reduce inequality within and among countries
  • Goal 11. Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable
  • Goal 12. Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns
  • Goal 13. Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts
  • Goal 14. Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development
  • Goal 15. Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss
  • Goal 16. Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels
  • Goal 17. Strengthen the means of implementation and revitalize the global partnership for sustainable development

Projecting progress : reaching the SDGs by 2030

NICOLAI, Susan
et al
September 2015

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The report presents an analysis that begins to systematically quantify the scale of the challenge that the world has set itself with the Sustainable Development Goals for the first time.  The authors selected one target per goal – a total of 17 – and projected forward to 2030, grading them from A-F according to how near they will be to completion in 2030. This was based on available projections of current trends sourced from leading institutions, alongside our own where there were gaps. The resulting scorecard shows that unless significant changes are made, none of the SDGs will be met

Gender and climate change : three things you should know

THE WORLD BANK GROUP
2011

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Through gender analysis, this report presents ways to mitigate possible risks that may exacerbate gender inequality, and highlights opportunities to enhance positive outcomes in the context of climate change. It features three key implications: women are disproportionately vulnerable to the effects of natural disasters and climate change where their rights and socio-economic status are not equal to those of men; empowerment of women is an important ingredient in building climate resilience; low-emissions development pathways can be more effective and more equitable where they are designed using a gender-informed approach. This report is useful to anyone interested in gender and climate change

Child centred disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation : roles of gender and culture in Indonesia

HAYNES, Katharine
LASSA, Jonatan
TOWERS, Briony
September 2010

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"The principle aim of this research was to investigate the roles of gender and religion in child-centred disaster risk reduction (DRR). Moreover, and through participatory research, informal conversations and direct advocacy, the project team hoped to build knowledge and awareness of child-centred DRR. The research was also designed to validate findings from previous research by the wider project team and to provide a body of empirical evidence in support of child-centred DRR and the Children in a Changing Climate programme"
Working Paper No 2

Shortcut to the frontline : supporting local NGOs on climate change in Bangladesh an INTRAC/PRIP Trust research report

LONNQVIST, Linda
et al
January 2010

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"This research project aims to understand the role of local (non-centralised Bangladeshi) NGOs in climate change work: their current situation, outlook and future prospects. It is a snapshot of how different NGOs in south-western Bangladesh approach the issue: small and large ones; ones that are well-connected internationally and those who are well-rooted in their ‘base’ communities; ones that deliver services to the stricken and those who fight for systemic changes. South-western Bangladesh is a region that is already under threat from climate change-resembling dangers such as cyclones and flooding, and much NGO activity is concentrated there"
Occasional Papers Series No 50

Gender perspectives : integrating disaster risk reduction into climate change adaptation|Good practices and lessons learned

UNITED NATIONS INTERNATIONAL STRATEGY FOR DISASTER REDUCTION (UNISDR)
2008

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"This publication demonstrates the link between disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation, while contributing to the ongoing global effort to promote gender equality in socio-economic development...The first section emphasizes women’s knowledge and capacity as environmental and natural resource managers. It also highlights the importance of land use and management, and alternative livelihood options in the context of climate change. The second section highlights women’s participation in community decision making processes, showing the importance of building women’s and girls’ capacity in disaster risk reduction, and demonstrating their potential for leadership. The third section briefly showcases some specific tools used to mainstream gender into planning and policy development, to assess vulnerability, and to design adaptive strategies. For ease of reference, each good practice is presented in the same format beginning with a short abstract"

Projecting progress : reaching the SDGs by 2030 : interactive storyboard

OVERSEAS DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE (ODI)

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This website shows the Overseas Development Institute’s (ODI) Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) interactive story board. It provides a scorecard, based upon taking data from one target per goal and projecting forward to 2030, with each goal graded from A-F according to how near they will be to completion in 2030. The results include no ‘A’s are awarded, and 5 goals receive an ‘F’ illustrating that, unless significant changes are made, none of the SDGs will be met. The remainder of the website also features videos, images and text outlining what must happen if the world is to reverse these projections and successfully implement all 17 SDGs

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