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Inclusive disaster risk management : governments, communities and groups acting together

UNITED NATIONS (UN)
March 2015

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This Issue Brief, presented in advance of the United Nations (UN) Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction, outlines the UN position on the importance of developing more inclusive Disaster Risk Management (DRM) strategies. After initially outlining the importance of inclusivity, the paper goes on the present a number of key ways forward, including greater capacity development, greater understanding of risk, and the creation of innovative partnerships and institutional relationships

UN World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction

14-18 March 2015

Sendai, Japan

Mental health recommendations included in Sendai framework for disaster risk reduction

UNITED NATIONS UNIVERSITY
March 2015

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“The expert group was formed to address this challenge, bringing together UN experts to review evidence on mental well-being and disability related to disasters, share lessons learned and best practices, and develop recommendations for mainstreaming these issues in Disaster Risk Education.” This UN University report illustrates how disability and mental health should be highlighted as a priority in disaster risk reduction planning and execution. In addition, the group responsible for the report suggest that disability and mental health be integrated into any future discussions related to security and human rights. Finally, the group recommended that a United Nations working group be established to explore the ways in which policies and action effect or how these individuals can affect policy within the United Nations. 

Children with disabilities and disaster risk reduction : a review

RONOH, Steve
GAILLARD, JC
MARLOWE, Jay
March 2015

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“This article highlights the existing research and knowledge gap between existing knowledge and continuing research being done on similar topics. The review includes literature from two areas of scholarship in relation to disasters—children, and people with disabilities—and provides a critique of the prevailing medical, economic, and social discourses that conceptualize disability and associated implications for DRR. The article analyses the different models in which disability has been conceptualized, and the role this has played in the inclusion or exclusion of children with disabilities in DRR activities and in determining access to necessary resources in the face of disaster. Finally, the study explores possible pathways to studying the contribution and involvement of children with disabilities in DRR”

International Journal of Disaster Risk Science, Volume 6 Issue 1

The checklist on law and disaster risk reduction : pilot version

UNITED NATIONS DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME (UNDP)
INTERNATIONAL FEDERATION OF RED CROSS AND RED SCRESCENT SOCIETIES
March 2015

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This “checklist provides a prioritized and succinct list of ten key questions that lawmakers, implementing officials, and those supporting them need to consider in order to ensure that their laws provide the best support for Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR). It covers not only dedicated Disaster Risk Management (DRM) laws but also other sectoral laws and regulations that are critical for building safety and resilience, as well as the environment, land and natural resource management” 

Finance for reducing disaster risk : 10 things to know

WATSON, Cherlene
et al
March 2015

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This report focuses on the basics of Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) finance and the opportunities that the Post-2015 development finance landscape can offer. The resource analyses DRR spending trends and identifies a number of potential funding sources, both public and private. It concludes with a number of recommendations for future financing, particularly surrounding future international agreements on DRR

Sendai framework for disaster risk reduction 2015 - 2030

UNITED NATIONS OFFICE FOR DISASTER RISK REDUCTION (UNISDR)
2015

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The Sendai Framework is the UN framework/action plan governing Disaster Risk Reduction for the period 2015-2030. It "is built on elements which ensure continuity with the work done by States and other stakeholders under the (Hyogo Framework for Action 2005-2015) HFA and introduces a number of innovations as called for during the consultations and negotiations…The Sendai Framework also articulates the following: the need for improved understanding of disaster risk in all its dimensions of exposure, vulnerability and hazard characteristics; the strengthening of disaster risk governance, including national platforms; accountability for disaster risk management; preparedness to “Build Back Better”; recognition of stakeholders and their roles; mobilization of risk-sensitive investment to avoid the creation of new risk; resilience of health infrastructure, cultural heritage and work-places; strengthening of international cooperation and global partnership, and risk-informed donor policies and programs, including financial support and loans from international financial institutions. There is also clear recognition of the Global Platform for Disaster Risk Reduction and the regional platforms for disaster risk reduction as mechanisms for coherence across agendas, monitoring and periodic reviews in support of UN Governance bodies”

The Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030, Third UN World Conference
Sendai, Japan
18 March 2015

Minimum standards for age and disability inclusion in humanitarian action : pilot version

AGE AND DISABILITY CONSORTIUM
2015

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This pilot version of the Minimum Standards for Age and Disability Inclusion in Humanitarian Action has “been developed for use by all practitioners involved in humanitarian response, including staff and volunteers of local, national, and international humanitarian agencies, with the expectation that the inclusion of people with disabilities and older people is feasible at every stage of the response and in every sector and context. The Standards are intended to inform the design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of humanitarian programmes; to strengthen accountability to people with disabilities and older people; and to support advocacy, capacity-building and preparedness measures on age and disability across the humanitarian system

 

The Standards are drawn from a wide-ranging review of existing guidance and standards developed by humanitarian actors over recent years. This includes material from organisations with a special focus on disability and/or older age, together with key documents, including the Sphere Handbook, the Sphere Companion Standards and the Core Humanitarian Standard on Quality and Accountability (CHS). The Minimum Standards for Age and Disability Inclusion do not create entirely new demands on humanitarian actors; rather, they clarify and reinforce what is already required if broader standards of impartial humanitarian programming and the principles of the Humanitarian Charter are to be upheld”

The EU stresses the need for inclusive disaster risk management

EUROPEAN COMMISSION (EC)
January 2015

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The article presents information about the Latvian Presidency of the Council of the European Union highlighting the need for stronger measures to guarantee the inclusion of people with disabilities in disaster risk management activities across the 28 EU member states

Workshop on the needs of persons with disabilities throughout disaster management cycle

LATVIAN PRESIDENCY OF THE COUNCIL OF THE EUROPEAN UNION
January 2015

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This webpage contains the contents of the workshop on needs of persons with disabilities throughout disaster management cycle organised by the Latvian Presidency of the Council of the European Union. The main page contains an overview of the workshops and provides links to a number of detailed presentations and related workshop information 

"Workshop on needs of persons with disabilities throughout disaster management cycle"
12-13 Jan 2015
Riga, Latvia

Inclusion : the key to essential disaster risk management

HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL (HI)
2015

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This briefing paper outlines the importance of including people with disabilities and other vulnerable groups in disaster risk management. The paper gives on overview of the basic principles of inclusive Disaster Risk Management (DRM) before providing recommendations for practitioners, states and donors

 

Disability and the global South (DGS) 2015, Vol. 2 No. 3

DISABILITY AND THE GLOBAL SOUTH
2015

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This journal presents six articles in this collection about disability in several countries. Articles include research on typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines, analysis of policy that aims to reduce the mental health treatment gap in Africa, research on inclusive education in Kenya and others

Disability & the global South (DGS), Vol. 2 No. 3

Disability inclusive disaster risk reduction

DISABILITY INCLUSIVE DISASTER RISK REDUCTION NETWORK (DIDRRN)
2015

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This newsletter presents articles about disability inclusive disaster risk reduction research, workshops, projects, news, reflections and awareness-raising activities 

DIDRR News, Issue 3

Guidelines for integrating gender-based violence interventions in humanitarian action: Reducing risk, promoting resilience and aiding recovery

WARD, Jean
LAFRENIERE, Julie
et al
2015

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The purpose of these Guidelines is to assist humanitarian actors and communities affected by armed conflict, natural disasters and other humanitarian emergencies to coordinate, plan, implement, monitor and evaluate essential actions for the prevention and mitigation of gender-based violence (GBV) across all sectors of humanitarian response. Part One presents an overview of GBV, provides an explanation for why GBV is a protection concern for all humanitarian actors and outlines recommendations for ensuring implementation of the Guidelines. Part Two provides a background to the ‘thematic areas’ in Part Three. It also introduces the guiding principles and approaches that are the foundation for all planning and implementation of GBV-related programming. Part Three constitutes the bulk of these Guidelines. It provides specific guidance, organized into thirteen thematic area sections: camp coordination and camp management; child protection; education; food security and agriculture; health; housing, land and property; humanitarian mine action; livelihoods; nutrition; protection; shelter, settlement and recovery; water, sanitation and hygiene; humanitarian operations support sectors. The importance of cross-sectoral coordination is highlighted in each section. It is also recommended that sector actors review the content of all thematic area sections. The Guidelines draw from many tools, standards, background materials and other resources developed by the United Nations, national and international non-governmental organizations, and academic sources. In each thematic area there is a list of resources specific to that area, and additional GBV-related resources are provided in Annex 1. The importance of indicators being disaggregated by sex, age, disability and other vulnerability factors is highlighted throughout.

Integrating individuals with access and functional needs in exercises toolkit for North Carolina emergency managers

KAILES, June Isaacson
2015

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This guidance is for a broad audience including emergency professionals across settings and sectors, government, education, business, and nonprofit.
The guidance are aimed at people who may need additional, targeted response assistance to;
1. maintain their health, safety and independence in an emergency
2. receive, understand and act on emergency messages
3. evacuate during an emergency.

Annie Patri : how to include and empower the vulnerable in disaster risk reduction

OVERSEAS DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE (ODI)
December 2014

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Annie Patri, speaking in her capacity as Project Coordinator and Acting Domain Coordinator for Disaster Risk Management (DRM) at Handicap international at an ODI event, discusses the challenges faced by people with disabilities in the event of a disaster. Annie argues that not only is there too little data on the challenges facing people with disabilities in the event of a disaster, but there are also considerable access issues for people with disabilities. In this talk Annie outlines how people with disabilities can and must be embraced as active agents of change in the event of a disaster

 

ODI event “How to include and empower the vulnerable in disaster risk reduction”

London, UK

25 November 2015

How to include and empower the vulnerable in disaster risk reduction

OVERSEAS DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE (ODI)
November 2014

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 “This event is one of a new event series Rethinking International Policy for Reducing Disaster Risk hosted by the Overseas Development Institute (ODI) and Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN). The series examines some of the more thorny issues involved in renegotiating the Hyogo Framework for Action, including public private partnerships, use of risk assessments, fragile states and conflict and effective governance for DRR, amongst others”

ODI seminar “How to include and empower the vulnerable in disaster risk reduction”

London, UK

25 November 2014

“We can also change” Piloting participatory research with persons with disabilities and older people in Bangladesh

BURNS, Danny
OSWALD, Katy
November 2014

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Sightsavers, HelpAge International, ADD International and Alzheimer’s Disease International worked together with the Institute of Development Studies (IDS) to bring the perspectives of those who live in poverty or who are highly marginalised into post-2015 policy making. The aim of the research was to understand better the experiences of social, political and economic exclusion of persons with disabilities and older people in Bangladesh from their own perspectives. Two groups (community and NGO) of peer researchers collected 70 stories from poor and/or excluded persons with disabilities and older people from each of the two sites: Bhashantek, an urban slum in Dhaka; and Cox’s Bazar, a rural area in southeast Bangladesh. From the stories collected and analysed in workshops, the peer researchers identified 13 priority areas that affect persons with disabilities and older people: accidents and disasters; livelihoods; access to education; medical treatment; family support; exclusion and mistreatment; superstition; access to services; mobility; marriage; land; rape and sexual abuse; the role of grassroots community-based organisations. Recommendations from the researchers are made in each area. The peer research programme was evaluated and guidelines for its use are provided.

Availability and diversity of training programs for responders to international disasters and complex humanitarian emergencies

JACQUET, Gabrielle A
et al
June 2014

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"Volunteers and members of relief organizations increasingly seek formal training prior to international field deployment. This paper identifies training programs for personnel responding to international disasters and complex humanitarian emergencies, and provides concise information – if available- regarding the founding organization, year established, location, cost, duration of training, participants targeted, and the content of each program. An environmental scan was conducted through a combination of a peer-reviewed literature search and an open Internet search for the training programs.The authors concluded that "a variety of training programs are available for responders to disasters and complex humanitarian emergencies. These programs vary in their objectives, audiences, modules, geographical locations, eligibility and financial cost. This paper presents an overview of available programs and serves as a resource for potential responders interested in capacity-building training prior to deployment"

PLOS Currents Disasters, Edition 1

Inclusive disaster risk management : briefing paper

SHARMA, Anshu
et al
2014

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This briefing paper  presents the case for building safer, more resilient communities in South Asia using evidence-based inclusive approaches to Disaster Risk Management (DRM) through multi-stakeholder engagement. It is based on the learning from the Inclusive Community Resilience for Sustainable Disaster Risk Management (INCRISD) South Asia project, currently being implemented in Afghanistan, Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka. It concludes by highlighting ten recommendations more inclusive Disaster Risk Management framework, and, while the paper is based on South Asia experiences, the recommendations and approaches can have global application

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