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Children and adults with disabilities

Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (SIDA)
Ed
December 2005

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This position paper concerns the processes for mainstreaming disability in development cooperation. Specifically, it is concerned with the ways in which SIDA can ensure that disabled people are active participants in development work and decision-making processes. The paper includes strategic areas for including persons with disabilities in SIDA's policies and programmes (on education, HIV and AIDS, poverty reduction, etc) along with a range of useful resources on global disability rights and websites on disability issues. This paper would be useful to anyone with an interest in mainstreaming disability in development cooperation, and in particular, to policy-makers, NGOs, and disabled people's organisations

Bridging research and policy : an annotated bibliography

HOVLAND, Ingie
DE VIBE, Maja
YOUNG, John
2002

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An extensive annotated bibliography of 100 documents relevant to 'bridging research and policy'. Mainstream literature is supplemented with alternative viewpoints. The bibliography has been divided into three key themes ('bridging research and policy: the political context', 'the actors: networks, organisations, individuals', 'the message and the media'), including 'new' subject areas that may be useful (eg social psychology, media studies, marketing and communication). The entries are listed alphabetically by author, and then cross-indexed by theme, and by academic discipline

The policy process : an overview

SUTTON, Rebecca
August 1999

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The paper offers an introduction to analysis of the policy process. It identifies and describes theoretical approaches in political science, sociology, anthropology, international relations and management. It then reviews five cross-cutting themes: a) the dichotomy between policy-making and implementation; b) the management of change, c) the role of interest groups in the policy process; d) ownership of the policy process; and e) the narrowing of policy alternatives. The paper concludes with a 21-point check-list of 'what makes policy happen'. A glossary of key terms is also provided. The key argument of the paper is that a 'linear model' of policy-making, characterised by objective analysis of options and separation of policy from implementation, is inadequate. Instead, policy and policy implementation are best understood as a 'chaos of purposes and accidents'. A combination of concepts and tools from different disciplines can be deployed to put some order into the chaos, including policy narratives, policy communities, discourse analysis, regime theory, change management, and the role of street-level bureaucrats in implementation

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