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Optimising the performance of frontline implementers engaged in the NTD programme in Nigeria: lessons for strengthening community health systems for universal health coverage

OLUWULE, A
et al
November 2019

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This research article focuses on optimising the performance of frontline implementers engaged with NTD programme delivery in Nigeria. Three broad themes are examined: technical support, social support and incentives

Qualitative data was collected through participatory stakeholder workshops. Eighteen problem-focused workshops and 20 solution-focussed workshops were held  in 12 selected local government areas (LGA) across two states in Nigeria, Ogun and Kaduna States

 

Human Resources for Health, 2019 Nov 1;17(1):79

doi: 10.1186/s12960-019-0419-8

Disability, CBR & Inclusive Development, Volume 30, No.2, 2019 (Summer 2019)

June 2019

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Research articles are:

 

  • Stereotypes about Adults with Learning Disabilities: Are Professionals a Cut Above the Rest?
     
  • Perceptions of Primary Caregivers about Causes and Risk Factors of Cerebral Palsy in Ashanti Region, Ghana
     
  • Changes in Social Participation of Persons Affected by Leprosy, Before and After Multidrug Therapy, in an Endemic State in Eastern India
     
  • Users’ Satisfaction with Assistive Devices in Afghanistan
     
  • Perceived Benefits and Barriers to Exercise among Physically Active and Non-Active Elderly People

 

Brief reports are:

  • The GRID Network: A Community of Practice for Disability Inclusive Development
     
  • A Preliminary Report of the Audiological Profile of Hearing Impaired Pupils in Inclusive Schools in Lagos State, Nigeria

 

An experiential report is given:

  • MAANASI - A Sustained, Innovative, Integrated Mental Healthcare Model in South India

 

Learning from experience: Guidelines for locally sourced and cost-effective strategies to modify existing household toilets and water access

WORLD VISION
CBM Australia
2018

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This learning resource is the result of a partnership between World Vision Australia and CBM Australia that aims to improve inclusion of people with disabilities in World Vision’s Water, Hygiene and Sanitation (WASH) initiatives, including in Sri Lanka. The guidelines are based on experiences and observations from World Vision’s implementation of the Rural Integrated WASH 3 (RIWASH 3) project in Jaffna District, Northern Province, funded by the Australian Government’s Civil Society WASH Fund 2. The four year project commenced in 2014. It aimed to improve the ability of WASH actors to sustain services, increase adoption of improved hygiene practices, and increase equitable use of water and sanitation facilities of target communities within 11 Grama Niladari Divisions (GNDs) in Jaffna District.

To support disability inclusion within the project, World Vision partnered with CBM Australia. CBM Australia has focused on building capacities of partners for disability
inclusion, fostering connections with local Disabled People’s Organisations, and providing technical guidance on disability inclusion within planned activities. World Vision also partnered with the Northern Province Consortium of the Organizations for the Differently Abled (NPCODA) for disability assessment, technical support and capacity building on inclusion of people with disabilities in the project.

HOME MODIFICATIONS FOR WASH ACCESS
This document is one of two developed in the Jaffna District and describes the strategies which were used to assist people with disabilities to access toilet and water facilities at their own home. The strategies were designed to be low cost and were developed using locally available materials and skills in the Jaffna District of Sri Lanka. Houses and toilet structures in the region were made of brick and concrete. No new toilets were built and modifications involved only minor work to existing household structures, water points and toilets.

NOTE:
The development of this learning resource was funded by the Australian Government's Civil Society WASH Fund 2.

Human Rights

www.macao-tz.org
December 2014

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Malezi AIDS Care Awareness Organization (MACAO) is a non-profit organization reaching out to neglected Indigenous people in Ngorongoro District, Arusha Region of Northern Tanzania.  Macao founded in 2003, Macao is a humanitarian organization that provides assistance to approximately 200,000 Indigenous Maasai community in Ngorongoro district for addressing needs of water and sanitation, food security, health Care Research, Education, Research environment, Maasai Traditional Research, Human Rights and sustainable economic development by strengthening their livelihoods.  In addition to responding to major relief situations, MACAO focuses on long-term community development through over 4 Area Development Project. We welcome the donors and volunteers to join us in this programs, we are wolking in ruro villages.

The evolution of community physiotherapy in India

RAJAN, Pavithra
February 2014

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Despite the urgent need for physiotherapy services for underprivileged communities, Community Physiotherapy is not a sought-after specialisation in India. Physiotherapists tend to serve in institutions rather than at community level, as a result of which this field of healthcare has stagnated. This article, based on an interview with one of the country’s eminent community physiotherapists, gives a first person account of the evolution of community physiotherapy in India and provides qualitative inputs to deal with the prevalent issues. While the need for services has increased, there has been no matching growth in the pool of physiotherapists willing to work in the community. Several recommendations have been made, including changes in approach to community physiotherapy by both physiotherapists as well as community organisations in India.

Disability in people affected by leprosy : the role of impairment, activity, social participation, stigma and discrimination

VAN BRAKEL, W. H.
et al
2012

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"Leprosy-related disability is a challenge to public health, and social and rehabilitation services in endemic countries. Disability is more than a mere physical dysfunction, and includes activity limitations, stigma, discrimination, and social participation restrictions." This paper assesses the extent of disability and its determinants among persons with leprosy-related disabilities after release from multi drug treatment
Global Health Action, Vol 5

Developing intervention strategies to improve community health worker motivation and performance

FRANK, Tine
KALLANDER, Karin
2012

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"This 28-page learning paper describes Malaria Consortium’s experience with Integrated Community Case Management (ICCM) in malaria prevention and treatment in Mozambique and Uganda. ICCM is an approach where community-based health workers are trained to identify, treat, and refer complex cases malaria (and other diseases) in children"
The Learning Series Papers

Guidelines to reduce stigma : guide 3|A roadmap to stigma reduction : an empowerment intervention

CROSS, Hugh
et al
2011

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"This guide is part of a series of four Guides to reduce stigma. The guides are for all managers, health and social workers and service staff who have to deal with stigma in leprosy and other health conditions. These Guides provide evidence-based and best-practice information from different disciplines, and recommendations for field workers on how to reduce stigma against and among affected persons and in the community...The third Guide provides recommendations on how to develop an approach for reducing stigma. Through the use of a roadmap, several steps are discussed for reducing stigma related to a particular health condition"

Is doing good "good" : professional motives vs. community needs

POLLARD, Nick
SAKELLARIOU, Dikaios
2009

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"This paper offers a critical discussion of the goodness of fit between professional motives and community needs in the field of community-based rehabilitation (CBR). Data were drawn from the authors’ involvement in a survey of occupational therapists involved in CBR and a search of CINAHL, PsychInfo and Medline online databases for related descriptive and analytical articles. Due to cultural differences and time constraints CBR professionals often are, and remain, ‘outsiders’ to the community they are working with. The focus of CBR is sometimes uncertain. Professional motives do not always meet community needs and good intentions do not necessarily transpire into sustainable, culturally appropriate action. The involvement of the community in all stages of programme development and implementation is important both to ensure relevancy and build alliances with the community. CBR needs to be approached and evaluated as a unique area of professional practice"
Asia Pacific Disability Development Journal, Vol 20, No 2

Best practices in the socio-economic rehabilitation of persons affected by leprosy and other marginalised people in their communities: findings from nine evaluations in Bangladesh, India and Africa.

VELEEMA, Johan P
2008

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The evaluation of 9 socio-economic rehabilitation programmes (SER), in 4 countries in Africa, in Bangladesh and in India from 2002-2005 is presented. All the 9 programmes focused on supporting individual leprosy-affected individuals or their families. Four projects also supported other marginalised clients. The usual interventions were micro-credit, housing and sponsoring of education for the children. The recommendations touched upon each of the five steps in individual rehabilitation: selection of clients, needs assessment, choosing an intervention, monitoring/follow--up of clients during rehabilitation, and separation at the end of the process. The evaluators also suggested ways in which participation of the client in their own rehabilitation might be boosted, made recommendations for the organisational structure of programmes, on maximising community involvement and emphasised the importance of information systems and of investing in the programme staff. A number of recommendations were specific to the types of interventions implemented. Bringing together the recommendations resulted in a description of best practices in the implementation of SER programmes, derived from actual experiences in different contexts.
Asia Pacific Disability Rehabilitation Journal, vol.19, no.1, 2008

Operational guide for implementation of IICCHAA project

INDIAN INITIATIVE OF CHILD CENTRED HIV & AIDS APPROACH (IICCHAA)
2008

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This operational guide provides a broad direction for implementing memory work in India in the field, based on a communication needs assessment carried out as part of the Indian Initiative for Child Centred Approaches to HIV & AIDS (IICCHAA). The guide is divided into two sections: how to roll out the training effectively at field level and some basic information about HIV and AIDS

Community-based management of severe acute malnutrition : a joint statement by the World Health Organization, the World Food Programme, the United Nations System Standing Committee on Nutrition and the United Nations Children's Fund

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
et al
2007

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This statement advocates a community-based approach to the management of severe malnutrition, combined with a facility-based approach for those malnourished children with medical complications. It outlines actions that countries can take and suggests how WHO, WFP, SCN, UNICEF and other partners can support these actions

Let's talk about HIV counselling and testing : facilitators' guide

International HIV/AIDS Alliance
December 2006

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This is a toolkit to help NGOs and community-based organisations working to mobilise communities to improve their awareness of HIV counselling and testing and to improve the up-take of HIV counselling and testing; advocating for increased access to quality HIV counselling, testing, care, treatment and prevention; or interested in providing HIV counselling and testing services. It is divided into eight sections: What is HIV and what is AIDS?; what is involved in HIV counselling and testing; who is providing these services in the community and who they are for; the advantages and barriers of counselling and testing; stigma, discrimination and confidentiality; the needs of people after being tested and ideas for community activities. Each section has an accompanying information sheet

Treatment literacy : empowering communities to access AIDS treatment

DUNN, Alison
October 2006

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This paper explores the contribution of information and communication strategies to universal access to anti-retroviral treatment. It suggests that people taking antiretroviral drugs and their supporters need to understand new and complex ideas around drugs, side effects, nutrition and positive living. Treatment literacy aims to help individuals and communities understand why ARV treatment is needed, and what it can and cannot do. Effective treatment literacy, developed by or with people living with HIV and AIDS and those taking ART, can lead to improved health outcomes, better adherence to drug regimes and higher uptake of voluntary counselling and testing. Current resources and community capacity to understand and support antiretroviral therapy are not sufficient

ILEP learning guide four : how to prevent disability in leprosy

CROSS, Hugh
MAHATO, Margaret
2006

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"This book is for all health workers who may have to help people who have nerve damage to their eyes, hands and feet. It will help them to encourage patients to develop a lifetime habit of caring for nerve-damaged parts. The content of this book complements the recommendations in the Operational Guidelines of the World Health Organization"
Note: This resource is available to download in three parts

Community based counselling for people affected by HIV and AIDS

WINIARSKI, Mark G
March 2005

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"This book is written for men and women who have had no formal training in counselling, but feel called to help their neighbours respond to the HIV and AIDS epidemic. It can also inform psychologists, teachers, social workers and other people working in Africa who want to know more about HIV and AIDS counselling issues"

The journey of life : a community workshop to support children

REGIONAL PSYCHOSOCIAL SUPPORT INITIATIVE (REPSSI)
June 2004

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'The Journey of Life' is a community workshop curriculum to support children. This workshop seeks to address the increasing psychological and social needs of children affected by HIV/AIDS, war, and displacement. Its objective is to raise community awareness of the problems that children face growing up in a time of HIV/AIDS, war, and family disintegration. 'The Journey of Life' assists the community to identify children in need of social, emotional, intellectual, spiritual, and physical support. Through dialogue and reflection the community better understands how to use available resources in solving the problems that children encounter and to strengthen the resilience of their children. The workshop covers the areas of meeting children's needs; understanding children's problems; identifying children who need help; building children's strengths; and community mobilisation. The workshop manual can be used without additional training, though further training has been found to be helpful. A Facilitator's Guide accompanies the workshop

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