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Disability and global health: Special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health

KUPER, Hannah
POLAK, Sarah
Eds
2019

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Papers included in this special issue are:

 

Standard school eye health guidelines for low and middle-income countries

GILBERT, Clare
MINTO, Hasan
MORJARIA, Priya
KHAN, Imran
February 2018

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The purpose of these best practice guidelines is to provide direction to those planning and implementing eye health initiatives for schools, including policy makers, health care and educational authorities, health planners, eye care delivery organizations and professionals, in partnership with teachers, parents and children. In situations where resources for eye health are limited, decisions need to be made to ensure that programs not only address public health problems but are also implemented in a way that is effective, efficient and, wherever possible, sustainable. Systems for monitoring and plans for evaluation should also be developed at the outset. These practice guidelines provide an excellent learning resource for a module on school eye health that can be incorporated in optometry and ophthalmology residency curricula.  A section highlights some of the challenges in current school eye health initiatives and provides a framework in which school eye health is integrated into school health programs. Case studies are provided to emphasise the integrated approach and a 15-step approach, from situation analysis to monitoring and evaluation, is suggested. Practical recommendations for implementation are provided, including information on the equipment and technology required

 

This evidence-based document is based on best practice guidelines initially developed through a joint collaboration between Sightsavers International, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and the Brien Holden Vision Institute

Strengthening environmental sustainability and inclusion in health and other development programs. Practical guidance for environmental sustainability, accessibility, gender, safeguarding and disaster risk reduction

CBM
2018

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The purpose of this booklet is to promote discussion and innovation for strengthening environmental sustainability and inclusion in health and other development activities. The case studies and checklists are designed to foster creative thinking and the ongoing gathering of evidence related to these topics. The booklet will be useful to anyone seeking high quality outcomes from health and other development programs. The information was first compiled for CBM’s engagement in the General Assembly of the International Agency for the Prevention of Blindness 2016, however will be useful for advancing sustainable development with inclusion in any context.

The case sutdies are: Environmental Sustainability in Eye Health, Caritas Takeo Eye Hospital (CTEH), Cambodia; and  Strengthening Accessibility and Inclusion in Eye Health. UMC Kissy Eye Hospital, Freetown, Sierra Leone, West Africa

Use of subjective and objective criteria to categorise visual disability

KAJLA, Garima
ROHATGI, Jolly
DHALIWAL, Upreet
May 2014

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This article presents research into the use of  subjective (quality of life) as well as objective criteria to classify visual disability. When both subjective and objective criteria were used, instead of just the commonly accepted objective criteria, visual disability could be  objectively reclassified

Indian Journal of Ophthalmology, Vol. 62, Issue 4

Disability and diversity

INTERNATIONAL CENTRE FOR EYE HEALTH
2013

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This resource provides practical advice for eye care professionals in low and middle income countries on how to how to make eye care inclusive and accessible and engage with people with different impairments
Community Eye Health Journal, Vol 26, No 81

Preterm-associated visual impairment and estimates of retinopathy of prematurity at regional and global levels for 2010

BLENCOWE, Hannah
LAWN, Joy E
GILBERT, Clare
December 2010

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This article presents the systematic reviews and meta-analyses undertaken to estimate the risk of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) and subsequent visual impairment for surviving preterm babies by level of neonatal care, access to ROP screening, and treatment. A compartmental model was used to estimate ROP cases and numbers of visually impaired survivors.  The authors conclude that improved care, including oxygen delivery and monitoring, for preterm babies in all facility settings would reduce the number of babies affected with ROP. They recommend that improved data tracking and coverage of locally adapted screening/treatment programs are urgently required

Pediatr Res, Vol 74, Suppl 1

Future sight loss UK (1) : the economic impact of partial sight and blindness in the UK adult population

ACCESS ECONOMIC PTY LIMITED
July 2009

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This report estimates the economic impact of partial sight and blindness in the UK adult population, including the direct and indirect costs of partial sight and blindness, and the burden of partial sight and blindness on health. In addition, the report completes an international comparison (Australia, US, Japan, and Canada) and several cost effectiveness analyses on strategic interventions that are expected to prevent and ameliorate the impact of sight loss in the UK adult population. Useful figures and tables are provided to present the results

Gender & eye health : equal access to care

VISION 2020
2009

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The long-term goal is to achieve global gender equity in the use of eye care services and service outcomes. There is good evidence that in most developing countries, women are less likely to receive eye care services than men, particularly services that will prevent or treat blinding conditions. Added to the fact that women comprise more than half of the elderly population, and that the natural incidence of some blinding diseases (cataract and trachoma) is higher among women than men, this results in a situation where women account for 60-65 per cent of blind people worldwide. While there have been some successful programmes to improve gender equity in eye care, a more systematic approach needs to be adopted

Future sight loss UK (2) : an epidemiological and economic model for sight loss in the decade 2010 to 2020

MINASSIAN, Darwin
REIDY, Angela
2009

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This report provides estimates of the numbers of persons that were likely to have age-related macular disease, cataract, diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma at two points in time 2010 and 2020. Estimates of the baseline and cumulative costs to society of the prevailing health and social care provision and support in that time frame are provided using a cost of illness approach from the societal perspective. Useful figures and tables are provided to present the results

Community Eye Health : an international journal to promote eye health worldwide : issues 25-42 1998-2002

INTERNATIONAL CENTRE FOR EYE HEALTH
2003

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This CD-ROM contains back issues of the Journal of Community Eye Health, a continuing education resource for eye health workers in developing countries. Each issue has an editorial, review articles and updates on a specific theme as well as reports, abstracts, letters and reviews on other themes. The Journal supports the WHO-led Vision 2020 programme through the dissemination of up-to-date information about the priority diseases and strategies identified by Vision 2020. Back issues are also available through the ICEH website

Helping children who are blind : family and community support for children with vision problems|Ayudar a los niños ciegos : apoyo familiar y comunitario para niños con problemas de la vista

NIEMANN, Sandy
JACOB, Namita
2000

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Children develop faster in the first five years of life than any other time, and children who are blind need extra help so they can learn how to use their other senses to explore, learn and interact with the world. The simple activities in this book can help families, health workers, and individuals to support children with vision impairment to develop their capabilities. Topics include: assessing how much a child can see; preventing blindness; helping a child move around safely; activities of daily living; preparing for childcare or school; and supporting the parents of blind children. The book is written in an easy-to-read style with illustrations and examples from southern countries

Active old age [whole issue]

HEALTHLINK WORLDWIDE
Ed
1999

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This issue of CBR News addresses the issue of ageing. It contains articles on staying active in old age, answers to common questions about ageing, older people as carers, cataracts, dementia, and the identification of elder people's needs. A Fact File section on page 6 looks at the reasons for older people being at risk from HIV/AIDS

A visible form of charity

KALE, Rajendra
1994

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This article is in response to a BBC documentary and the author suggests that health camps, which is one way of searching India' s rural patients, perhaps have different motives. The author suggests that most are done for charity and good will but they are only temporary and have inadequate follow-up

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