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Reimagining the workplace: disability and inclusive employment

LEONARD CHESHIRE
February 2019

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This UK based report examines the challenges and barriers facing disabled people throughout their working journey, as well as considering solutions to some of the key issues. Through our own research survey and interviews we look at the impact on disabled people where they cannot access adequate support as well as what works in improving their employment prospects

 

Topics discussed include: conditions of employment; preparing for work; falling out of work; and the performance of government based programmes.

 

ComRes interviewed in 2018 online 1,647 disabled adults in the UK, aged between 18 and 65, and in 2017 they interviewed 1,609 disabled adults. ComRes interviewed 503 UK line managers responsible for or involved in the recruitment process in 2018 and in 2017.  Between 1 December 2018 – 20 January 2019, Leonard Cheshire conducted in-depth telephone interviews with seven disabled people of working age about their experiences of employment. 

 

Recommendations are made throughout.

Economic impact of inclusion of disabled persons in the labour market

BEYER, STEPHEN
BEYER, ANNIE
2017

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This report studies a literature review of cost-benefit analyses from the tax payers perspective of the labour market's inclusion of people with disabilities. An extensive and structured overview of English language global literature (studies and research) in a period of over 30 years. Topics discussed include: a background to inclusive employment policies in the EU - active labour market programmes (ALMP s)  and their failure; study methodology; calculating financial costs and benefits; evidence that effective inclusive employment can be achieved for a variety of groups of peolpe with disabilities; impacts on other stakeholders and the transition from education to inclusive employment.

European Semester : Developing more inclusive labour markets for all?

EUROPEAN ASSOCIATION OF SERVICE PROVIDERS FOR PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES (EASPD)
November 2016

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This report examines why the European Semester should look further into the employment rates of persons with disabilities and which measures should be taken at national level to improve the current situation. An overview is given on employment and the UN CRPD and its meaning for the European Union (EU). What the EU is currently doing when it comes to developing more inclusive labour markets through its Employment policy and the European Semester process is examined. The assessment of the legal, political and economic arguments why the European Commission should do more in regard to the employment of persons with disabilities are presented. The economic arguments are also presented through a Study developed specifically for this report by Professor Stephen Beyer. Several ideas as to how the European Commission could focus more on this issue, with feasible and pragmatic recommendations are presented. Specific national messages from EASPD members are included on what changes are needed to tackle the significant unemployment rate of persons with disabilities throughout Europe; including in Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Finland, France, Greece, Ireland, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia and Spain.  

The autism employment gap report

The National Autistic Society
September 2016

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For nearly a decade, the full-time employment rate of autistic adults has stagnated. A survey we carried out in 2007 indicated that just 15% of autistic people were in full-time paid work. Shockingly, in this year’s survey, the figure was just 16%.

 

A similar number are in part-time employment, giving an overall employment rate of 32%. And while full-time work won’t be right for everyone on the autism spectrum, four in 10 of those working part-time feel under-employed. Others feel they are in low-skilled work and employers don’t see their abilities. They see their autism. They see a problem.

 

Meanwhile, employers have told us that they are worried about getting things wrong for autistic employees and that they don’t know where to go for advice. Autistic people are overloaded by too much information at work, and employers don’t have enough.

 

The UK Government has made a very welcome pledge to halve the disability employment gap by the end of this Parliament, meaning that they have to shift the disability employment rate from 47% to 64%. But the autism employment gap is even wider. For the number of autistic people in work to reach 64%, the Government will need to commit to doubling the number of autistic people in employment by 2020.

 

Both Government and employers need to take specific action to make this happen – without it, recent history tells us that autistic people will continue to be left behind

The Employment Equality Directive - European implementation assessment

TYMOKSKI, Jan
February 2016

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"The adoption of the Employment Equality Directive in 2000 extended the protection against discrimination provided under EU law. By explicitly obliging the Member States to prohibit discrimination in employment on the grounds of religion or belief, age, disability and sexual orientation, the general principles set out in the Treaties became more effective, and some minimum standards are now common throughout Europe. At the same time, specific exceptions with regard to all or only some of those grounds permit the continuation of certain measures that were already in place in most countries, which has led to different national practices, especially with regard to age. Additional provisions on horizontal issues such as access to justice and sanctions, dissemination of information and necessary dialogue, left the details to be established by Member States according to their laws and customs. This analysis builds on the available documents and expertise in order to facilitate the debate on the implementation of the Employment Equality Directive to date and on how best to follow it up" 

DOI: 10.2861/178997

 

The economic impact of inclusion in the open labour market for persons with disabilities

BEYER, Stephen
BEYER, Annie
2016

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"This study looks into the inclusion of persons with disabilities and its impact on the economy. Persons with disabilities have been included in mainstream, specialist and active labour market programmes over the years in the EU. During the first decade of 2000s, many countries have used the "Work First Approaches", which led people to work before any training. The work first approaches have during the previous times provided good employment without people having the skills. In recent times, an activation approach has been developed in order to ensure that people with more complex disabilities are included in the labour market. This created inclusion programmes that assist people in the job search process, like individual counselling, vocational rehabilitation etc". The report provides an extensive overview of studies and research on the economic impact inclusion in the open labour market for persons with disabilities can have for governments and public authorities and a more general overview assessing impact on businesses and individuals. This study provides a review of the relevant literature. Using standard methods, relevant articles in the English language (or with English language abstracts) were identified, published between 1980 and 2016. 
 

Using the disability symbol : a guide for employers

JOB CENTRE PLUS
September 2007

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The disability symbol is a means of communication in the UK that is intended to help inform employees, and other disabled people who might be interested in an organisation, that the employer has a positive approach to employing disabled people. This leaflet describes the disability symbol and provides information on the design and usage criteria for the symbol. This information is useful to employers in the UK

International best practices in universal design : a global review

DION, Betty
et al
August 2007

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This review provides an international overview of the technical information on accessibility criteria for the built environment that is being used by countries as they prepare to ratify the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. The document compares the accessibility codes and standards from 16 international jurisdictions, including the new standards from Canada and the USA, as well as standards from Mexico, Uruguay, Sweden, Ireland, Spain, South Africa, Bangladesh, Philippines, Malaysia, Singapore, Australia and Lebanon

HIV and your disability equality scheme : a practical guide for chief executives, board members and senior managers

NATIONAL AIDS TRUST (NAT)
2006

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This guide provides practical advice to chief executives, board members and senior managers of public bodies in the UK, who are developing or reviewing their disability equality scheme. It also offers important information relating to HIV, to enable public bodies to meet their general duty of promoting disability equality under the UK Disability Discrimination Act 2005

Alleviating poverty and building citizenship in South Africa through social security : what lessons from the UK experience?

VAN NIEKERK,, Robert
et al
2001

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This report consists of briefing papers submitted to the Committee of Inquiry into Social Security Reform in South Africa that addressthe system of social security in South Africa and identifies plausible options for reform. It borrows recommendations from the system of reform occurring in the UK, and where appropriate, also provides other international examples. This work would be useful for anyone with an interest in poverty reduction and welfare reform

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