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3rd World Disability & Rehabilitation Conference (WDRC 2018) - Book of abstracts

O'CONNOR, Loren
Ed
November 2018

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The 3rd World Disability & Rehabilitation Conference 2018 was held from 12th and 13th November 2018 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. People with disabilities and researchers, practitioners, policy makers, industry experts, university faculty and organizations along with advocates and volunteers working with people with disabilities participated and presented their original and unpublished results of conceptual, constructive, empirical, experimental, experiential or theoretical work through abstract and poster presentation. Total 33 participants presented their abstract and poster throughout this conference. The theme of WDRC 2018 was “Global advocacy and rights of people with disabilities”

Human rights toolkit for women and girls with disabilities. First edition.

Women With Disabilities Australia (WWDA)
October 2016

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A Toolkit for women or girls with disabilities to learn more about human rights and how this knowledge can be used to achieve change in their own lives or the lives of others. Following an introduction about why this Toolkit is needed,  a brief overview of five key human rights issues that women and girls with disability in Australia have identified as most important to them is provided. Section 3 provides information about what human rights are and also gives a brief overview about Australia’s international human rights obligations. Sections 4 and 5 focus on the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) and the Convention on the Elimination of all forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW), examining the main ‘Article’ from each, that deals with the important urgent issues that have been identified by women with disability in Australia, which are: Violence; Decision-Making; Participation; Sexual and Reproductive Rights; and, Employment. For each of these issues, the words of the main Article (as it appears in the CRPD and CEDAW) are provided and explained in practical terms, and examples are given of what governments have to know and do. Information from WWDA members and supporters about some of the key changes which need to happen is given. Different ideas of what women and girls with disability can do to help achieve change and promote the rights of all women and girls with disability are given and some sample letters and ‘talking points’ for phone calls to a local Member of Parliament, or a government Minister or advisers are provided.   

Post school transition : the experiences of students with disability

CHILDREN WITH DISABILITY AUSTRALIA (CDA)
December 2015

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The transition from school is an important period. All young people should be supported throughout this time to access options which allow them to meaningfully participate and contribute to our society as adults. Many young people with disability however have extremely poor post school transition experiences.

This report is based on the direct experience of young people with disability. The paper highlights key issues from current research, legislation and consultations with key stakeholders. It explores present and past school transition practices, barriers faced by students with disability and presents recommendations for improving outcomes and options for post school transition of students with disability

The economic benefits of increasing the employment for people with disability

DELOITTE ACCESS ECONOMICS
August 2011

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This report estimates the increase in economic output that could be achieved by increasing employment outcomes for people with disabilities…The economic modelling presented in this report suggests that closing the gap between labour market participation rates and unemployment rates for people with and without disabilities by one-third would result in a cumulative $43 billion increase in Australia’s GDP over the next decade in real dollar terms. The modelling also suggests that GDP will be around 0.85% higher over the longer term, which is equivalent to an increase in GDP in 2011 of $12 billion.

The policy and program mechanisms for achieving these outcomes are not explicitly addressed in this report, nor does it address the costs associated with achieving an increase in employment participation. Rather, the aim of this report is to present the potential benefits associated with increasing employment participation for people with disabilities and provide a reference point for future policy discussion

Disability issues in East Asia : review and ways forward

TAKAMINE, Yutaka
May 2004

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This paper provides "the World Bank’s East Asia and Pacific region with information and insights necessary for improving a focus on disability in its activities. There are two major parts to this paper. The first part reviews disability related issues in the region by describing (1) the prevalence of disability and related issues; (2) major issues and challenges confronting persons with disabilities; and (3) good practices, innovative approaches, and effective organizations in the region working to meet the needs of persons with disabilities. The second part reviews the Bank’s regional level activities through examining project portfolios and AAA products, as well as through interviews with Sector managers and staff members. Based on this review, the paper recommends ways to include disability issues at the regional and sector levels"

Moving forward : towards decent work for people with disabilities. Examples of good practices in vocational training and employment from Asia and the Pacific

PERRY, Debra
2003

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This book brings together more than 20 case-studies of programmes and approaches in helping disabled people gain skills, find employment and earn a living in the Asia-Pacific region. They include both centre- and community-based vocational training and income-generation programmes, employment services and partnerships

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