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Practical lessons from four projects on disability-inclusive development programming

COE, Sue
WAPLING, Lorraine
September 2010

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This article examines lessons learned from the inclusion of disabled people, based on socially inclusive principles, in programme work in Angola, Armenia, Cambodia, and Senegal. Seven key lessons have been highlighted from externally led reviews and evaluations. The findings include the 'substantial effect of stakeholders’ attitudes on practical implementation, the importance of authentic consultation with a range of disabled people, appropriate budgetary considerations and a need for caution regarding livelihoods work.' This article is useful for practitioners interested in the inclusion of disabled people in development programming

CBR stories from Africa : what can they teach us?

COLERIDGE, Angela
HARTLEY, Sally
Eds
2010

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"Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR) is an evolving concept. Its effectiveness depends on continuous reflection, debate and learning. This book aims to facilitate this process through the stories of five CBR programmes in Africa, told by those involved with the programmes and reflected on with honesty...Each of the five programmes has been invited to document their work, describing how its programme started and assessing the effectiveness of the approach it has chosen. They were asked to identify their successes and challenges, and to reflect on how difficulties are being overcome. Life stories illustrate the impact each approach can have on individual lives. The book offers itself as a reflective tool, to be used by practitioners. Each chapter asks specific questions of its readers, inviting them to draw comparisons with their own programme. The concluding section of the book outlines ideas for evaluating and developing their CBR programmes"

Joining hands: integrating gender and HIV/AIDS: report of an ACORD project using Stepping Stones in Angola, Tanzania and Uganda

HADJIPATERAS, Angela
et al
July 2007

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This is the report of a two-year project to reduce the vulnerability of women and girls in Africa to HIV and AIDS, using Stepping Stones - a gender-focused participatory process that involves working closely with peer groups. The project's other objectives were to: build the capacity of local structures to respond; promote community responses through effective partnerships and advocacy actions; and find out whether Stepping Stones could be used effectively in unconventional settings with a range of population groups such as the nomadic Mucubai tribe in Southern Angola, internally displaced people living in camps in Northern Uganda, and the 21st Battalion of the Angolan armed forces. Key findings include: improvements in the level of knowledge and understanding of HIV/AIDS and increased communication around sexual issues and between couples and within communities, across all three countries, as well as an increased sense of community responsibility for HIV and AIDS. In addition there was patchy evidence of stigma reduction and some reduction in risky cultural and sexual practices. Although increased respect for women, including self respect and a reduction in gender violence was also noted, female subordination in decision making and control over resources remains. Stepping Stones was on the whole considered to be adaptable for use in a wide range of contexts although more thought was needed to develop effective strategies to combat obstacles when using this process in some circumstances

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