Resources search

The wellbeing of children with developmental delay in Bangladesh, Bhutan, Laos, Nepal, Pakistan and Vietnam: An analysis of data from UNICEF’s Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys

EMERSON, Eric
SAVAGE, Amber
LLEWELLYN, Gwynnyth
December 2016

Expand view

This report, produced by the University of Sydney’s Centre for Disability Research and Policy (CDRP),
uses data collected in rounds four and five of UNICEF’s Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys programme (MICS) to describe the wellbeing of young children with and without developmental delay in six Asian countries. The United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) were used as a framework for identifying indicators of child wellbeing.

The report, authored by CDRP Disability and Inequity Stream Leader Professor Eric Emerson with Dr Amber Savage of the Family and Disability Studies Initiative, University of Alberta, Canada and CDRP Director Professor Gwynnyth Llewellyn, found that children with Developmental Delay in Bangladesh, Bhutan, Laos, Nepal, Pakistan and Vietnam are more likely than their peers to:
• Be living in poverty (SDG1). In five out the six countries children with developmental delay were more likely to be living in poverty than their peers
• Experience hunger (SDG2). In all six countries children with developmental delay were more likely to have experienced persistent severe hunger than their peers
• Suffer poor health (SDG3). On three indicators (poor peer relationships, diarrhoea and fever) children with developmental delay were more likely to have poor health than their peers. On three indicators (obesity, aggression and acute respiratory infections) there was no systematic difference between children with and without developmental delay.
• Experience barriers to quality education (SDG4). On all four indicators (attendance at early childhood education centre, family support for learning, access to learning materials in the home, maternal level of education) children with developmental delay were more disadvantaged than their peers.
• Experience barriers to clean water and sanitation (SDG6). On two indicators (improved sanitation, place to wash hands) children with developmental delay were more disadvantaged than their peers. On one indicator (improved drinking water) there was no systematic difference between children with and without developmental delay.

The authors noted that “Since the development of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC) in 1998, increased attention has been paid to monitoring the well-being of children. The UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD) and UNCRC both contain explicit provisions regarding the rights of children with disabilities. These impose obligations on governments to act to ensure that children with disabilities enjoy the same rights and opportunities as other children. In order to promote the visibility of children with disabilities, enable better policy, and monitor progress, disaggregation of data related to children’s well-being on the basis of disability is needed."

Our home is where the heart is : a young homemakers' guide

HOAEB, Aini N
LIYAMBULA, Aune S
STEINITZ, Lucy Y
July 2008

Expand view

This is a practical book for children and youth who are caring for others and managing a home. It is also intended as a guide for community caregivers, volunteers and relatives who oversee these households, and who voluntarily assist the children as much as possible

Child labour, education and health : a review of the literature

DORMAN, Peter
2008

Expand view

This paper reviews the rapidly-expanding literature on the relationships between child labour, education and health. With the renewed interest in child labour as an economic and social problem during the 1990s, researchers have attempted to assess its linkages to the core elements of human capital, hoping to solve continuing riddles in development policy and improve the quality of life for the world’s poorest and most disadvantaged inhabitants. The paper concludes that much work remains to be done to link specific outcomes to particular types of work, at particular intensities, for children of particular ages, gender and socioeconomic circumstances

In the face of disaster : children and climate change

MCDIARMID, Paula
INTERNATIONAL SAVE THE CHILDREN ALLIANCE
Ed
2008

Expand view

This report explores the potential impact of climate change and natural disasters on children’s health, nutrition, protection and education. The report also raises concerns about how vulnerable households will cope and adapt to these changes, and what this might mean for children’s survival. It focuses on improving disaster risk reduction, including the use of child-centred approaches, and improving humanitarian response

Literature review : children's non-schooling activities and their impact on children's health, education and well-being

INTERNATIONAL LABOUR ORGANIZATION (ILO)
INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMME ONTHE ELIMINATION OF CHILD LABOUR (IPEC)
January 2007

Expand view

This literature review focuses on how children’s non-school activities (both economic and non-economic) affect their education, health and well-being. The specific purpose of the review is to: (i) consolidate the various empirical findings on the subject, and (ii) identify gaps in the knowledge on the linkages

A guide to General Comment 7 : implementing child rights in early childhood

UNITED NATIONS COMMITTEE ON THE RIGHTS OF THE CHILD
UNITED NATIONS CHILDREN'S FUND
BERNARD VAN LEER FOUNDATION
Eds
2006

Expand view

The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child applies to all children under 18 - but its implementation poses particular practical challenges when it comes to young children. This book is a guide to implementing child rights in early childhood. It is based around the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child's General Comment no 7. It contains extracts from the papers submitted to the committee at the time of the Day of General Discussion which preceded the General Comment, and other relevant material

Strong foundations : early childhood care and education. Education for all monitoring report 2007

United Nations Educational, Scientific And Cultural Organization (UNESCO)
2006

Expand view

"This global monitoring report focuses on the first Education for All goal, which calls upon countries to expand and improve early childhood care and education - a holistic package encompassing care, health and nutrition in addition to education. Disadvantaged children stand to benefit the most, yet too few developing countries, and too few donor agencies, have made early childhood a priority." Additional features on the CD-ROM: 1. The report in ten questions 2. Highlights and overview of the 2007 report 3. 2007 summary report 4. Background research papers commissioned for the report 5. Over 90 country profiles on early childhood care and education

Children's transition to school : learning and health outcomes. Research study summary report

TURNER-COBB, Julie
et al
2006

Expand view

"The aim of the study was to look at how children responded to the experience of starting school and how they had adapted after six months of the start of their first term. In total, one hundred and five children (53 boys and 52 girls) and one of their parents signed up for the study. In addition, 76 teachers agreed to take part and provide information relating to adjustment to school. The first issue that we explored was that of physical stress responses of children before, during and after starting school, which we measured by collecting saliva samples in the morning and evening at specific time points throughout the study. Secondly, we set out to look at the relationship between these responses and children’s behaviour, on their ability to learning and on their physical health (common cold and flu)"

The interaction of public assets, private assets and community characteristics and its effect on early childhood height-for-age in Peru

ESCOBAL, Javier
et al
2005

Expand view

"Child health in general and long-term nutritional status in particular are related to family characteristics and assets (including maternal education) and community characteristics (including access to public services), as well as to child-specific characteristics...This paper particularly explores how mothers' education interacts with access to clean water and sewerage, availability and quality of health facilities, proximity to paved or engineered roads, and access to electricity"

Orphans and the impact of HIV/AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa

DE WAGT, A
CONNOLLY, M
2005

Expand view

In Africa 11 million children have become orphans as a result of AIDS, and the data for sub-Saharan Africa is expected to worsen dramatically over the next few years. This article assesses the implications of increased child vulnerability in terms of care needs, education, survival, and, crucially, nutrition and food security. It suggests that these are vital aspects of children's development and even more importantly they are interconnected: children's nutrition status, for example, affects their cognitive and emotional development and this in turn impacts on their health status. The article calls for a combined development-humanitarian response, capable of responding to the immediate basic needs of orphans but also designed to help recover long-lasting capability and community and family coping mechanisms

One in two : children are the key to Africa's future

SAVE THE CHILDREN
2005

Expand view

In many African countries, children make up half of the population, and the cycle of poverty can only end with the full recognition of childrens' rights. The statistics on the state of child welfare, health, and education are shocking: 12.5 million have lost both parents to AIDS, and around 2.2 million are HIV-positive. Half of all children fail to complete primary education. This document urges governments, donors and multilateral agencies to work towards: free HIV/AIDS health services, free education, economic justice for Africa's children, food security for children, the end of children's involvement in war and transparency to tackle corruption

Ensuring the rights of indigenous children

MILLER, Michael
February 2004

Expand view

This Digest details how the rights of indigenous children in both rural and urban areas are often compromised or denied. Specific areas of concern include the rights of indigenous children to survival and development, to good health, to education that respects their cultural identity, to protection from abuse, violence and exploitation, and participation in decision-making processes relevant to their lives. At the same time, however, indigenous children possess special resources as custodians of a multitude of cultures, languages, beliefs and knowledge systems. As this Digest discusses, the most effective initiatives to promote the rights of indigenous children build upon these very elements. Such initiatives recognize the inherent strength of indigenous communities, families and children, respect their dignity and give them full voice in all matters that affect them. The child age group in this report is from 0 - 18, with some areas that focus on early childhood development. For example, the right to birth registration, a name and nationality (p 9), or intercultural initiatives for safe childbirth in Peru (p 15)

We the children : meeting the promises of the World Summit for Children

UNITED NATIONS CHILDREN'S FUND (UNICEF)
September 2001

Expand view

The report assesses progress to date in meeting the commitments made to the children around the world at the 1990 World Summit for Children. It also includes best practices and lessons learned, obstacles to progress, and a plan of action for building a world fit for children. It will be particularly useful to policy-makers, researchers, journalists and students as a reference tool and as an example of the progress that can be achieved through goal-oriented development planning

Childrearing in Hubai Village, China

YAJUN, Z
YI, L
CHAMPAGNE, S
December 1999

Expand view

This paper summarises the findings of research carried out by staff of the China National Institute for Educational Research, which runs the Foundation-supported Hebei preschool education project. The research looked into the childrearing practices of a small village in the province of Hebei in northern China. The project will use the research findings to tailor its future work to local conditions

Review of early childhood development policy and programs in Sub-Saharan Africa

COLLETTA, Nat J
REINHOLD, Amy Jo
1997

Expand view

The report complements the paper "The Condition of Young Children in Sub-Saharan Africa" (report no. WTP326). This report reviews current programs and policies across a set of country experiences, and focuses on efforts which address intersecting health, nutrition, and early education needs of children aged zero to six in their institutional and socio-cultural environments. Eleven approaches to early childhood development were selected for study. The report analyzes in each case the contextual impetus from which program and policy choices were made. The analysis begins with program and policy features which directly affect children and their families, then works outward to levels of community, regional, national and international support. Concluding chapters highlight gaps in experience to date and summarize challenges which lie ahead for creating integrated supports to health, nutrition, and early education in a manner that is consistent with the strengths of tradition and culture in Sub-Saharan Africa.

Malnutrition and infection in the classroom : summary and conclusions

POLLITT, E
September 1990

Expand view

As the final chapter in a monograph by the same title, this article presents an overview of the evidence discussed in the book. It demonstrates that poor nutrition and health pose a significant educational problem and suggests means to address this problem. Nutrition and health conditions are reviewed in terms of the developmental period in which a child is exposed and the effect on school learning. A summary table of salient findings lists a number of nutrition and health conditions that are educational-risk factors contributing to educational inefficiency.

World declaration on the survival, protection and development of children and plan of action for implementing the world declaration

UNITED NATIONS (UN)
1990

Expand view

This document was adopted during the world summit for children in September 1990. Led by 71 heads of state and government and 88 other senior officials, mostly at the ministerial level, the world summit adopted a declaration on the survival, protection and development of children and a plan of action for implementing the declaration in the 1990s. These documents contain outlined specific promises to promote the "optimal growth and development in childhood through measures to eradicate hunger, malnutrition and famine" and the plans to achieve this goal

Pages

E-bulletin

Source e-bulletin on Disability and Inclusion

Subscribe to updates