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Integrating poverty and gender into health programmes : a source book for health professionals : module on malaria

COLL-BLACK, Sarah
2006

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This book aims to raise awareness, knowledge and skills of health professionals with regards to poverty and gender concerns relating to the prevention and control of malaria. It defines malaria, its symptoms and transmission; looks at the links between gender, poverty and malaria; and considers the importance of addressing gender and poverty issues in malaria control programmes and how this can be done. There is also a list of tools and resources to help with this work

TB/HIV : a clinical manual

HARRIS, Anthony D
MAHER, Dermot
2004

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Developments since 1996, particularly in the TB/HIV field, have prompted a second edition of this popular manual which provides a pocket-sized guide to the clinical management of TB, particularly in patients suffering from co-infection with HIV. Designed for use by busy clinicians, the manual aims to promote the best possible diagnosis and treatment in low-income countries where the prevalence of TB and HIV infection is high, case loads are heavy, and laboratory support may be limited. With these needs in mind, the manual combines the latest scientific knowledge about TB and HIV with authoritative advice based on extensive field experience in several of the hardest hit countries. Throughout the manual, tables, flow charts, lists of do's and don'ts, questions and answers, and numerous practical tips are used to facilitate quick reference and correct decisions. Information ranges from advice on how to distinguish TB from other HIV-related pulmonary diseases to the simple reminder that in sub-Saharan Africa, anyone with TB is in a high risk group for HIV. Though primarily addressed to clinicians working at district hospitals in sub-Saharan Africa, the manual is also suitable for use in areas of Asia and South America where the problem of TB and HIV co-infection poses a growing clinical challenge

Vision 2020 : the right to sight. Developing an action plan to prevent blindness at national, provincial and district levels

VISION 2020
LONDON SCHOOL OF HYGIENE AND TROPICAL MEDICINE (LSHTM)
2003

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VISION 2020 is a joint initiative by the WHO and the International Agency for the Prevention of Blindness, which intends to eliminate avoidable blindness (eg caused by cataract, refractive errors, trachoma, vitamin deficiencies, diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma) by the year 2020. The strategy of VISION 2020 is built upon the foundation of community participation. VISION 2020 has the following objectives: implementation of disease control interventions; development of human resources and development of infrastructure. This CD-ROM serves as a toolkit for countries and organisations that want to enforce a VISION 2020 action plan to combat blindness at the national, provincial and/or district level. Relevant background information for planning exercises are provided in the form of reports from expert committees, scientific articles, manuals, guidelines, software packages, websites, and contact addresses. [Abstract courtesy of CAB International]

Maintenance and sustained use of insecticide-treated bednets and curtains three years after a controlled trial in western Kenya

KACHUR, S Patrick
et al
November 1999

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While few questions remain about the efficacy of insecticide-treated materials (ITM) intervention, operational issues around how to implement and sustain ITM projects need attention. This article describes a study of the results of a small-scale ITM intervention trial, 3 years after the project ended, to assess how local attitudes and practices had changed

Incidence of malaria among children living near dams in northern Ethiopia : community based incidence survey

GHEBREYESUS, Tedros A
et al
September 1999

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Describes a study to assess the impact of the construction of microdams on the incidence of malaria in nearby communities in terms of possibly increasing peak incidence and prolonging transmission. Found that overall incidence of malaria for the villages close to the dams was 14.0 episodes per 1000 child months at risk compared with 1.9 in the control villages: a sevenfold ratio. Incidence was significantly higher in both communities at altitudes below 1900 m. Concludes that there is a need for attention to be given to health issues in the implementation of ecological and environmental development programmes, specifically for appropriate malaria control measures to counteract the increased risks near these dams

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