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Leaving no-one behind: Building inclusive social protection systems for persons with disabilities

KIDD, Stephen
et al
February 2019

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This report identifies a wide range of barriers persons with disabilities experience in accessing social protection to be overcome. It calls for better data on disability, disability-specific and old age pension schemes and expanded coverage; adapting communications about social protection schemes; and improving disability assessment mechanisms. The project involved a review of the literature, an analysis of household survey datasets, and consultations with key stakeholders and persons with disabilities in seven low- and middle-income countries: Brazil, India, Kenya, Mauritius, Rwanda, South Africa and Zambia.

DRPI Manual: Roadmap to Work. A model for persons with disabilities

RIOUX, Marcia
et al
January 2019

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DRPI AWARE (Disability Rights Promotion International Asian Workplace Approach that Respects Equality): Roadmap to Work is aimed at individuals and organizations committed to the employment rights of persons with disabilities. DRPI AWARE is a collaborative six year project promoting access to opportunities in the labour force for people with disabilities. With an evidence-based understanding of the reasons for the under-employment, unemployment, and precarious employment, DRPI AWARE works with employers to increase job opportunities for people with disabilities in Dhaka (Bangladesh), Kathmandu (Nepal) and Hyderabad (India). The DRPI AWARE project team is sharing this model because it has been tested and used in India, Nepal, and Bangladesh with significant success. It represents a new way forward for realizing the employment rights of people with disabilities and ensuring jobs for people with disabilities. The model can be used as a guide by others who are designing new, or revamping existing, employment projects, strategies, schemes, programs, and inclusive employment practices. This manual provides lessons learned and the outcomes of the DRPI AWARE project and proposes a model for building an inclusive employment ecosystem. It calls for a new way of thinking about disability and of how to ensure a larbour market that equally welcomes all, including those with disabilities.

Realisation of sustainable development goals by, for and with persons with disabilities: UN flagship report on disability and development 2018

UNITED NATIONS DEPARTMENT FOR ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL AFFAIRS (UNDESA)
December 2018

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This report represents the first UN systemwide effort to examine disability and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development at the global level. The report reviews data, policies and programmes and identifies good practices; and uses the evidence it reviewed to outline recommended actions to promote the realization of the SDGs for persons with disabilities. Over 200 experts from UN agencies and International Financial Institutions, Member States and civil society, including research institutions and organizations of persons with disabilities, contributed to this report. The report covers new areas for which no global research was previously available, for example, the role of access to energy to enable persons with disabilities to use assistive technology. It also contains the first global compilation and analysis of internationally comparable data using the Washington Group on Disability Statistics short set of questions. Reviews of legislation from 193 UN Member States were conducted and analysed for this report to highlight good practices and to assess the current status of discriminatory laws on voting, election for office, right to marry and others

Minimum standards for protection, gender and inclusion in emergencies

INTERNATIONAL FEDERATION OF RED CROSS AND RED CRESCENT SOCIETIES (IFRC)
November 2018

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The International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) Minimum standards for protection, gender and inclusion in emergencies (2018) is in its second edition. The first pilot version of the IFRC Minimum standard commitments to gender and diversity in emergency programming was published in 2015. The pilot version has been tested globally by Red Cross and Red Crescent staff, volunteers and management in low-, medium- and high-scale disasters and humanitarian crises. This edition is the result of three years of testing, revision and feedback from protection, gender and inclusion (PGI) and sectoral specialists. New chapters, such as cash-based interventions, have been added as well as a stronger focus on sexual and gender-based violence and disability inclusion to align with the commitments of the IFRC and its member National Societies. This edition is accompanied by the IFRC Protection, gender and inclusion in emergencies toolkit (2018–2019).

This guidance presents Red Cross and Red Crescent staff, members and volunteers with a set of minimum standards for protection, gender and inclusion (PGI) in emergencies. It aims to ensure that the emergency programming of the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) and National Societies provides dignity, access, participation and safety for all people affected by disasters and crises.

It provides practical guidance on how to mainstream these four principles in all sectors, based on a consideration of gender, age, disability and other diversity factors. This includes limiting people’s exposure to the risks of violence and abuse and ensuring that emergency programmes “do no harm”.

The standards address protection, gender and inclusion concerns by providing practical ways to engage with all members of the community, respond to their differing needs and draw on their capacities in the most non-discriminatory and effective way. This helps to ensure that local perspectives guide assistance delivery. The standards also support incorporation of the seven Fundamental Principles of the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement.

At risk of exclusion from CRPD and SDGs implementation: Inequality and persons with deafblindness. Initial global report on situation and rights of persons with deafblindness

JENSEN, Rune
et al
September 2018

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Representing between 0.2% to 2% of the population, persons with deafblindness are a very diverse yet hidden group and are, overall, more likely to be poor and unemployed, and with lower educational outcomes. Because deafblindness is less well-known and often misunderstood, people struggle to obtain the right support, and are often excluded from both development and disability programmes. This initial global report on the situation of persons with deafblindness seeks to start a dialogue between international disability rights and development stakeholders, and is based on research undertaken by the World Federation of the Deafblind (WFDB) combining the largest population-based analysis of persons with deafblindness conducted to date (disaggregation of 22 population-based surveys from low, middle and high-income countries), an academic literature review, two surveys conducted among members and partners of WFDB and Sense International. Women and men with deafblindness from across the world took part in the Helen Keller World Conference in June 2018, and were consulted to confirm the findings and elaborate on the recommendations for this report.

 

Data and discussion are presented on people with deafblindess and: inequality; poverty; work; education; health; participation on political and public life; and social life. Datasets are included. 

 

Disability inclusion and accountability framework

McCLAIN-NHLAPO, Charlotte
et al
June 2018

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The main objective of the Disability Inclusion and Accountability Framework is to support the mainstreaming of disability in World Bank activities. It lays out a road map for (a) including disability in the Bank's policies, operations and analytical work, and (b) building internal capacity for supporting clients in implementing disability-inclusive development programs. The primary target audience of the Framework is Bank staff but it is also relevant to the Bank's client countries, development partners and persons with disabilities. The framework provides four main principles for guiding the World Bank’s engagement with persons with disabilities: nondiscrimination and equality, accessibility, inclusion and participation, and partnership and collaboration. 

 

The appendices to this framework highlight key areas in which the Bank can have a significant impact on the inclusion, empowerment, and full participation of persons with disabilities. These areas include transport, urban development, disaster risk management, education, social protection, jobs and employment, information and communication technology, water sector operations, and health care. 


Report No. 126977
 

Inclusive urban mobility and getting to work safely in developing countries

HUMANITY & INCLUSION (HI)
June 2018

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The lack of safe and accessible roads in many cities in developing countries impacts negatively on employment opportunities for persons with disabilities. Between 20 to 50 million people worldwide suffer non-fatal injuries in road crashes every year; around 1.25 million are killed. Unsafe roads also represent a major factor of social exclusion, especially for ‘vulnerable road users’. These include notably pedestrians, persons with disabilities, cyclists and children. They represent 46% of road casualties. Persons with disabilities are at higher risk of sustaining injuries from road crashes.

 

In this thematic brief, the importance of inclusive urban planning is emphasised. Urban mobility and road safety challenges discussed include: safe crossing points over roads; signage and information; collective transport (particularly buses); accessing buildings such as offices or retail and driving with a disability.

 

Case histories provided are: Accessible transport as part of an inclusive jobs program in Senegal; and Modified vehicles and driving licenses for drivers with disabilities in Vietnam

 

Recommendations for improvements in policies and actions are given under the headings: 

1. Strengthening the policy and financial framework for safe and inclusive mobility action, based on evidence and through participative processes

2. Removing the barriers to safe and accessible mobility, focusing on: the built environment; transport and vehicles; people

Education, work, and motherhood in low and middle income countries: A review of equality challenges and opportunities for women with disabilities

TEFERA, Belaynesh
et al
March 2018

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This systematic review examined the equality challenges and opportunities for women with disabilities in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) to participate and succeed in education, employment, and motherhood. The search of Web of Science, PsychINFO, Google Scholar, and MEDLINE databases yielded 24 articles, which were subsequently passed through open, axial, and selective coding. The resulting review found that women with disabilities in LMICs have severe difficulty participating and succeeding in education, employment, and motherhood. 

 

Social Inclusion, Vol 6, No 1, 82–93

Labour market inclusion of people with disabilities: Paper presented at the 1st Meeting of the G20 Employment Working Group

INTERNATIONAL LABOUR ORGANISATION (ILO)
ORGANISATION FOR ECONOMIC COOPERATION AND DEVELOPMENT (OECD)
February 2018

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A common understanding of how to approach the employment of persons with disabilities in a way that respects social justice, human rights and decent work as a key element of more inclusive economies and societies is sought. Having the employment of persons with disabilities on the G20 agenda is also a reflection of the increased attention to the rights of persons with disabilities both at a national as well as at an international level. The contribution focuses on one particular group of people with disabilities, namely those who may have been born with disabilities or may have developed some during their lives, but either way have remaining work capacities and are at working age. 

Employment-to-population ratio statistics for persons with and without disabilities are provided for some of the G20 countries. Economic and social determinants of low employment rates of people with disabilities are discussed.

 

Policies across G20 countries for the labour market inclusion of persons with disabilities are discussed

  • demand side - promoting disability inclusion within the private and public sector
  • supply side - ensuring that persons with disabilities have the skills as demanded by the labour market
  • making the environment more enabling 
  • mental health as a special challenge
  • measurement and quality data to inform evidence-based policies

 

Disability, health and human development

MITRA, Sophie
2018

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This open access book introduces the human development model to define disability and map its links with health and wellbeing, based on Sen’s capability approach. The author uses panel survey data with internationally comparable questions on disability for Ethiopia, Malawi, Tanzania and Uganda. It presents evidence on the prevalence of disability and its strong and consistent association with multidimensional poverty, mortality, economic insecurity and deprivations in education, morbidity and employment. It shows that disability needs to be considered from multiple angles including aging, gender, health and poverty. Ultimately, this study makes a call for inclusion and prevention interventions as solutions to the deprivations associated with impairments and health conditions.

 

Chapters include:

  • The Human Development Model of Disability, Health and Wellbeing
  • Measurement, Data and Country Context
  • Prevalence of Functional Difficulties
  • Functional Difficulties and Inequalities Through a Static Lens
  • Dynamics of Functional Difficulties and Wellbeing
  • Main Results and Implications

 

Disability and HIV

UNAIDS
August 2017

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This report highlights existing key evidence on the relationship between disability and HIV. It discusses the concrete steps needed for a person-centred, disability-inclusive HIV response that allows for increased participation of people with disabilities and integrates rehabilitation within the continuum of HIV care. Globally, it is estimated that 1 billion people (15% of the world’s population) have a disability. Of those aged over 15 years, approximately 110–190 million (2.2–3.8%) experience significant disabilities. Disability is increasing in prevalence due to ageing populations, trauma, accidents and the increase in chronic health conditions, including HIV. Persistent discrimination against and exclusion of people with disabilities, in particular women and girls with disabilities, increases their vulnerability, including their risk of HIV infection.
 

Zero Project report 2017. Employment work and vocational education & training

FEMBAK, Michael
et al
January 2017

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The results of the Zero Project Survey 2016–2017 consisting of 21 questions with a particular focus this year on employment and vocational and educational training are presented. After five years of Social Indicator research, for the first time data trends are published as well as comparisons between world regions. The Social Indicators section also includes analysis of data availability on youth employment with regards to Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 8, and of the “data gap” of persons with disabilities living in institutions. 56 Innovative Practices have been selected, and 13 common solutions and “threads” have been identified.  11 Innovative Policies have been selected, and 13 ways to create a significant impact have been identified.

 

Network on inclusive employment of people with disabilities

SHEKULO TOV
2017

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The establishment of an international digital network on inclusive employment of people with disabilities is proposed.

The main goals of this digital network are to:

  • Enhance strategic networking, engagement and dialogue among the different stakeholders around the world
  • Disseminate cutting edge knowledge, good practice and innovations through diverse formats
  • Actively involve people with disabilities in the promoting this issue in all levels.

Activities of the network to include: an electronic mailing list; a monthly webinar and presentations of new research findings and evidences and of policy papers and information material

UN CRPD: What is Art. 27 and the right to work?

MENTAL HEALTH EUROPE
2017

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This short animated video seeks to explain what Art 27 and the right to work and employment means for all people with disabilities, including people with psychosocial disabilities and focuses on the right to reasonable accommodation

Spotlight on Sustainable Development Goal 5: Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls - UN WOMEN 2017

UN WOMEN
2017

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Spotlights are made on areas of the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 5, to achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls, and specific targets and indicators are given. The spotlights are on intimate partner violence, harmful practices (including child marriage and female genital mutilation (FGM)), unpaid care and domestic work, women in leadership, sexual and reproductive health and the gender data gap. Data gaps are identified and a five year programme is outlined, Making Every Women and Girl Count, which is designed to provide technical and financial support to countries to improve the production and use of gender statistics in order to monitor the implementation of gender equality commitments in the 2030 Agenda.

The Functions of Disabled People’s Organisations (DPOs) in Low and Middle-income Countries: a Literature Review

YOUNG, Rebekah
REEVE, Mathew
GRILLS, Nathan
December 2016

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Purpose: The aim of this study was to review peer-reviewed literature on the roles and functions of Disabled Peoples’ Organisations (DPOs) in low and middle-income countries, and their outputs and outcomes for people with disabilities.

Method: Online databases were searched without date or language limiters (Medline, CINAHL, Scopus, Embase and Cochrane), using a combination of two key word search strategies. Eleven studies were selected for inclusion in this review on the basis of predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Included studies underwent quality assessment using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme (CASP) and Downs and Black’asss criteria for quality assessment. Data for thematic analysis was then grouped under the broad themes of: participation and factors that facilitate participation; development of partnerships and connections; and self-development and self-help.

Results: There was some evidence within the included studies to suggest that DPOs can produce significant, positive outcomes for persons with disability in terms of factors such as employment rates, access to microfinance and bank loans, accessibility of housing, acquisition of orthopaedic devices, involvement in civil society, development of friendships and networks, and participation in training programmes. Although the studies under review largely did not investigate the long-term impact of the reported DPO functions and outputs, some of the short-term outputs may be considered proximal indicators of outcomes such as increased empowerment and well-being. Conclusion: The 11 studies in this review suggested that DPOs can be effective in achieving their stated aims of promoting well-being, participation and rights of people with disabilities in low and middle- income countries.
 

Situation of wage employment of people with disabilities (Ten developing countries in focus)

HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL
December 2016

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One of the fundamental rights that is often denied to persons with disabilities is the right to employment. Based on 35 years of work with persons with disabilities in more than 60 developing countries, Handicap International has decided to study this issue of employment and disability. It challenges ten developing country teams to reach out to their local partners to capture the reality of employment today. This qualitative study gives very useful information about country teams’ vision of decent work for persons with disabilities in those environments where specialized resources are rare and inclusive policies remain in their infancy. Despite many obstacles, it identifies some positive promises and future tracks for better practices and efficient services. Many stakeholders, like local business and employment bureaus, are piloting innovative ways to get people to work, and to retain their skills as this positive dynamic evolves. Bringing these experiences to different audiences is the main goal of this document. Hopefully it will be the first piece of a more comprehensive data set and bank of best practices that reinforce access to decent jobs for people with disabilities wherever they happen to live in our global world.

Promoting diversity and inclusion through workplace adjustments: a practical guide

WONG Lisa
December 2016

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The purpose of a reasonable accommodation at work is not to unduly burden an employer, nor is it to grant one employee an unfair benefit or advantage over another. Reasonable accommodation in the workplace means providing one or more modifications or adjustments that are appropriate and necessary to accommodate a worker or job candidate’s individual characteristics or differences so that he or she may enjoy the same rights as others. Often, a reasonable accommodation may be made at little or no cost to an employer, and results in concrete benefits to both the employer and the worker.

When and how should a workplace accommodation be provided? When should a requested accommodation be considered both necessary and reasonable? This guide aims to assist employers of all sizes and in all economic sectors, to provide reasonable accommodation at all stages of the employment relationship, including in designing and advertising a vacancy, during selection and recruitment phase as well as during employment and in the context of return to work. This guide is a joint product of the Conditions of Work and Equality Department, the Governance and Tripartism Department and the International Labour Standards Department and is the third module in the ILO’s Promoting Equity series.

Human rights toolkit for women and girls with disabilities. First edition.

Women With Disabilities Australia (WWDA)
October 2016

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A Toolkit for women or girls with disabilities to learn more about human rights and how this knowledge can be used to achieve change in their own lives or the lives of others. Following an introduction about why this Toolkit is needed,  a brief overview of five key human rights issues that women and girls with disability in Australia have identified as most important to them is provided. Section 3 provides information about what human rights are and also gives a brief overview about Australia’s international human rights obligations. Sections 4 and 5 focus on the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) and the Convention on the Elimination of all forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW), examining the main ‘Article’ from each, that deals with the important urgent issues that have been identified by women with disability in Australia, which are: Violence; Decision-Making; Participation; Sexual and Reproductive Rights; and, Employment. For each of these issues, the words of the main Article (as it appears in the CRPD and CEDAW) are provided and explained in practical terms, and examples are given of what governments have to know and do. Information from WWDA members and supporters about some of the key changes which need to happen is given. Different ideas of what women and girls with disability can do to help achieve change and promote the rights of all women and girls with disability are given and some sample letters and ‘talking points’ for phone calls to a local Member of Parliament, or a government Minister or advisers are provided.   

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