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Saving lives and leaving no one behind - The Gaibandha Model for disability-inclusive disaster risk reduction

ROTHE, Manuel
BROWN, David
NEUSCHAFER, Oliver
October 2018

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"The Gaibandha Model" good practices guide outlines a framework for successful disability-inclusive disaster risk reduction programming. It is based on the experience of CBM and its partners in implementing community-based disaster risk reduction programs in some of the most flood-affected communities in Bangladesh. The model puts people with disabilities at the center of disaster risk reduction. They are the agents for change, working with the community to improve local systems of disaster prevention, preparedness and response to become more accessible and inclusive.

Contingency planning guide

INTERNATIONAL FEDERATION OF RED CROSS AND RED CRESCENT SOCIETIES
2012

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This document provides an overview of the key elements of contingency planning. This guide is aimed at assisting National Society and IFRC staff responsible for developing contingency plans at the local, national, regional or global levels. It is essential to develop contingency plans in consultation and cooperation with those who will have to implement or approve them. This document provides guidelines, not strict rules; planning priorities will differ according to the context and scope of any given situation. This guide breaks contingency planning down into five main steps: prepare, analyse, develop, implement and review. Each step is covered by a separate chapter in this document

Capacity, change and performance : study report

BASER, Heather
MORGAN, Peter
April 2008

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This comprehensive report looks in detail at the issues of capacity and capacity development including an explanation and discussion of the concept of capacity development. The report considers the main actors who play a part in, and different ways to think about, capacity development; the different conditions under which capacity development takes place; and the processes and strategies that can/should be employed to increase it.  The report is structured to enable readers to easily access the sections that are relevant to them

Discussion Paper No 59B

The challenge of capacity development, working towards good practice

ORGANISATION FOR ECONOMIC CO-OPERATION AND DEVELOPMENT (OECD)
January 2006

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This OECD report “draws on four decades of documented experience provided by both bilateral and multilateral donors, as well as academic specialists, to help policy makers and practitioners think through effective approaches to capacity development and what challenges remain in the drive to boost country capacity. The analysis is underpinned by a conceptual framework which guides practitioners to view capacity development at three interrelated levels: individual, organisational and the enabling environment. It provides insights into what capacity development is, why it matters and, more importantly, what can be done to support it”

 

Note: Powerpoint slides are also available at: http://www.oecd.org/env/outreach/40695940.pdf 

Performance and participation [whole issue]

June 1997

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The contributors to the theme section of this issue of PLA Notes – the use of performative media in participatory development – examine how the creative potential of the arts can be used as part of a participatory process and how PRA practitioners might benefit from integrating performative and artistic media into the PRA process. Articles explore the use of participatory theatre to articulate and express the issues that affect people; the use of the language of theatre in participatory monitoring and evaluation; using ‘legislative theatre’ for policy research; using theatre in a participatory educational process; the use of visual and verbal art and video; intersections between theatre and PRA; and using drama in PRA training

Planning for disaster

SMITH, L Murphy
June 1994

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"The string of natural and man-made disasters that had recently devastated US businesses underscores the importance of disaster recovery planning (DRP). In addition to a general emergency plan, companies must also have computer contingency plans to protect critical information from loss, destruction, theft and other risks. An effective DRP should provide for the recovery of vital records, alternative telecommunication systems, evacuation of disabled employees, housing arrangements for the recovery team, food service and alternate sources of supplies. A computer contingency plan, on the other hand, should have emergency, back-up, recovery, test and maintenance plans. Adequate computer contingency planning should help firms to quickly regain their capabilities to process information and get back in business"

The CPA Journal Online

Business continuity & disaster preparedness plan

MUNICIPALITY OF ANCHORAGE OFFICE OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT

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"How quickly your company gets back to business after an earthquake, fire or flood often depends on the emergency planning you do today. Though each situation is unique, any organization can be better prepared if it plans carefully, puts emergency procedures in place, and practices for all kinds of emergencies. This planning document outlines common sense measures you can take to start getting ready and provides practical information to help you plan for your company’s future. A commitment to planning will help support your employees, your clients, the community, and the local economy. It also protects your business investment and gives your company a better chance for survival"

Planning for business continuity after a disaster

INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE (IRS) UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY

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In this video the IRS provide advice on steps that organisations can take to plan for disasters in a way that protects the business and maximises the possibility of a fast recovery

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