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Rehabilitation in sudden onset disasters.

September 2015

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The role of rehabilitation professionals in responding to Sudden Onset Disasters (SODs) is evolving rapidly, and our professions increasingly find themselves at the forefront of emergency response teams. At the same time, there is a movement towards the professionalisation of the humanitarian response sector, in particular Emergency Medical Teams, and a recognition that specialist training is required to prepare professionals for work in an austere humanitarian environment. The intended audience of the manual are physiotherapists and occupational therapists who may deploy to provide rehabilitation in the immediate aftermath of a sudden onset disaster. It was developed to support volunteers on the UK International Emergency Trauma Register (UKIETR), but with the aim of being relevant to all rehabilitation professionals interested in rapid deployment to austere environments. The content is restricted to the context of sudden onset disasters such as an earthquake or tsunami, and has been developed to support work in an austere environment, where the type of equipment and support that is normally available has been disrupted. UKIETR professionals are UK based volunteers who receive specialist training to prepare them for international deployment as part of team in response to emergencies. They may be deployed within a multi-disciplinary foreign medical team in a field hospital scenario, or as part of a more specialist ‘cell’ offering niche medical, surgical or rehabilitation services. The manual is designed to complement the three day core rehabilitation training run by Handicap International which all UKIETR members must attend. It is a clinical manual, and the contents are directly linked to modules taught on the core training course. In addition there are a number of ‘cheat sheets’ and patient education resources at the back of the manual which are designed to be used in the field. Chapters include: rehabilitation and the UKIETR; introduction to rehabilitation following sudden onset disasters; amputee rehabilitation; spinal cord injury; peripheral nerve injury; fractures; burns and soft tissue injury; and acquired brain injury

Contingency planning guide

INTERNATIONAL FEDERATION OF RED CROSS AND RED CRESCENT SOCIETIES
2012

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This document provides an overview of the key elements of contingency planning. This guide is aimed at assisting National Society and IFRC staff responsible for developing contingency plans at the local, national, regional or global levels. It is essential to develop contingency plans in consultation and cooperation with those who will have to implement or approve them. This document provides guidelines, not strict rules; planning priorities will differ according to the context and scope of any given situation. This guide breaks contingency planning down into five main steps: prepare, analyse, develop, implement and review. Each step is covered by a separate chapter in this document

Capacity, change and performance : study report

BASER, Heather
MORGAN, Peter
April 2008

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This comprehensive report looks in detail at the issues of capacity and capacity development including an explanation and discussion of the concept of capacity development. The report considers the main actors who play a part in, and different ways to think about, capacity development; the different conditions under which capacity development takes place; and the processes and strategies that can/should be employed to increase it.  The report is structured to enable readers to easily access the sections that are relevant to them

Discussion Paper No 59B

The challenge of capacity development, working towards good practice

ORGANISATION FOR ECONOMIC CO-OPERATION AND DEVELOPMENT (OECD)
January 2006

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This OECD report “draws on four decades of documented experience provided by both bilateral and multilateral donors, as well as academic specialists, to help policy makers and practitioners think through effective approaches to capacity development and what challenges remain in the drive to boost country capacity. The analysis is underpinned by a conceptual framework which guides practitioners to view capacity development at three interrelated levels: individual, organisational and the enabling environment. It provides insights into what capacity development is, why it matters and, more importantly, what can be done to support it”

 

Note: Powerpoint slides are also available at: http://www.oecd.org/env/outreach/40695940.pdf 

Planning for disaster

SMITH, L Murphy
June 1994

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"The string of natural and man-made disasters that had recently devastated US businesses underscores the importance of disaster recovery planning (DRP). In addition to a general emergency plan, companies must also have computer contingency plans to protect critical information from loss, destruction, theft and other risks. An effective DRP should provide for the recovery of vital records, alternative telecommunication systems, evacuation of disabled employees, housing arrangements for the recovery team, food service and alternate sources of supplies. A computer contingency plan, on the other hand, should have emergency, back-up, recovery, test and maintenance plans. Adequate computer contingency planning should help firms to quickly regain their capabilities to process information and get back in business"

The CPA Journal Online

Business continuity & disaster preparedness plan

MUNICIPALITY OF ANCHORAGE OFFICE OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT

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"How quickly your company gets back to business after an earthquake, fire or flood often depends on the emergency planning you do today. Though each situation is unique, any organization can be better prepared if it plans carefully, puts emergency procedures in place, and practices for all kinds of emergencies. This planning document outlines common sense measures you can take to start getting ready and provides practical information to help you plan for your company’s future. A commitment to planning will help support your employees, your clients, the community, and the local economy. It also protects your business investment and gives your company a better chance for survival"

Planning for business continuity after a disaster

INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE (IRS) UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY

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In this video the IRS provide advice on steps that organisations can take to plan for disasters in a way that protects the business and maximises the possibility of a fast recovery

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