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The key informant child disability project in Bangladesh and Pakistan

MACTAGGART, Islay
MURTHY, GVS
2013

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The Key Informant Method (KIM) has previously been tested by CBM, LSHTM and others, and found to be a valid method for the identification of children with severe visual impairment and blindness in Bangladesh, using community volunteers in the place of a door-to-door survey. This report outlines a study that set out to expand this and test whether voluntary, community-level Key Informants (KIs) could be trained to effectively identify children with moderate or severe physical impairments, sensory impairments (visual and hearing) or epilepsy in Bangadesh and Pakistan, and if so whether this process could be used to assess prevalence and plan appropriate referral services for children meeting these criteria

Mainstreaming disability in the new development paradigm : evaluation of Norwegian support to promote the rights of persons with disabilities

INGDAL, Nora
NILSSON, Annika
2012

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"This report is the result of an external and independent evaluation of the Norwe¬gian Support to Promote the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in the last 11 years. The intention of the evaluation is to analyse the results of targeted and mainstreamed initiatives towards achieving the rights of persons with disabilities...The methodology included field visits in the four case countries: Malawi, Nepal, the Palestinian territory and Uganda to obtain a deeper understanding of how the rights of persons with disabilities have been promoted, and estimate the possible contributions of the Norwegian support. Afghanistan was included as a desk study"
Note: The report is available electronically and in printed version. A braille copy can be downloaded from the web. The four country reports, written in English, are available electronically. The summaries of the country studies are made available electronically, with translations to the relevant local languages Nepali, Arabic and Chewa. In addition an easy-read version in English and Norwegian of the main report is available electronically

Are current guidelines for categorization of visual impairment in India appropriate?

MONGA, Parveen K
et al
October 2009

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Visual disability in India is categorised based on severity, and sometimes the disabled person does not fit unambiguously into any of the categories.  This study aimed to identify and quantify disability that does not fit in the current classification, and propose a new classification that includes all levels of vision. The research team found that around 10% of patients did not fall within did not fall within any of the existing categories, forcing the disability board to use its own judgement, and resulting in a tenancy to over-garde the disability. The authors propose a classification based on the national program in India for control of blindness' definition of normal vision (20/20 to 20/60), low vision ( < 20/60 to 20/200), economic blindness ( < 20/200 to 20/400) and social blindness ( < 20/400). It ranges from the mildest disability (normal vision in one eye, low vision in the other) up to the most severe grade (social blindness in both eyes).  The article concludes by acknowledging that the current classification of visual disabilities does not include all combinations of vision; some disabled patients cannot be categorised. The classification proposed by the authors is comprehensive, progresses logically, and follows the definitions of the national India program

Indian Journal of Ophthalmology, Vol 57, Issue 6

The efficacy of community based rehabilitation for children with or at significant risk of intellectual disabilities in low and middle income countries : a review

ROBERTSON, Janet
EMERSON, Eric
HATTON, Chris
August 2009

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"The aim of the present review is to summarise evidence regarding the efficacy of CBR in relation to one particular ‘high risk’ group of disabled children; children with intellectual disabilities (ID)...Only 10 studies were identified for inclusion in the review of research on the effectiveness of CBR for children and adolescents with ID and these are summarised in Appendix Two. An examination of reviews on the effectiveness of CBR for all people with disabilities points to two main reasons for this low level of evidence. Firstly, CBR has not been the subject of a significant amount of rigorous evaluation. Secondly, children and adolescents with ID have not been the recipients of significant amounts of CBR. We will discuss the reviews on the effectiveness of CBR generally and indicate what they say about ID before outlining the extremely small amount of information available on the effectiveness of CBR for children and adolescents with ID"
CeDR Research Report 2009:4

Evaluation of a pilot community based rehabilitation training programme in East Timor

SHAMROCK , Jane
July 2009

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"The first Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR) training programme in East Timor was held in Dili between March 2006 and August 2007 based on the Community Approaches to Handicap in Development (CAHD) model. This article presents the results of an evaluation of the training by studying the impact of the CBR training on the trainees. The evaluation was completed by (a) investigating how the trainee CBR workers experienced their training period, (b) describing the work of the 12 active CBR workers and (c) commenting on the value of the CAHD toolkit as a basis for the CBR training. The evaluation found that CBR workers were providing a variety of CBR interventions with some errors occurring because of insufficient skills in assessment, problem solving, monitoring and evaluation. The CAHD toolkit was found to be a useful framework for the training programme with changes needed in response to the needs of the trainees"
Asia Pacific Disability Rehabilitation Journal, Vol 20, No 2

Case study on addressing sanitation needs of disabled people in Nepal

SHRESTHA, Guna Raj
January 2006

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This is an evaluation report of a pilot project in rural Nepal that developed, tested and ensured accessible latrines to disabled people. The report details and describes individualised adapatations for household latrines. It would be useful to people interested in accessible latrines for disabled people.
The project was implemented by WaterAid Nepal's partner NEWAH

Telling stories, understanding lives, working toward change

COPLEY, Kath
HAYLOR, Graham
SAVAGE, William
December 2005

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This paper considers the importance of listening to people's stories when working towards improving the lives and livelihoods of individuals and communities. "Stories are helping us learn more about the livelihoods of the fishers and farmers with whom we work in eastern India. We are engaged with these communities in processes and activities aimed at improving their lives and promoting changes in government policy and service delivery in aquaculture and fisheries. Stories are told in several languages by women and men who fish and farm, about their lives, their livelihoods and significant changes they have experienced. We also record stories as narrated to us by colleague-informants. The written and spoken word, photographs, drawings and films - all are used to document the stories of people’s lives, sometimes prompted by questions as simple as 'What do people talk about in the village?' Through the power of language, stories can be an entry point into livelihoods programming, monitoring and evaluation, conflict transformation and ultimately a way of giving life to a rights-based approach to development"

Promoting rights-based approaches : experiences and ideas from Asia and the Pacific

THEIS, Joachim
2004

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This book is a collection of experiences with rights-based approaches from Asia and the Pacific. Part One looks at rights-based programming, and provides a general overview of rights-based approaches and their history. This is followed by a review of experiences of different rights-based organisations. Part Two translates human rights principles and standards into practical ideas for education and HIV/AIDS programming and for organisational development and management. Part Three presents four examples of rights-based programmes: promoting children’s participation in Vietnam, the Child Friendly District initiative in Ho Chi Minh City, confronting discrimination in South Asia and strengthening accountability for children’s rights through mass media. Part Four presents experiences and experiments with tools for rights-based analysis, planning, monitoring and evaluation. There is also a section on web resources on rights-based approaches, which lists some of the major organisations that are promoting rights-based approaches to development and relief work

Placement of job-seekers with disabilities : elements of an effective service. Asian and Pacific edition

MURRAY, Barbara
HERON, Robert
2003

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Job placement services for disabled people have been the focus of increasing global attention as awareness about the difficulty disabled people have in seeking jobs has grown. This book gives background to job placement services and describes the necessary policy and legislative framework for these services to be effective. The four key components of a job placement service (preparation for jobs, job placement, self-employment and publicity and promotion) are described, and monitoring and evaluation of the service are explained.

Multi-country evaluation of IMCI effectiveness, cost and impact (MCE) : progress report May 2000-April 2001

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO). Department of Child and Adolescent Health and Development
2001

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Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) is a strategy for improving the health of children. The objectives of the multi-country evaluation (MCE) are to evaluate the impact of the IMCI strategy on child health, and the cost-effectiveness of the strategy. The report provides a summary of the evaluation work to date and directions for the future. The chapters cover the methods used in the MCE, summaries of progress and plans in each of the four countries where the evaluation has taken place, and a list of the products of the MCE in terms of evaluation tools, capacity building and the establishment of new knowledge about IMCI implementation. These demonstrate how the MCE is strengthening the knowledge base and capacity for child health programming in developing countries

Multiple disability initiative review : at Dehradun Cheshire Home Northern India

RAJENDRA, K R
2001

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The management of children with multiple disabilities demands very special training and the Multiple Disability Initiative aimed to do this by running a series of training sessions over a 2 year period. At the end of the 2 years a special workshop was organised to share the experiences of the Dehradun Cheshire Home (DDCH) and also provide some training for staff. It helped DDCH to plan for its future growth and for the continuation of the programme at other homes

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