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Integrated Emotion-Oriented Care for Older People With ID: Defining and Understanding Intervention Components of a Person-Centered Approach

THALEN, Marloes
VAN OORSOUW, Wietske M W J
VOLKERS, Karin M
TAMINIAU, Elsbeth F
EMBREGTS, Petri J C M
2021

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An increase in descriptive evidence regarding person-centered approaches for older people with intellectual disability (ID) is important, due to increased life expectancy and the present lack of sufficiently underpinned interventions. This is especially true of interventions designed to increase well-being and quality of life. A specific Dutch example is the Integrated Emotion-Oriented Care approach. Despite its status as a good practice, its effectiveness has not yet been proved, nor has descriptive evidence been made available. The primary aims of this qualitative study are to identify the intervention components, to provide demonstrative illustrations and to gain an in-depth understanding of the use of these components in the day-to-day support of older people with ID. A content analysis of five key documents was carried out. Five semi-structured interviews were then conducted with early adopters, followed by a concept mapping study with daily users. The final stage in the data collection process was a series of five focus-group interviews with experts and experienced support staff. The five intervention components of Integrated Emotion-Oriented Care for older people with ID have been systematically identified and described in detail in five narrative summaries drawn up in collaboration with early adopters, experts and experienced support staff. This study provides valuable insights that offer descriptive evidence for Integrated Emotion-Oriented Care in the care for older people with ID. Both implications and possible opportunities for future research are discussed.

Perspectives on Disability and Non-Communicable Diseases in Low- And Middle-Income Countries, With a Focus on Stroke and Dementia

PRYNN, Josephine
KUPER, Hannah
September 2019

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Non-communicable diseases (NCD) and disability are both common, and increasing in magnitude, as a result of population ageing and a shift in disease burden towards chronic conditions. Moreover, disability and NCDs are strongly linked in a two-way association. People living with NCDs may develop impairments, which can cause activity limitations and participation restriction in the absence of supportive personal and environmental factors. In other words, NCDs may lead to disabilities. At the same time, people with disabilities are more vulnerable to NCDs, because of their underlying health condition, and vulnerability to poverty and exclusion from healthcare services. NCD programmes must expand their focus beyond prevention and treatment to incorporate rehabilitation for people living with NCDs, in order to maximize their functioning and well-being. Additionally, access to healthcare needs to be improved for people with disabilities so that they can secure their right to preventive, curative and rehabilitation services. These changes may require new innovations to overcome existing gaps in healthcare capacity, such as an increasing role for mobile technology and task-sharing. This perspective paper discusses these issues, using a particular focus on stroke and dementia in order to clarify these relationships.

 

Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(18), 3488

https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16183488

 

Non-Communicable diseases in an ageing world : a report from the International Longevity Centre UK, HelpAge International and Alzheimer’s Disease International lunch debate

BAMFORD, Sally-Marie
SERRA, Valentina
July 2011

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This report, based on the discussion and recommendations from the expert meeting, presents information about the need for a life-course focus on prevention, treatment, management and related care issues on NCDs and for dementia to be addressed as a global priority for action. "The first part of the report highlights salient policy and political issues on the NCD question and summarises some of the key international developments in this regard. The latter section of the report provides a summary of the presentation by Professor Martin Prince, and identifies some of the key themes which emerged from the meeting"
Expert stakeholder lunch meeting
London, UK
4 May 2011

Call for the recognition of ageing, Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias in the 2011 UN Summit on NCDs

ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE INTERNATIONAL
et al
2011

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This joint position paper highlights that ageing and the associated risk of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias is a key factor for the 21st century’s social and economic sustainability and should therefore be an essential component of the UN’s NCD considerations. This paper outlines seven related considerations for the UN Summit on NCDs and highlights eight recommendations. This paper is useful to anyone interested in NCDs and ageing

World alzheimer report 2010 : the global economic impact of dementia

WIMO, Anders
PRINCE, Martin
2010

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This report provides a global picture of the economic impact of Alzheimer's disease and dementia. "The report includes an estimate of the worldwide cost of dementia, including direct medical costs, direct non-medical costs and costs of informal (family) care. The estimates are broken down by world region and include analysis of the differences between low and high income countries. The report also contains important policy recommendations and makes clear to key decision-makers that doing nothing is not an option"

Ageing and mental health [whole issue]

September 2004

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Older people in low-income countries are more likely to develop mental problems, due to the stress and worries caused by the uncertainties and lack of security. Because of stigma and limited access to health services and treatment, their condition often goes undiagnosed. This issue reflects on how old age and poverty impact on mental health and suggests positive approaches and ways of promoting good mental health, such as the 'guided autobiography' which helps older people to plan their future. Includes articles on how to recognise depression, practical approaches to dementia and how to help carers to cope

10/66 Dementia Research Group

10/66 DEMENTIA RESEARCH GROUP

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The 10/66 Dementia Research Group is a collective of researchers carrying out population-based research into dementia, non-communicable diseases and ageing in low and middle income countries. This website features general information about the group, highlights their research and policy work, and provides details about their participants. Additional sections are given for links to their newsletter, other news items and registration. This website is useful to anyone interested in population-based research into dementia, non-communicable diseases and ageing in low and middle income countries

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