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School and classroom disabilities inclusion guide for low- and middle-income countries

BULAT, Jennae
HAYES, Anne
et al
January 2017

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This guide provides strategies and recommendations for developing inclusive classrooms and schools. We specifically address the needs of Sub-Saharan African countries, which lack the resources for implementing inclusive education. However, our strategies and recommendations can be equally useful in other contexts where inclusive education practices have not yet been adopted. Strategies for enhancing existing school and classroom environment and instruction include: modify the physical environment; modify classroom managment strategies; ensure social inclusion; adopt best instructional practices; apply strategies for students with sensory disabilities; and use assistive technologies. Strategies for adopting response to intervention include: tier by tier implementation; individualised education plans; and planning for school wide adoption of inclusive practices and a multilevel system of support.

 

 

Satellite classes: A promising model for educating children and young people on the autism spectrum

CROYDEN, Abigail
et al
2017

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Results of research into attempts to provide the best of both mainstream and specialist education for autistic children are presented. The ‘satellite class’ model of supported inclusion is where the strengths of a special school education are kept in place for selected autistic pupils as they transfer to dedicated classes within mainstream ‘host schools’. The schools studied were all within the London borough of Tower Hamlets, UK.

QualityRights materials for training, guidance and transformation

WHO
2017

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"As part of the QualityRights Initiative, WHO has developed a comprehensive package of training and guidance modules. The modules can be used to build capacity among mental health practitioners, people with psychosocial, intellectual and cognitive disabilities, people using mental health services, families, care partners and other supporters, NGOs, DPOs and others on how to implement a human rights and recovery approach in the area of mental health in line with the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and other international human rights standards".

Emergency planning (for carers)

ENABLE SCOTLAND
January 2017

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Emergency planning is relevant to all carers, irrespective of the age of the carer, the age of the person they care for or the health needs or disability the cared-for person has.

The emergency planning toolkit will helps a carer create an emergency plan. Answering ‘Who, What Why, Where and When’, enables planning for any unforeseen circumstances.

Working through the toolkit, requires a carer to consider all eventualities and possible solutions. Relevant family, friends and professionals should be involved in this process.

Once a carer has worked through the toolkit they should have enough information to complete the emergency plan

Precarious lives and resistant possibilities: the labour of people with learning disabilities in times of austerity

BATES, Keith
GOODLEY, Dan
RUNSWICK-COLE, Katherine
2017

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This paper draws on feminist and queer philosophers? discussions of precarity and employment, too often absent from disability studies, to explore the working lives of people with learning disabilities in England in a time of austerity. Recent policy shifts from welfare to work welcome more disabled people into the job market. The reality is that disabled people remain under-represented in labour statistics and are conspicuously absent in cultures of work. We live in neoliberal- able times where we all find ourselves precarious. But, people with learning disabilities experience high levels of uncertainty in every aspect of their lives, including work, relationships and community living. Our research reveals an important analytical finding: that when people with learning disabilities are supported in imaginative and novel ways they are able to work effectively and cohesively participate in their local communities (even in a time of cuts to welfare). We conclude by acknowledging that we are witnessing a global politics of precarity and austerity. Our urgent task is to redress the unequal spread of precaritization across our society that risks leaving people with learning disabilities experiencing disproportionately perilous lives. One of our key recommendations is that it makes no economic sense (never mind moral sense) to pull funding from organisations that support people with intellectual disabilities to work.

Global report: Self-Advocacy for inclusion

INCLUSION INTERNATIONAL
November 2016

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Across the Inclusion International network, many individuals and organisations took part in workshops, surveys and interviews to report:

  • what self-advocacy means to them
  • what good support is 
  • how organisations can be more inclusive
  • the vital role that families play in empowering self-advocacy.

This report provides a snapshot of work, and has some useful information for self-advocates, supporters, organisations and families. As well as containing the results from the global survey, interviews and workshops, this report also provides some useful guidance for anyone who wants to make the world more inclusive for people with intellectual disabilities.

 

A website (www.selfadvocacyportal.com) has been developed to share good practice and resources.

Confessions of an inadequate researcher: space and supervision in research with learning disabled children

BENZON, Nadia von
2016

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Location is often at the fore of decision-making regarding fieldwork and choice of methods. However, little research has directly discussed the importance of the choice of site in the production of research data, particularly concerning the way that different relationships will manifest between researcher and participant in different spaces. Site may be particularly important in research with (learning disabled) children, as research location is intertwined with the level of caregiving required from the researcher, and the sorts of surveillance the research engagement may be subject to. This paper draws on research with learning disabled 6–16-year olds that took place in homes, schools and the outdoors, in a variety of microgeographical locations from bedrooms to nature reserves. This paper reflects on the challenges, including the very ‘worst’ research moments, occurring in the different research environments. Whilst the research was carried out with learning disabled children and young people, the discussion has implications for research with non-disabled children and ‘vulnerable’ participants more broadly.

Sexual violence against women with disabilities in Ghana: Accounts of women with disabilities from Ashanti Region

OPOKU, Maxwell Peprah
HUYSER, Nicole
MPRAH, Wisdom Kwadwo
ALUPO, Beatrice Atim
BADU, Eric
2016

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Purpose: Women with disabilities are particularly vulnerable to violence and often at risk of being violated sexually. The study aimed to document the causes and consequences of sexual violence against women with disabilities in Mampong Municipality of Ashanti region in Ghana.

 

Methods: This exploratory study recruited 41 participants, made up of women living with intellectual, visual and hearing disabilities, were interviewed using convenience and snowball sampling techniques. 

 

Results: It was found that many participants had suffered sexual violence and factors such as poverty, rejection by families, isolation and unemployment were given as the cause. It was also found that these women suffered consequences such as unwanted pregnancies, divorce, outright rejection and psychological trauma.

 

Conclusion: The current situation of women with disabilities make it impossible for them to escape sexual violence. Therefore, it is essential that national awareness campaigns be fashioned to encourage people to provide support to their family members with disabilities. 

Childhood disability in Turkana, Kenya: Understanding how carers cope in a complex humanitarian setting

ZUURMOND, Maria
NYAPERA, Velma
MWENDA, Victoria
KISIA, James
RONO, Hilary
PALMER, Jennifer
2016

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Background: Although the consequences of disability are magnified in humanitarian contexts, research into the difficulties of caring for children with a disability in such settings has received limited attention.


Methods: Based on in-depth interviews with 31 families, key informants and focus group discussions in Turkana, Kenya, this article explores the lives of families caring for children with a range of impairments (hearing, vision, physical and intellectual) in a complex humanitarian context characterised by drought, flooding, armed conflict, poverty and historical marginalisation.


Results: The challenging environmental and social conditions of Turkana magnified not only the impact of impairment on children, but also the burden of caregiving. The remoteness of Turkana, along with the paucity and fragmentation of health, rehabilitation and social services, posed major challenges and created opportunity costs for families. Disability-related stigma isolated mothers of children with disabilities, especially, increasing their burden of care and further limiting their access to services and humanitarian programmes. In a context where social systems are already stressed, the combination of these factors compounded the vulnerabilities faced by children with disabilities and their families.


Conclusion: The needs of children with disabilities and their carers in Turkana are not being met by either community social support systems or humanitarian aid programmes. There is an urgent need to mainstream disability into Turkana services and programmes.

The validation of an educational database for children with profound intellectual disabilities

SPANGENBERG, Karlien
CORTEN, Lieselotte
VAN RENSBURG, Winnie
KILIAN, Elizma
MCKENZIE, Judith
VORSTER, Hein
JELSMA, Jennifer
2016

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Background: The Western Cape Forum for Intellectual Disability took the South African Government to court in 2010 on its failure to implement the right to education for Children with Severe and Profound Intellectual Disability. Subsequently, multidisciplinary teams were appointed by the Western Cape Education Department to deliver services to the Special Care Centres (SCCs). Initially, minimal information was available on this population.


Objectives: The purpose is to document the process of developing and validating a database for the collection of routine data.


Method: A descriptive analytical study design was used. A sample of convenience was drawn from individuals under the age of 18 years, enrolled in SCCs in the Western Cape. The team who entered and analysed the data reached consensus regarding the utility and feasibility of each item.


Results: Data were collected on 134 children. The omission of certain items from the database was identified. Some information was not reliable or readily available. Of the instruments identified to assess function, the classification systems were found to be reliable and useful, as were the performance scales. The WeeFIM, on the other hand, was lengthy and expensive, and was therefore discarded.
Discussion and conclusions: A list of items to be included was identified. Apart from an individual profile, it can be useful for service planning and monitoring, if incorporated into the central information system used to monitor the performance of all children. Without such inclusion, this most vulnerable population, despite court ruling, will not have their right to education adequately addressed.

An Opportunity for Charity? A Catholic Tradition in Understanding Disability and Its Impact on Ministry

MASTERS, Anne
2016

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David Perry, the father of a boy with Down Syndrome, wrote an angry reaction to Pope Francis’ references to individuals and families living with disabilities in Amoris Laetitia. Perry is con- cerned about the limited perspective of persons with disabilities that is portrayed in the texts, which show families commended for their love and tolerance, with a lack of appreciation for the person with a disability as a person of interest, rather than an object of pity. He offers further reflections of caution and hope in response to words and actions of Pope Francis during a Mass celebrating disability awareness. Perry’s comments provide the starting point for reflecting on the image of persons with disabilities presented in Amoris Laetitia and a discussion of possibilities for charity to serve as a corrective for this and pastoral practice.

Living in fear: experiences of hate crime and discrimination amongst people with learning disabilities and autism

BRADSHAW, Jill
RICHARDSON, Lisa
May 2016

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The views and experiences of people with learning disabilities and autism living within one UK unitary authority (Medway, Kent) were explored.  Aspects investigated were: how many people victimisation affects; who is affected by victimisation; what type of things happen to them; and the impact of victimisation on their quality of life.  The focus groups were: 7 groups with people with intellectual disability and autism (31 people); 4 groups with family and paid carers (33 people).  A survey was completed by: people with intellectual disabilities and autism (220 surveys) and family or paid carers (35 surveys).  27 individual interviews were carried out. 

Consigned to the margins: A call for global action to challenge intellectual disability stigma

SCIOR, K
HAMID, A
HASTINGS, R
WERNER, S
BELTON C
LANIYAN, A
PATEL, M
GROCE, N
KETT, M
May 2016

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To determine current issues related to persons with intellectual disabilities, we undertook a global study, examining government action as reported to the CRPD Committee and gathering data from 667 disability experts and organisations from 88 countries regarding the extent to which low awareness of intellectual disability and stigma are continuing concerns, and what is being done to tackle these concerns

The Lancet, Global Health, Vol 4, Issue 5, PE294-E295, May 01, 2016

‘Everyone needs love’ – an interview study about perceptions of love in people with intellectual disability (ID)

MATTILA, Jenni
MÄÄTTÄ, Kaarina
UUSIAUTTI, Satu
2016

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How do people with intellectual disability (ID) perceive love and its role in their lives? The purpose of this study was to give voice to people with ID themselves and provide information about their needs for love. The study analysed how seven Finnish young adults with mild ID (5 women and 2 men) aged between 18 and 31 years described love and the meaning of love in their lives in semi-structured, qualitative theme interviews. The analysis was theory-led content analysis. The findings showed that the young adults with ID could describe love primarily as emotions and concrete acts, but perceived love as knowledge and skills more difficult to describe. However, the meaning of love was considered crucial and important for everyone’s well-being. The study suggests that the views and opinions of people with ID should be given more attention so that the support and guidance they are given would better need their needs. In addition, the study highlights everyone’s right to love? As per the style. Please suggest.

The economic impact of inclusion in the open labour market for persons with disabilities

BEYER, Stephen
BEYER, Annie
2016

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"This study looks into the inclusion of persons with disabilities and its impact on the economy. Persons with disabilities have been included in mainstream, specialist and active labour market programmes over the years in the EU. During the first decade of 2000s, many countries have used the "Work First Approaches", which led people to work before any training. The work first approaches have during the previous times provided good employment without people having the skills. In recent times, an activation approach has been developed in order to ensure that people with more complex disabilities are included in the labour market. This created inclusion programmes that assist people in the job search process, like individual counselling, vocational rehabilitation etc". The report provides an extensive overview of studies and research on the economic impact inclusion in the open labour market for persons with disabilities can have for governments and public authorities and a more general overview assessing impact on businesses and individuals. This study provides a review of the relevant literature. Using standard methods, relevant articles in the English language (or with English language abstracts) were identified, published between 1980 and 2016. 
 

The medical inadmissibility of intellectual disability: A postcolonial reading of Canadian immigration systems

SPAGNUOLO, Natalie
2016

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This article builds upon existing critiques of Canada’s immigration system by focusing on the medical inadmissibility of young people labelled with intellectual disabilities. In considering how the Canadian state regulates applications for permanent residency, it explores discourses and practices of citizenship which invoke mutually-constituting identity markers such as disability and race. A close reading of case studies involving family applicants, demonstrates how immigration policies and legal systems frame the needs of young people labelled with intellectual or ‘profound’ disabilities as a burden to Canadian society. Individuals who were initially denied admission to Canada due to their diagnostic label, experience disability-related discrimination in different ways depending on the role of their perceived racial, gender, and class identities, among others. The individuals considered in this study navigate intersectional identities and ableist legal systems in their efforts to resist discrimination and win a review of their residency applications. This analysis will show that applicants are forced to work through the logic of medical assessment processes to favourably position their children within impairment hierarchies which rank intellectual disability as ‘too disabled’ to be admissible.

 

Disability & the Global South (DGS), 2016, Vol. 3 No. 2

Disability & the Global South (DGS), 2016, Vol. 3 No. 2

2016

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Articles include:

  • Towards a ‘mind map’ for evaluative thinking in Community Based Rehabilitation: reflections and learning
  • Participation of persons with disabilities in political activities in Cameroon
  • The medical inadmissibility of intellectual disability: A Postcolonial reading of Canadian immigration systems
  • Research principles and research experiences: critical reflection on conducting a PhD dissertation on global health and disability
  • Contingencias normalizadoras en la relación Discapacidad–Trabajo en Francia y Uruguay

Inclusive civic engagement toolkit for governments

INCLUSION INTERNATIONAL
October 2015

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This toolkit has been developed as part of an Inclusion International project, Accessing the Ballot Box, funded by the UN Democracy Fund. The project was designed to address the limited political participation of people with intellectual disabilities in Kenya, Zanzibar and Lebanon.

It sought to identify and challenge the barriers people with intellectual disabilities face in exercising their right to civic engagement and political participation and increase the awareness and knowledge of project stakeholders (people with intellectual disabilities, their families and representative organizations, service providers and governments) on building inclusive democratic processes.

Inclusive civic engagement toolkit. An information toolkit for families and people with intellectual disabilities

INCLUSION INTERNATIONAL
October 2015

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This toolkit has been developed as part of an Inclusion International project, Accessing the Ballot Box, funded by the UN Democracy Fund. The project was designed to address the limited political participation of people with intellectual disabilities in Kenya, Zanzibar and Lebanon.

It sought to identify and challenge the barriers people with intellectual disabilities face in exercising their right to civic engagement and political participation and increase the awareness and knowledge of project stakeholders (people with intellectual disabilities, their families and representative organizations, service providers and governments) on building inclusive democratic processes.

This information toolkit is designed to explore how to support people to access the ballot box before during and after elections and to support people with intellectual disabilities and their families, governments and partners to ensure people with intellectual disabilities are able to exercise their right to political participation.

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