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My right is our future the transformative power of disability-inclusive education. 03 Series on disability-inclusive development

CBM International
November 2018

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This publication explores the challenges of disability-inclusive education systems and provides practical support suggestions that can better meet both the general and specific learning needs of all children, including those with disabilities. It recognises that inclusive education is a complex process and aims to help governmental and non-governmental actors to navigate the most suitable pathways to change.

Topics include: Individual and systemic approaches; non-negotiable commitments; collaboration; long-term process; understanding and awareness; stakeholder empowerment and engagement; Innovation: accessibility and reasonable accommodation; Innovation: teachers and teacher education; Innovation: transition and lifelong learning; and organising inclusive education systems

15 case studies are provided

Young persons with disabilities: Global study on ending gender-based violence, and realising sexual and reproductive health and rights

McCLOSKEY, Megan
MEYERS, Stephen
July 2018

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This study provides an analysis on the situation of young persons with disabilities concerning discrimination and gender-based violence, including the impact on their sexual and reproductive health and rights. It also provides an assessment of legal, policy and programming developments and specific good practices in service delivery as well as best-standard prevention and protection measures. Finally, policy and programming recommendations are provided to assist in greater promotion of the rights of young persons with disabilities, with a particular emphasis on preventing and responding to gender-based violence, and realizing sexual and reproductive health and rights.

Everybody Matters: Good practices for inclusion of people with disabilities in sexual and reproductive health and rights programmes

Van SLOBBE, Caroline
November 2017

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This publication provides introductory chapters from two activists who work to create better opportunities for people with disabilities in Nigeria and India. Subsequently, the challenges that organisations worldwide have encountered whilst improving the access to and knowledge of sexual and reproductive health and rights for people with disabilities are presented. Ways in which they managed to find solutions and the results achieved are reviewed. Some cases show the importance of a more personal approach whilst others emphasise the advantage of changing systems and policies. Different regions, types of disabilities and various SRHR-topics are reflected in these stories. All cases provide lessons learnt that contribute to a set of recommendations for improved responses. The closing chapter highlights the challenges, solutions, and ambitions that are presented and lead up to a concise overview of recommendations.  

Good practice examples include:

A shift in SRH programming (Nepal)

Breaking Barriers with performance art (Kenya)

Her Body, Her Rights (Ethiopia)

People with disabilities leading the way (Israel Family Planning Association)

Best Wishes for safe motherhood (Nepal)

It’s my body! (Bangladesh)

Calling a spade a spade (Netherlands)

Four joining forces (Colombia)

Change agents with a disability (Zimbabwe)

Tito’s privacy and rights (Argentina)

Sign language for service providers (Kenya)

Disability, CBR & Inclusive Development, Vol 28, No 2 (2017), summer 2017

June 2017

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6 research articles

  • Teachers’ Perceptions of Disabilities on the Island of Roatán, Honduras 
  • Access to Services and Barriers faced by People with Disabilities: A Quantitative Survey
  • Parent Empowerment in Early Intervention Programmes of Children with Hearing Loss in Mumbai, India 
  • Analysis of Bibliography on Specific Learning Disability in India 
  • Positive and Negative Impacts on Caregivers of Children with Intellectual Disability in India 
  • Effect of Multidisciplinary Intervention on Clinical Outcomes of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder in Mumbai, India 

 

 doi 10.5463

Fair’n square : a fair and equal world for all children

UNICEF
HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL
2015

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This website presents information about a joint UNICEF-Handicap International programme on child disability in two cities of Mozambique, Maputo and Matola. The focus of the project was to first identify children with disabilities and then ensure that these children could access services. The website features a useful video and practical case studies

Capturing the difference we make : community-based rehabilitation indicators manual

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
2015

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This manual presents indicators that "capture the difference (Community-Based Rehabilitation) CBR makes in the lives of people with disabilities in the communities where it is implemented. This manual presents these (base and supplementary) indicators and provides simple guidance on collecting the data needed to inform them. The indicators have been developed to show the difference between people living with a disability and their families and those without disabilities in relation to the information reported in the indicators. This comparability provides valuable information to CBR managers, donors and government agencies alike, which can be used to guide decision-making, support advocacy and improve accountability. Further, the ability of the indicators to provide a comparison of the populations of persons with disability to persons without disability aligns with the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), which states that persons with disability have equal rights to those without disabilities...this manual serves to standardize the monitoring of differences made by in the lives of people with disabilities and their families, making it possible to compare the difference CBR makes across areas and countries. This manual aligns with the WHO Global Disability Action Plan 2014–2021, and may also be used to monitor other development plans in an easy and efficient way”

Inclusive Tanzania network : access to education and political participation of persons with disabilities

LIGHT FOR THE WORLD
Ed
October 2014

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MTAJU - Inclusive Tanzania was a pilot project aiming to empower persons with disabilities through inclusive education and political participation that ran from November 2005 to December 2010. MTAJU is a network of Tanzanian Disabled People’s Organizations (DPOs) and Pro Disability Organizations (PDOs), who campaign together for an inclusive society where people with disabilities enjoy the same rights as other citizens. The project's main aims were the legal, political and social establishment of the right to education of children with disabilities and the right to political participation of persons with disabilities. This short learning guide is based on the full project report and highlights the key lessons learned by the project team. This guide would be very useful for anyone interested in the access to education for children with disabilities and the participation of disabled people in public and political life in Africa in particular and the global south in general

Learning Guide, 2/2014

Include us! : a study of disability among Plan International's sponsored children

PLAN INTERNATIONAL
MONTEAT-VAN DOCK, Adrienne
December 2013

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This study report reveals that children with disabilities in developing countries are being held back from an education. Based upon Plan’s dataset of 1.4 million sponsored children, the report compares sponsored children with a disability to those without, from 30 countries worldwide
Key findings include: children with disabilities are 10 times more likely not to attend school when they do attend school; their level of schooling is below that of their peers; and children with disabilities are much more likely to have had a serious illness in the last 12 months, including malaria and malnutrition. The findings will help Plan and other researchers and organisations to improve responses to the needs of children with disabilities, particularly their health and education

Disability orientation

UNITED NATIONS CHILDREN'S FUND (UNICEF)
May 2013

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"This web-based disability orientation for staff is a multi-media, 40-minute video that includes interesting and thought provoking statements, resources and good practices from UNICEF and partners from across the globe. The objective of the orientation is to strengthen understanding of, and capacity to support, programming for children and women with disabilities. The Disability Orientation consists of two main modules, each module has five lessons. The first part of the Orientation provides an overview of the disability movement and what disability means according to the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. The second part of the Orientation focusses on how to mainstream disability through our work. The Orientation on Disability can be taken individually or in groups"
Note: Video is available with English subtitles as well as accessibility options like voice over and American Sign Language

Who’s on my side?

ALLIANCE FOR INCLUSIVE EDUCATION UK
Parents For Inclusion UK
March 2013

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“"This film features disabled children and young people, their siblings and family members talking about why allies are important. They also talk about the support they get, the support they want and what changes need to be made in education, health and social care services so that they can have real choice and control. It is useful for anyone interested in inclusive education"

The key informant child disability project in Bangladesh and Pakistan

MACTAGGART, Islay
MURTHY, GVS
2013

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The Key Informant Method (KIM) has previously been tested by CBM, LSHTM and others, and found to be a valid method for the identification of children with severe visual impairment and blindness in Bangladesh, using community volunteers in the place of a door-to-door survey. This report outlines a study that set out to expand this and test whether voluntary, community-level Key Informants (KIs) could be trained to effectively identify children with moderate or severe physical impairments, sensory impairments (visual and hearing) or epilepsy in Bangadesh and Pakistan, and if so whether this process could be used to assess prevalence and plan appropriate referral services for children meeting these criteria

Getting to know cerebral palsy|Working with parent groups : a training resource for facilitators, parents, caregivers, and persons with cerebral palsy

INTERNATIONAL CENTRE FOR EVIDENCE IN DISABILITY (ICED)
et al
2013

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This manual aims to increase knowledge and skills in caring for a child with cerebral palsy. Research highlighted the significant needs of the caregivers, and how they can gain a huge amount of support from meeting with each other in an understanding environment. The manual is divided into 11 modules and promotes a participatory learning approach with an emphasis on the empowerment of parents and caregivers. It provides an opportunity for parents to organise themselves and to consider strategies at the community level to address some of the issues which affect them and their child
Note: An online community that aims to support practitioners share their learning and experiences around the parent training manual is available from the weblink. Members can share questions and perspectives, news items and resources with eachother via email or through a community website

Human rights for women and children with disabilities

HUMAN RIGHTS WATCH
2012

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This report highlights various human rights abuses against women and children on the following topics: sexual and gender-based violence targeted at women and girls with disabilities; discrimination in health and reproductive rights, including forced sterilization and HIV and disability; barriers to education for children with disabilities; violence against children with disabilities in schools; and abuses in institutions. This resource is useful to anyone interested in human rights of women and children with disabilities

Disability inclusion in drought and food crisis emergency response

CHRISTOFFEL BLINDENMISSION (CBM) AUSTRALIA
et al
July 2011

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"This factsheet provides base level information to practitioners for awareness raising, training, advocacy, project design and proposal writing. The information may be used and sent out widely, with reference to the Kenya Red Cross, The Association of the Physically Disabled of Kenya, CBM and Handicap International. The overall information in this factsheet is also applicable to older persons and other vulnerable groups"

Abandoned and disappeared : Mexico’s segregation and abuse of children and adults with disabilities

ROSENTHAL, Eric
JEHN, Erin
GALVÀN, Sofia
2010

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This report presents an investigation of psychiatric institutions, orphanages, shelters, and other public facilities that house children and adults with disabilities in Mexico. It documents violations of the rights of people with disabilities under the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) and other human rights treaties ratified by Mexico

Disabled children : a legal handbook

BROACH, Steve
CLEMENTS, Luke
READ, Janet
2010

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This handbook aims to empower disabled children and their families through a greater understanding of their rights and entitlements in England and Wales. It is useful reading for the families of disabled children, their advocates and lawyers, voluntary and statutory sector advisers, commissioners, managers and lawyers working for public authorities, education, social and health care professionals, students and academics

Community based rehabilitation and disability self help groups

LINDOEWOOD, Paul
2009

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This paper calls for strategic planning that involves disability self-help groups (groups that include disabled people and the parents of disabled children) and the role they can play in advocating for the rights of disabled persons in helping to develop a mainstream community that can respond constructively to the needs of its disabled members, as well as services providing community-based rehabilitation. It gives as an example of such an approach the work of the Methodist Church in Kenya Meru North Disability Community Centre, where four community disability initiatives have come together and provide a model of disability development

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