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Disability inclusive humanitarian response

ROHWERDER, Brigitte
December 2017

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"Disasters and armed conflicts can also increase the number of persons with disabilities as people acquire new impairments and/or experience a deterioration in existing impairments from injuries and/or limited access to health care and rehabilitation. For instance, a survey of Syrian refugees living in camps in Jordan and Lebanon found that 22 per cent had an impairment. However, accurate numbers can be hard to calculate due to lack of data disaggregation in humanitarian emergencies and differences in the way disability is defined and measured, while families may be reluctant to disclose disability due to fear of stigma and isolation. As a result, humanitarian programmes may inadequately document and consider the needs of persons with disabilities"

This short Operational Practice Paper from the Humanitarian Learning Centre offers lessons for disability inclusion in humanitarian response. 

Inclusive disaster risk reduction

LAFRENIERE, Annie
WALBAUM, Veronique
2017

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This policy paper defines the themes of inclusive disaster risk reduction and explains how these activities fit into the HI mandate. It also identifies the target population and defines modalities of intervention–standard expected outcomes, standard activities–as well as monitoring and evaluation indicators.

Technical report 1 : mapping of organisations in Indonesia in disaster risk reduction [MOIDRR]

CENTRE FOR DISABILITY RESEARCH AND POLICY, University of Sydney
ARBEITER-SAMARITER-BUND INDONESIA
June 2015

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This is the first Technical Report in a three part series for the two year DFAT Australian Aid funded project (2013-2015), Promoting the Inclusion of People with Disabilities in Disaster Management in Indonesia. This report details the mapping of organisations in Indonesia working in disaster risk reduction (DRR). The two year project was concerned with understanding the gaps between disability inclusive policy and practices in DRR and supporting opportunities to include people with disabilities in all phases of disaster risk management. The premise of this work was that reducing the vulnerability of people with disability during disasters is a key strategy to promote broader community resilience

 

The direct and practical solutions that people with disability can offer to community-level DRR activities should be a key consideration within all phases of disaster risk management. Inclusion of people with disabilities in DRR before, during, and after disasters contributes to the “whole-of-community” approach to disaster resilience advocated in contemporary policy and enacted by DRR agencies. This project was initially framed within an increasing awareness of disability inclusion in DRR globally which is now articulated in the recently issued Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030 (UNDISR, 2015), and within an increasingly supportive policy environment in Indonesia

Technical report 3 : the disability inclusive disaster resilience (DiDR) tool : development and field-testing

CENTRE FOR DISABILITY RESEARCH AND POLICY, University of Sydney
ARBEITER-SAMARITER-BUND INDONESIA
June 2015

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This is the third Technical Report in a three part series for the two year DFAT Australian Aid funded project (2013-2015), Promoting the Inclusion of People with Disabilities in Disaster Management in Indonesia. This report details the development, refinement and field–testing of the Disability Inclusive Disaster Resilience (DiDR) tool. The purpose of the DiDR tool is to identify the resilience and capabilities of people with disabilities to natural disasters in their family and community setting. The tool is designed to be used by people with disabilities, their families or carers and thereby to promote the inclusion of people with disabilities in Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) policy making and strategy implementation. The tool assesses the resilience of people with disabilities by bringing together four components known to be fundamental to disaster risk reduction: the individual’s functioning status, their level of participation in their communities, the physical vulnerability of their place of residence, and individual risk predictors known to influence the behaviour of the general population before, during and after a natural hazard emergency. In February and March 2015, the survey teams administered the DiDR Tool by interviewing 289 people with disabilities or their carers in four Indonesian Districts affected by diverse natural hazards 

Empowerment and participation : good practices from South & South-East Asia in disability inclusive disaster risk management

BOLTE, Patrick
MARR, Samadhi
SITOMPU, Dewi
et al
2014

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This report presents good practices showing examples of inclusion and active participation of persons with disabilities in disaster risk management. The paper is structured in three sections that illustrate general recommendations towards greater participation of persons with disabilities.

Section A provides the background on disability inclusive disaster risk management and reviews existing guidelines as to how the participation of people with disabilities in disaster risk management can be facilitated. 

Section B contains the actual good practices, structured in three separate chapters that illustrate general recommendations towards greater participation of persons with disabilities. Each practice highlights the involvement of individual persons as well as groups, describes the initial setting, the achievements, and the lessons learned from the practice. Each practice concludes with a box with key insights.

The final section C presents the key recommendations that can be drawn from the good practices and that are geared to inform future programming

Disaster resilience in an ageing world : how to make policies and programmes inclusive of older people

HELPAGE INTERNATIONAL
2014

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“This publication aims to promote age-inclusive resilience-building among practitioners and policy-makers. It gives a comprehensive overview of how resilience-building programmes should be designed and implemented to ensure the inclusion of older people. It also highlights the benefits of including and empowering older people through DRR and resilience-building activities. By applying an older people lens to DRR programming, which involves assessing the specific vulnerabilities and capacities of older people and encouraging them to take a more proactive role, we can support older people to become more resilient – with wide ranging benefits for themselves, their families, and their wider communities. We have included case studies to highlight good practice, demonstrating what can be achieved by working for and with older people” 

Improving health at home and abroad : how overseas volunteering from the nhs benefits the uk and the world

ALL PARTY PARLIAMENTARY GROUP ON GLOBAL HEALTH
July 2013

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"This report describes how British health volunteers help to make big improvements in health in other countries whilst at the same time benefiting the UK. It argues that even more could be achieved with better organisation and support and that more people can be involved through virtual communication as well as by actually travelling abroad"

Improving health at home and abroad : how overseas volunteering from the NHS benefits the UK and the world|Executive summary

ALL PARTY PARLIAMENTARY GROUP ON GLOBAL HEALTH
July 2013

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This executive summary presents a summary of the main report which describes how British health volunteers help to make big improvements in health in other countries whilst at the same time benefiting the UK. It argues that even more could be achieved with better organisation and support and that more people can be involved through virtual communication as well as by actually travelling abroad

Alternative care in emergencies (ACE) toolkit : summary guidance

FULFORD, Louise Melville
2011

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"This document provides a rapid overview of best practices in relation to interim care, including Key Principles and a Key Summary Guidance of the actions required before and during the emergency response, associated tools and where in the Extended Guidance to go for detailed information. A List of Tools located in the Zip File is included as well
This document also contains the Draft Standard Operating Procedures for Supporting Children’s Community-Based Care Placements (SOP’s). These were developed from the Haiti response by Katherine Williamson for the IRC, and provide an example set of the tasks required by those identifying, assessing and placing separated and unaccompanied children in an emergency, in accordance with the national context and required procedures. These serve as an example and can assist in the development of SOP’s to suit the context and legal and policy framework in which you are working"

Alternative care in emergencies (ACE) toolkit : extended guidance

FULFORD, Louise Melville
2011

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"The tools and guidance in this resource are designed to facilitate the process of planning for and implementing interim care and related services for children separated from or unable to live with their families during an emergency. They are based on learning from recent and current emergencies, drawing on the principles and standards set out in the key documents relating to separated children, and out of home care"

Professional standards for protection work : carried out by humanitarian and human rights actors in armed conflict and other situations of violence

FUNK, Michelle
et al
2009

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"This resource outlines professional standards for protection work for humanitarian and human rights actors in armed conflict and other situations of violence. It was compiled through an extensive consultative process and reflects shared thinking and common agreement among humanitarian and human rights actors on minimum but essential elements, as well as principles and good practice required to ensure that their protection work is as safe and effective as possible"

Disabled children’s rights : a practical guide

SAVE THE CHILDREN
May 2006

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This guide looks at how the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC) relates to disabled children in developing countries.  Illustrated with examples of good practice from around the world, it makes the case for taking action to promote disabled children's rights

Breaking barriers : building access for disabled people [whole issue]

WIRZ, Sheila
MEIKLE, Sheilah
Eds
May 2005

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This issue of id21 insights looks at barriers to disabled peoples' access to the physical environment, how they constrain economic and social opportunities and the importance of working with disabled people to dismantle them. The contributors also present good practices in a range of infrastructures, including transport, communication technologies and sanitation, that serve as examples of how disabled access can improve in developing countries. Articles include: Training Ethiopia's blind people in ICTs; Accessible water supply and sanitation; Creating disabled-friendly environments in Sri Lanka; Better access to public transport; Campaigning for access in Viet Nam; Including disabled people effectively in post-Tsunami planning

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