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Asia Education Summit on Flexible Learning Strategies for Out-of-School Children

UNESCO
November 2016

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The Asia Education Summit on Flexible Learning Strategies for Out-of-School Children (24-26 February 2016) brought more than 550 education and learning colleagues from across the Asian Region and world to Bangkok, Thailand. The Summit welcomed 121 speakers and over 100 government officials. More than two-thirds of the Summit’s participants were NGO representatives and educators in the region who were, and currently are working “on the ground” in efforts with and for out-of-school children (OOSC).  This report aims to highlight and give voice to the unique innovative initiatives and flexible learning strategies shared during the course of this three-day summit. Each presentation summary in this report is intended to stand alone, while contributing to the collaborative nature and understanding of the innovations and FLS for OOSC presented. Presentations inlcuded "Sustainable and Innovative Financing for Disabled and Disadvantaged OOSC in Thailand: Mae Hong Son Model"

Inclusive disaster risk management : governments, communities and groups acting together

UNITED NATIONS (UN)
March 2015

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This Issue Brief, presented in advance of the United Nations (UN) Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction, outlines the UN position on the importance of developing more inclusive Disaster Risk Management (DRM) strategies. After initially outlining the importance of inclusivity, the paper goes on the present a number of key ways forward, including greater capacity development, greater understanding of risk, and the creation of innovative partnerships and institutional relationships

UN World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction

14-18 March 2015

Sendai, Japan

Making schools inclusive : how change can happen|Save the Children's experience

PINNOCK, Helen
LEWIS, Ingrid
2008

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This report looks at how non-governmental organisations (NGOs) can help school systems in developing countries become more inclusive. It shares experience of developing tools and approaches that have improved education for the most excluded children in society. Taking examples from 13 countries around the world it describes case study programmes that: target specific groups of vulnerable children; build inclusive school communities; promote change throughout an education system; and address financial barriers to inclusive education. This report will be of interest to policy-makers, managers and advisers in government, donors and NGOs, and to education students

Tackling social exclusion in health and education : case studies from Asia

GARDENER, Janet
SUBRAHMANIAN, Ramya
July 2006

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This paper draws together some of the lessons from a study to identify ways of tackling social exclusion through promising practices in health and education in the Asia region. It uncovers some of the processes through which ethnic minorities, disadvantaged castes, the ultra-poor, women and migrants have been excluded; outlines the ways in which projects have identified social exclusion and found ways to realign incentives for greater inclusion; and seeks to draw programmatic lessons for the design and implementation of more effective responses

Indigenous rights : young children

SOURCE INTERNATIONAL INFORMATION SUPPORT CENTRE
2006

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This Key list highlights essential information resources on the rights of indigenous children. Indigenous children are often part of the 'excluded and invisible' group as described in UNICEF’s State of the World's Children report in 2006, and are discriminated against on the basis of ethnicity. Specific areas of concern around indigenous rights include the rights of indigenous children to survival and development, to good health, to education that respects their cultural identity, to protection from abuse, violence and exploitation, and participation in decision-making processes relevant to their lives. At the same time, however, indigenous children possess special resources as custodians of a multitude of cultures, languages, beliefs and knowledge systems. The Convention on the Rights of the Child aims to protect this through article 30 on the right of minority or indigenous children to learn about and practice their own culture, language and religion. The most effective initiatives to promote the rights of indigenous children build upon these elements

Disability in development : experiences in inclusive practices

CHRISTOFFEL-BLINDENMISSION
HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL
Eds
2006

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This book has been developed from an initiative between two organisations specialising in disability and development; Handicap International and Christoffel-Blindenmission. The initiative promotes 'Community Approaches to Handicap in Development (CAHD)'. CAHD is grounded in the social model of disability, using a rights-based approach to promote the inclusion of disability into mainstream development activity. This approach places emphasis on the role of communities in addressing the social and physical barriers faced by people with disabilities. The book describes the positive impact of CAHD projects in India, Bangladesh, Nepal and the Philippines. A diverse range of partners, in particular people with disabilities, their families and local communities have been actively involved in its publication. The book would be useful for anybody with an interest in development theory, policy and practice

School readiness : closing racial and ethnic gaps [whole issue]

2005

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Research findings suggest that what happens to children early in life has a profound impact on their later achievement. This collection of articles focus on ethnicity and show that by focusing on essential aspects of children's lives before they enter school, we might ultimately be able to close the racial and ethnic gaps in educational outcomes

Improving support for black disabled people : lessons from community organisations on making change happen

SINGH, Becca
2005

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“This study reviews the JRF’s Making Change Happen programme, which provided a year’s funding to four grassroots development organisations with a track record in providing support to black disabled people. The report sets out the learning that emerged from the four development projects. It includes: overviews of the four development projects; learning and common themes, with boxed illustrations from the projects; detailed case studies from two of the projects; practical pointers and suggestions for voluntary and community organisations wishing to improve support to black and minority ethnic disabled people; and some questions for funders and service providers to consider”

Bilingual education in Israel. Final report

BEKERMAN, Zvi
HORENCZYK, Gabriel
November 2001

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Prospects would appear bleak for attempts to create common educational spaces for Jewish and Arab children, educators and parents in contemporary Israel. The two Jewish Arab schools in Jerusalem and Galilee were set up by the Centre for Jewish Arab Education in Israel (also known as Hand in Hand) in 1998 and have flourished in their modest way, although post-Oslo optimism has given way to heightened tension. This report is analytical and it illuminates the opportunities and challenges of such an endeavour

Mae Chan workshop on integrated community mobilization towards effective multisectoral HIV/AIDS prevention and care

HOLLERTZ, Victoria
2000

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Report of the proceedings of a workshop aiming to build the capacities of health and social workers, and community leaders to mobilise their communities towards HIV prevention and care. The participants were selected from rural communities with the potential for a community-based approach. The workshop examined the community response model, and enabled participants to learn from the experinces of the participating countries and develop follow-up actions

The two faces of education in ethnic conflict : towards a peacebuilding education for children

BUSH, Kenneth
SALTARELLI, Diana
Ed
2000

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This document challenges a widely-held assumption that education is inevitably a force for good. While stressing the many stabilising aspects of good quality education, editors Kenneth Bush and Diana Saltarelli show how education can be manipulated to drive a wedge between people, rather than drawing them closer together. This Innocenti Insight outlines the negative and positive faces of education in situations of tension or violence, including the denial of education as a weapon of war (negative) and the cultivation of inclusive citizenship (positive). It emphasises the need for peacebuilding education. The publication is about children of all ages, but it also discusses the creation of ethnic identity from an early age (section 1), and gives examples of the destruction of primary schools as a weapon of war (p.11)

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