Resources search

HIV/AIDS prevention and care in Mozambique : a socio-cultural approach. Literature and institutional assessment and case studies on Manga, Sofala Province and Morrumbala District, Zambézia Province

UNITED NATIONS EDUCATIONAL, SCIENTIFIC AND CULTURAL ORGANISATION (UNESCO)
June 2002

Expand view

This study aimed to identify cultural issues relevant to HIV and AIDS prevention and care in Mozambique; assess how organisations account for and use cultural resources in their work; assess how socio-cultural factors shape young people's behaviour relative to their sexual health and HIV and AIDS. It involved a literature review, interviews and questionnaires for NGOs and governmental organisations, and a series of case studies, which are documented in the second part of this report

Dying for change : poor people's experience of health and ill-health

DODD, Rebecca
MUNCK, Lise
2002

Expand view

Drawing on the accounts from the World banks ‘Voices of the Poor’ this booklet looks at the intimate link between health and poverty and the need for health to be central to attempts at poverty reduction. Three key lessons are: [1] People view and value their health in a holistic sense, as a balance of physical, psychological and community well-being, consistent with the WHO view of health as ‘a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being, not merely the absence of disease or infirmity. [2] People overwhelmingly link disease and ill-health to poverty, while poverty is also seen in terms of instability, worry, shame, sickness, humiliation and powerless-ness. [3] Health is valued not only in its own right, but because it is crucial to economic survival. Other lessons include: the fact that ‘poor people’ are not homogenous and in particular women and men, and the young and old, experience poverty and ill-health quite differently. Gender differences include the fact that men access and are seen as more entitled to formal health care, while women more often draw on traditional and alternative health services or defer their own treatment. Attitudes of health staff often appalling. Humiliating treatment by health personnel who treat people as ‘worse than dogs’ was a common experience and barrier to getting treatment. Access to health facilities, rarely built in poor areas, and often too costly to access are a problem. WHO concludes that "there can be no real progress on poverty reduction, or improvement in health outcomes, unless economic and social inequities are tackled"

Actes de l'atelier sous-régional pour l'Afrique de l'ouest et centrale

UNITED NATIONS EDUCATIONAL, SCIENTIFIC AND CULTURAL ORGANISATION (UNESCO)
THE JOINT UNITED NATIONS PROGRAM ON HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS)
2002

Expand view

This is a report of feedback from the project "A cultural approach to HIV/AIDS prevention and care". This project urges the need for the culture of population groups to be taken fully into account in the development of HIV/AIDS prevention strategies, projects and programmes

Globalisation guide

AUSTRALIAN ASIA PACIFIC ECONOMIC COOPERATION (APEC) STUDY CENTRE
2002

Expand view

The Globalisation Guide is a resource for students, presenting the arguments of both those who believe globalisation is a force for good and those who believe it is a force for evil. The Australian Apec Study Centre believes it is a force for good, based on the experience of the countries in the Asia-Pacific, where the freeing of trade and integration of economies has brought improvement in prosperity. However, globalisation is a product of capitalism, which undeniably produces losers as well as winners. The development of capitalism will inevitably generate controversy. The guide looks at both sides of the argument, and tries to answer key questions like what is globalisation and when did it start; who are the key players; how does globalisation affect culture; is there an alternative. The guide also provides links to dozens of other websites both pro and anti globalisation

Ethics and the Internet in west Africa : toward an ethical model of integration|Les enjeux éthiques d’Internet en Afrique de l’Ouest : vers un modèle éthique d’intégration

BRUNET, Patrick
TIEMTORE, Oumarou
VETTRAINO-SOULARD, Marie-Claude
2002

Expand view

This book focuses on ethical questions related to the use of the Internet in west Africa. It examines the manner in which the spread of the Internet in Africa raises serious ethical issues; issues that should be identified to ensure that, in the future, the adaptation and integration of Internet technology will be compatible with the development of Africa's nations. The book is based on field suveys in five west African countries, two anglophone and three francophone. For each country, a portrait of Internet users' ethical behaviours was created. The book demonstrates how the Internet, by virtue of its content and how the technology is uses, is creating upheaval in the practices and modes of communication within African communities. The book culminates with a proposed ethical model for the assimilation of the Internet that could serve as a reference for development policies in each of the respective countries and, more broadly, throughout Africa

Community involvement in malaria control and prevention [Chapter 8] | Malaria control during mass population movements and natural disasters

2002

Expand view

This chapter considers malaria control in displaced populations and in the context of complex emergencies, and places community participation (reflecting both understanding and acceptability of interventions) at the centre of both prevention and control of malaria. It finds that the sociocultural context surrounding displacement situations needs to be considered when designing malaria control interventions, and that treatment-seeking behaviours are complex and poorly understood in the context of complex emergencies. It offers suggestions in assessing needs and gathering information to inform project planning

From many lands

NARAYAN, Deepa
PETESCH, Patti
Eds
2002

Expand view

This book presents the experiences of people who are worn down by persistent deprivation, and buffeted by severe shocks they feel ill-equipped to overcome. The stories reveal some of the reasons why poor people remain poor, despite working long hours day after day. They document the frequently demeaning encounters with state, market and civic institutions that distort the well-intended political, economic and social policies. This book focuses on the diversity of poverty in 14 countries and highlights the key findings

A cultural approach to HIV/AIDS prevention and care : UNESCO/UNAIDS research project. Summary of country assessments : an international overview

UNITED NATIONS EDUCATIONAL, SCIENTIFIC AND CULTURAL ORGANISATION (UNESCO)
THE JOINT UNITED NATIONS PROGRAM ON HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS)
2002

Expand view

This overview of the UNESCO project on cultural approaches to HIV and AIDS begins with a description of the programme, its methods and scope. Part two describes the country assessments and identifies common trends and culturally vulnerable groups. It presents a summary of the major findings and lessons, considerations and recommendations for future work

HIV/AIDS- related stigma and discrimination: a conceptual framework and an agenda for action

PARKER, Richard
et al
2002

Expand view

This paper argues the need for a new way of thinking about stigma and discrimination that acknowledges the processes that cause it and addresses them. It suggests a conceptual framework in which stigma and discrimination are seen as social processes designed to produce and reproduce inequalities and maintain social control, rather than as individual actions. It argues that under this framework there is a need for new approaches to research and for programme developments and interventions that engage societies, communities and people who experience stigma and discrimination, while also acknowledging that this needs to be accompanied by laws and policies that protect the rights of people living with HIV and those affected by the HIV/AIDS epidemic

Disability/Postmodernity : embodying disability theory

CORKER, Mairian
SHAKESPEARE, Tom
Eds
2002

Expand view

With contributions from leading scholars around the world, the aim of this book is to demystify the concept of postmodernity and to suggest ways in which it fosters a holistic approach to the study of disability that better represents and reflects the complexity of disabled people's experience. This book provides a contribution to both disability studies and social and cultural theory

Bilingual education in Israel. Final report

BEKERMAN, Zvi
HORENCZYK, Gabriel
November 2001

Expand view

Prospects would appear bleak for attempts to create common educational spaces for Jewish and Arab children, educators and parents in contemporary Israel. The two Jewish Arab schools in Jerusalem and Galilee were set up by the Centre for Jewish Arab Education in Israel (also known as Hand in Hand) in 1998 and have flourished in their modest way, although post-Oslo optimism has given way to heightened tension. This report is analytical and it illuminates the opportunities and challenges of such an endeavour

Introducing the gender perspective in national essential drug programmes

BISILLIAT, Jeanne
February 2001

Expand view

The objective of this document is to provide a conceptual framework to explain the situation of women and men with regard to health and drugs, and to encourage policy makers and programme managers to adopt a gender-sensitive approach. The document draws on and quotes theoretical anthropological literature, and the English version is a relatively poor translation of the French original

Handbook for appropriate communication for behavior change. Culturally appropriate information/education/communication : elaboration and delivery

UNITED NATIONS EDUCATIONAL, SCIENTIFIC AND CULTURAL ORGANISATION (UNESCO). Division of Cultural Policies and Intercultural Dialogue
2001

Expand view

This handbook is part of the UNESCO initiative on HIV and culture. It deals with building culturally appropriate information/education/communication (IEC) material and processes. It aims to tailor the content and pace of action to people's beliefs, value systems, capacity to mobilise, and to modify international and national strategies and policies, project design and field work accordingly. It gives a conceptual introduction to the issue and then presents the methodological research to be carried out (evaluation of the current activities, understanding, sensitising and mobilising cultural references and resources accordingly). It then identifies proposed target audiences and their specific characteristics. It concludes by proposing appropriate IEC models combining message elaboration and delivery

Depression in developing countries : lessons from Zimbabwe

PATEL, Vikram
et al
2001

Expand view

Depression is one of the most important causes of morbidity and disability in developing countries. Zimbabwe, in common with other developing nations, has absolute poverty, economic reform programmes, limited public health services, widespread private and traditional health-care services, civil unrest, cultural diversity and sex inequality. This study looked at research on depression in Zimbabwe over the past 15 years, covering ethnographic and epidemiological studies in a range of populations. The findings are compared with research from other developing and developed countries. The report also examines the validity of the World Health Organization's classifications and medical concepts of depression, the public health implications of depression, and the implications for clinical practice and research in the context of developing countries

Effective learning issues for indigenous children aged 0 - 8 years

MINISTERIAL COUNCIL ON EDUCATION, EMPLOYMENT, TRAINING AND YOUTH AFFAIRS
2001

Expand view

This is a discussion paper by the Taskforce on Indigenous Education within the Ministerial Council on Education, Employment, Training and Youth Affairs in Australia. It focuses on the age group 0-8 years, looking at cultural inclusivity within early childhood education in Australia. It summarises advice on early childhood service provision and access, development and learning stages, cultural and linguistic diversity, literacy and numeracy, and the importance of mutual community capacity building. It identifies five issues that affect Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islands children. These are: (i) low levels of access and participation in early childhood education and parental enrichment programmes, (ii) uneven transition from early childhood practices to the primrary school curriculum, (iii) educators needs a better understanding of children's diversity of experience and diverse cultural capital, (iv) educators need a better understanding of how the literacy and numeracy development of children takes place amonst idigenous multi-linguals and (v) educators and parents need to acquire ' transitional cultural comptenencies' to create sense of community between the home and school.

Handbook for strategy and policy building

UNITED NATIONS EDUCATIONAL, SCIENTIFIC AND CULTURAL ORGANISATION (UNESCO). Division of Cultural Policies and Intercultural Dialogue
2001

Expand view

One of four handbooks derived from the country assessments carried out under UNESCO's 'Cultural approach to HIV/AIDS prevention and care' programme. This handbook presents methods for building culturally-appropriate strategies and policies. It first describes current approaches, and then methods for building a culturally-appropriate response. It details action priorities around communication, prevention education, community-based responses, mobilisation of institutional networks and civil society, and capacity building and sensitisation

Pages

E-bulletin