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Gender & eye health : equal access to care

VISION 2020
2009

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The long-term goal is to achieve global gender equity in the use of eye care services and service outcomes. There is good evidence that in most developing countries, women are less likely to receive eye care services than men, particularly services that will prevent or treat blinding conditions. Added to the fact that women comprise more than half of the elderly population, and that the natural incidence of some blinding diseases (cataract and trachoma) is higher among women than men, this results in a situation where women account for 60-65 per cent of blind people worldwide. While there have been some successful programmes to improve gender equity in eye care, a more systematic approach needs to be adopted

The state of Africa's children 2008 : child survival

ROGERS, Kate
GEBRE-EGZIABHER, Hirut
2008

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This report complements UNICEF’s ‘State of the World’s Children 2008’. It considers progress towards the related Millennium Development Goals in the region and the main causes of child deaths. It considers health-care systems and community-based approaches to providing maternal and child health care and outlines priorities required to accelerate progress

Bulletin of the World Health Organization|the international journal of public health

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Focuses on a particular issue each month and contains reviews of latest scientific and biomedical research. Places research findings and policy-relevant discussion side by side to highlight good practice in approaching health problems.The full-text of articles are available in full-text, free-of-charge on the WHO website. A monthly table of contents is also available by email alert
12 issues per year
Free online
Print : 181.00 CHF - (developing countries), 331.00 CHF - (elsewhere)

Child health dialogue|(incorporating Dialogue on diarrhoea & ARI news)

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Child Health Dialogue offers clear, practical advice on preventing and treating the main childhood illnesses. In addition to information on clinical management, the newsletter addresses issues which affect health workers' and families' abilities to care for children, such as communication skills, organisation of health centres and hospitals, health education and training. Regular features include: guidelines for diagnosis and treatment; training tips; information on rational drug use; research updates; feedback from the field. Aimed at health and community workers at district level and below, a secondary audience includes health managers, policy makers and academics.
Regional language editions are produced in collaboration with partner organisations in developing countries as follows:
(English for India) CMAI, Plot 2, A-3 Local Shopping Centre, Janakpuri, New Delhi 110 058, India. E-mail: cmaidel@gems.vsnl.net.in Website: http://www.cmai.org/htmdoc/calend.htm
(Tamil) RUHSA, CMC, PO 632 209 North Arcot Ambedkar District, Tamil Nadu, India
(Gujarati and Hindi) CHETNA, Lilavatiben Lalbhai's Bungalow, Civil Camp Road, Shahibaug, Ahmedabad 380 004, India. E-mail: chetna@adinet.ernet.in
(Bangla) CINI, PO Box 16742, Calcutta 700 027, India
(Chinese) Institute of Medical Information, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, 3 Yabao Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100020, China
(Spanish) AIS Bolivia, PO Box 568, La Paz, Bolivia. E-mail: aisbolol@ceibo.entelnet.bo
(Portuguese) Consultants at the Faculty of Medicine, Eduardo Mondlane University, CP 257, Maputo, Mozambique. E-mail: medico@zebra.uem.mz
Four times a year

E-bulletin

Source e-bulletin on Disability and Inclusion

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