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Improving educational outcomes for people with disabilities in low and middle-income countries: why does it matter and what works?

KUPER, Hannah
SARAN, Ashrita
WHITE, Howard
July 2018

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The studies included in this Rapid Evidence Assessment (REA) are taken from the Disability Evidence and Gap Map (EGM) prepared by the Campbell Collaboration for the UK Department for International Development (DFID) under the auspices of the Centre for Excellence for Development Impact and Learning (CEDIL). Eligible studies included systematic reviews and impact evaluations published in English from 2000 onwards that assessed the effectiveness of interventions for people with disabilities in LMICs. Qualitative studies, process evaluations, and non-impact evaluations (e.g. crosssectional surveys) were not eligible for inclusion. Quality grading was applied to the literature, so that assessment could be made of where there was strong evidence and where evidence was limited or missing. The studies were grouped by education sub-outcomes related to different stages in education across the life course; that is: early intervention, primary education, secondary education, non-formal education, and lifelong learning. 

 

There were 24 eligible individual studies, including studies conducted in the Middle East (10), Asia (7), and Africa (5), one from Latin America, as well as one multicountry study

Life as a disabled child : a qualitative study of young people’s experiences and perspectives

SHAKESPEARE, Tom
March 2005

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This report documents the results of a project to explore disabled children’s (11 – 16 years old) experiences, and their perceptions of impairment; of services; and of their social relationships with family, peers and professionals. The study involved over 300 children in a range of settings and used qualitative methods.
The research highlighted an atmosphere of resentment towards the comparatively high levels of adult surveillance disabled children faced, as opposed to their non-disabled peers, along with the varying degrees to which the word ‘disabled’ and the concept of disability had been appropriated and understood by disabled children themselves. Finally, it alluded to the presence of multiple barriers to inclusion (as generally understood by the social model) that disabled children were still facing on a regular basis

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