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Operationalizing the 2030 agenda : ways forward to improve monitoring and evaluation of disability inclusion

UNITED NATIONS DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL AFFIARS (UNDESA)
2015

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This note concerns monitoring and evaluation of disability and inclusion in light of the sustainable development goals. The note identifies steps which can be taken by individual countries and the international community as a whole to address the gaps in data disaggregation and collection concerning people with disabilities. The note concludes with a discussion of possible ways forward for better monitoring and evaluation for disability inclusion in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development

Measuring quality of life, safety, and social and family participation of project beneficiaries : the ScoPeO tool

BRUS, Aude
et al
July 2014

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"This guide presents ScoPeO, a tool for measuring changes in living conditions as perceived by beneficiaries once a project is implemented. More specifically, the method serves to evaluate quality of life, perception of safety and participation in society and family life in two phases: before or at the start of the project (baseline survey) and at the end of the project (endline survey). Thus, this guide presents concepts related to quality of life and similar notions, the key phases in the process and provides the tools needed to conduct a study on quality of life. This guide is designed for all Handicap International professionals, and in particular the project managers, operational coordinators and technical coordinators in charge of developing, implementing, monitoring and evaluating projects. Handicap International partners may also find this guide useful"

The key informant child disability project in Bangladesh and Pakistan

MACTAGGART, Islay
MURTHY, GVS
2013

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The Key Informant Method (KIM) has previously been tested by CBM, LSHTM and others, and found to be a valid method for the identification of children with severe visual impairment and blindness in Bangladesh, using community volunteers in the place of a door-to-door survey. This report outlines a study that set out to expand this and test whether voluntary, community-level Key Informants (KIs) could be trained to effectively identify children with moderate or severe physical impairments, sensory impairments (visual and hearing) or epilepsy in Bangadesh and Pakistan, and if so whether this process could be used to assess prevalence and plan appropriate referral services for children meeting these criteria

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