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Does inequality in health impede growth?

GRIMM, Michael
May 2010

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This paper investigates the effects of inequality in health on economic growth in low and middle income countries. It uses data from 62 low and middle income countries over the period 1985 to 2007, which show a substantial and relatively robust negative effect of health inequality on income levels and income growth controlling for life expectancy, country and time fixed-effects and a large number of other effects that have been shown to matter for growth. The paper concludes that increasing access to health care for the poor can make a substantial contribution to economic growth not only through its effect on life expectancy but also through its effect on reduced health inequality

World health statistics 2010

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
2010

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This annual compilation of health-related data for the World Health Organization's 193 member states, includes a summary of the progress made towards achieving the health-related Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and associated targets

Enduring war and health inequality in Sri Lanka

VIJE, Mayan
RATNESWAREN, Suppiah
March 2009

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This evidence-based report examines the wider impact of war on the health of the population and the violation of human rights in the conflict zones of North-East Sri Lanka. Over 25 years, public health has deteriorated due to ruined infrastructure, the exodus of health care professionals and mass displacement of people. The report concludes with recommendations to the main players in the conflict, including the Sri Lankan Government and the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE), the international community and UN organisations working on health

World health report 2008|Primary health care : now more than ever

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
2008

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This report considers four sets of reforms that reflect a convergence between the values of primary health care, the expectations of citizens and the common health performance challenges that cut across all contexts. These include: universal coverage reforms, service delivery reforms, public policy reforms, and leadership reforms. "While universally applicable, these reforms do not constitute a blueprint or a manifesto for action. The details required to give them life in each country must be driven by specific conditions and contexts, drawing on the best available evidence"

Poverty, equity, human rights and health

BRAVEMAN, Paula
GRUSKIN, Sofia
2003

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Those concerned with poverty and health have sometimes viewed equity and human rights as abstract concepts with little practical application, and links between health, equity and human rights have not been examined systematically. This article outlines five ways in which health institutions can deal with poverty and health: institutionalising the systematic and routine application of equity and human rights perspectives to all health sector actions; strengthening and extending the public health functions that create the conditions necessary for health; implementing equitable health care financing, which should reduce poverty while increasing access for the poor; ensuring that health services respond effectively to the major causes of preventable ill-health among the poor and disavantaged; and monitoring, advocating and taking action to address the potential health equity and human rights implications of policies in all sectors affecting health, not only the health sector

Reshaping health care in Latin America : a comparative analysis of health care reform in Argentina, Brazil and Mexico

FLEURY, Sonia
BELMARTINO, Susana
BARIS, Enis
Eds
2000

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This book assesses the health care reforms of the past decade in Argentina, Brazil and Mexico. The authors are in agreement that reform in the governance, management and financing of the provision of health services was essential. However, they criticize the outcomes of the reform process not only for the anticipated exacerbation of social and economic inequalities, but also because of inattention paid to human resources as well as much-needed development of science and technology

Global health observatory (GHO)

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)

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The Global Health Observatory (GHO) provides access to WHO's global health-related statistics. The aim of the GHO is to: compile and verify major sources of health data; provide easy access to country data and metadata; present scientifically sound information in user-friendly formats. Specific areas are provided for theme pages, a data repository, reports, country statistics, a map gallery and standards

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