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Optimising the performance of frontline implementers engaged in the NTD programme in Nigeria: lessons for strengthening community health systems for universal health coverage

OLUWULE, A
et al
November 2019

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This research article focuses on optimising the performance of frontline implementers engaged with NTD programme delivery in Nigeria. Three broad themes are examined: technical support, social support and incentives

Qualitative data was collected through participatory stakeholder workshops. Eighteen problem-focused workshops and 20 solution-focussed workshops were held  in 12 selected local government areas (LGA) across two states in Nigeria, Ogun and Kaduna States

 

Human Resources for Health, 2019 Nov 1;17(1):79

doi: 10.1186/s12960-019-0419-8

Disability, CBR & Inclusive Development, Volume 30, No.2, 2019 (Summer 2019)

June 2019

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Research articles are:

 

  • Stereotypes about Adults with Learning Disabilities: Are Professionals a Cut Above the Rest?
     
  • Perceptions of Primary Caregivers about Causes and Risk Factors of Cerebral Palsy in Ashanti Region, Ghana
     
  • Changes in Social Participation of Persons Affected by Leprosy, Before and After Multidrug Therapy, in an Endemic State in Eastern India
     
  • Users’ Satisfaction with Assistive Devices in Afghanistan
     
  • Perceived Benefits and Barriers to Exercise among Physically Active and Non-Active Elderly People

 

Brief reports are:

  • The GRID Network: A Community of Practice for Disability Inclusive Development
     
  • A Preliminary Report of the Audiological Profile of Hearing Impaired Pupils in Inclusive Schools in Lagos State, Nigeria

 

An experiential report is given:

  • MAANASI - A Sustained, Innovative, Integrated Mental Healthcare Model in South India

 

Community mental health: Theory, practices and perspectives

WYNGAERDEN, Francois
May 2018

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Mental health problems are commonplace and affect more than one in four people worldwide. They are responsible for a quarter of all disabilities. This document aims to provide a basis for exploring these concepts as part of more in-depth work, including an update of the 2011 mental health framework document.

 

A seminar was held in Kigali, Rwanda on 7 - 9 December 2017. It brought together 45 participants from 12 countries to think about and discuss community mental health concepts and practices. The objectives of this document are twofold:

• Set out analysis by an external expert, with a focus on community mental health at HI, in light of the literature and concepts and practices within the sector

• Undertake preliminary work to identify new concepts for implementation, based on the aspects covered in the seminar, as part of ongoing in-depth work in this area, including the updating of the 2011 mental health framework document.

 

Case histories from Rwanda, Lebanon and Madascagar are given. There is an extensive bibliography in the Annex

 

This document is intended for HI and partner staff members who work in the mental health and psychosocial support sector. It is also intended for HI staff working on mental health strategy. It can also be used to feed into the work of field staff developing, implementing and assessing mental health and psychsocial support programmes

Guidance on disability inclusion for GBV (gender based violence) partners in Lebanon: outreach, safe identification, and referral of women, children and youth with disabilities

WOMEN'S REFUGEE COMMISSION
UNICEF LEBANON
February 2018

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This guidance, and the associated toolkit, are designed to support frontline workers, community volunteers, and mobilizers and their supervisors who are working in GBV prevention and response to foster inclusion of persons with disabilities in their community activities. It includes guidance, key actions and tools to improve accessibility of existing community processes and activities relating to GBV. This resource has been developed based on the findings of a needs assessment conducted in 2017 which confirmed that women, children and youth with disabilities in Lebanon and their caregivers are facing a range of GBV-related risks.

Learning from experience: Guidelines for locally sourced and cost-effective strategies to modify existing household toilets and water access

WORLD VISION
CBM Australia
2018

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This learning resource is the result of a partnership between World Vision Australia and CBM Australia that aims to improve inclusion of people with disabilities in World Vision’s Water, Hygiene and Sanitation (WASH) initiatives, including in Sri Lanka. The guidelines are based on experiences and observations from World Vision’s implementation of the Rural Integrated WASH 3 (RIWASH 3) project in Jaffna District, Northern Province, funded by the Australian Government’s Civil Society WASH Fund 2. The four year project commenced in 2014. It aimed to improve the ability of WASH actors to sustain services, increase adoption of improved hygiene practices, and increase equitable use of water and sanitation facilities of target communities within 11 Grama Niladari Divisions (GNDs) in Jaffna District.

To support disability inclusion within the project, World Vision partnered with CBM Australia. CBM Australia has focused on building capacities of partners for disability
inclusion, fostering connections with local Disabled People’s Organisations, and providing technical guidance on disability inclusion within planned activities. World Vision also partnered with the Northern Province Consortium of the Organizations for the Differently Abled (NPCODA) for disability assessment, technical support and capacity building on inclusion of people with disabilities in the project.

HOME MODIFICATIONS FOR WASH ACCESS
This document is one of two developed in the Jaffna District and describes the strategies which were used to assist people with disabilities to access toilet and water facilities at their own home. The strategies were designed to be low cost and were developed using locally available materials and skills in the Jaffna District of Sri Lanka. Houses and toilet structures in the region were made of brick and concrete. No new toilets were built and modifications involved only minor work to existing household structures, water points and toilets.

NOTE:
The development of this learning resource was funded by the Australian Government's Civil Society WASH Fund 2.

Innovations In Dementia

ROUTLEDGE, Martin
SANDERSON, Helen
BAILEY, Gill
October 2016

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This book offers concrete ideas and examples to those interested in driving a radically different approach to supporting people with dementia and their families. "We have explored a number of approaches with people who have been leading their development. We have been keen to look at both approaches that emerge from working directly to improve support for people with dementia and others that have different roots, but we think are potentially very transferable. None of the approaches is yet being used at any significant scale". Discussions and examples are all UK based. There is an introduction detailing current problems and issues with care and support for people with dementia. 10 approaches are described for housing and support, 4 concerned with enabling people to have good days and 7 associated with enabling people to connect with their community. 

UNICEF’S STRATEGY FOR HEALTH (2016-2030) (full version)

UNICEF
August 2016

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For the five year period 2016-2020, UNICEF’s Strategy for Health sets two overarching goals: 1. End preventable maternal, newborn and child deaths 2. Promote the health and development of all children. To achieve these goals, the Strategy considers the health needs of the child at all life stages. It highlights the need for intensified efforts to address growing inequities in health outcomes, including a particular focus on addressing gender-specific needs and barriers that may determine whether boys and girls are able to reach their full potential in health and well-being. Working together with global and local partners, UNICEF will promote three approaches to contribute to these goals: addressing inequities in health outcomes; strengthening health systems including emergency preparedness, response and resilience; and promoting integrated, multisectoral policies and programmes. The three approaches described underpin a "menu of actions” from which country offices can select, based on their situation analysis, country programme focus, and context. 

Zika virus

HESPERIAN HEALTH GUIDES
February 2016

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A short introduction to the Zika virus and pregnancy. This resources details the signs of the Zika virus and the difference between Zika virus, dengue, chikungunya, or malaria are outlined. How the mosquito spreads the disease, the prevention of mosquito bites, ways in which communities can prevent mosquito illnesses and removal of mosquito breeding sites from around the house and community are also covered

 

Note: resource is available online and in downloadable pdf formats

Capturing the difference we make. Community-based rehabilitation indicators manual

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION
2015

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"WHO and the International Disability and Development Consortium (IDDC) have worked together to develop the indicators presented in this manual that capture the difference CBR makes in the lives of people with disabilities in the communities where it is implemented. This manual presents these (base and supplementary) indicators and provides simple guidance on collecting the data needed to inform them. The indicators have been developed to show the difference between people living with a disability and their families and those without disabilities in relation to the information reported in the indicators. This comparability provides valuable information to CBR managers, donors and government agencies alike, which can be used to guide decision-making, support advocacy and improve accountability. Further, the ability of the indicators to provide a comparison of the populations of persons with disability to persons without disability aligns with the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), which states that persons with disability have equal rights to those without disabilities." 

Human Rights

www.macao-tz.org
December 2014

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Malezi AIDS Care Awareness Organization (MACAO) is a non-profit organization reaching out to neglected Indigenous people in Ngorongoro District, Arusha Region of Northern Tanzania.  Macao founded in 2003, Macao is a humanitarian organization that provides assistance to approximately 200,000 Indigenous Maasai community in Ngorongoro district for addressing needs of water and sanitation, food security, health Care Research, Education, Research environment, Maasai Traditional Research, Human Rights and sustainable economic development by strengthening their livelihoods.  In addition to responding to major relief situations, MACAO focuses on long-term community development through over 4 Area Development Project. We welcome the donors and volunteers to join us in this programs, we are wolking in ruro villages.

Positive practices in disability inclusion : "we all have a role" : the valuable contributions of persons with disabilities in community outreach

WOMEN'S REFUGEE COMMISSION
United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR)
September 2014

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The Women's Refugee Commission identified and documented positive practices for disability inclusion in community center and outreach programming, in partnership with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and its partners in Lebanon. This article discusses the inclusion of people with disabilities in the Refugee Outreach Volunteer (ROV) network. ROVs are refugees who volunteer to provide insight into protection priorities, identify community-based solutions and refer refugees in need of urgent support

Positive practices in disability inclusion : "socialize, not stigmatize" : including children with disabilities in child-friendly spaces

WOMEN'S REFUGEE COMMISSION
International Medical Corps (IMC)
United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR)
September 2014

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The Women's Refugee Commission identified and documented positive practices for disability inclusion in community center and outreach programming, in partnership with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and its partners in Lebanon. Child-friendly spaces are being established at community centers, in order to provide access to a safe environment where children can access psychological support, and health and education initiatives. This article discusses how International Medical Corps is approaching the inclusion of children with disabilities in these child friendly spaces

 

 

Positive practices in disability inclusion : "it starts with building trust" : from outreach to the community center

WOMEN'S REFUGEE COMMISSION
INTERSOS
United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR)
September 2014

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The Women's Refugee Commission identified and documented positive practices for disability inclusion in community center and outreach programming, in partnership with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and its partners in Lebanon. This article discusses how INTERSOS have been using the expanding network of Refugee Outreach Volunteers (ROVs) and community centers to promote inclusion and access for people with disabilities and their families

Positive practices in disability inclusion : "taking a team approach" : overcoming barriers, starting with attitudes

WOMEN'S REFUGEE COMMISSION
Caritas Lebanon Migrants Center
United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR)
September 2014

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The Women's Refugee Commission identified and documented positive practices for disability inclusion in community center and outreach programming, in partnership with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and its partners in Lebanon. This article discusses how a Caritas-supported Community Center has promoted the inclusion of people with disabilities through their approaches to encourage and facilitate participation in program activities

 

 

The evolution of community physiotherapy in India

RAJAN, Pavithra
February 2014

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Despite the urgent need for physiotherapy services for underprivileged communities, Community Physiotherapy is not a sought-after specialisation in India. Physiotherapists tend to serve in institutions rather than at community level, as a result of which this field of healthcare has stagnated. This article, based on an interview with one of the country’s eminent community physiotherapists, gives a first person account of the evolution of community physiotherapy in India and provides qualitative inputs to deal with the prevalent issues. While the need for services has increased, there has been no matching growth in the pool of physiotherapists willing to work in the community. Several recommendations have been made, including changes in approach to community physiotherapy by both physiotherapists as well as community organisations in India.

Compendium of accessible WASH technologies

JONES, Hazel
WILBUR, Jane
2014

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This compendium of accessible WASH technologies is designed for use by staff, such as health workers and community volunteers, working directly with communities in rural areas of sub-Saharan Africa. A few examples of technologies are presented that families can adapt to suit their needs and budgets with many more options possible. Most of the ideas are geared towards disabled and older people, but are suitable for anyone who may have difficulty using standard facilities, such as pregnant women, children and people who are ill. The main focus is on household facilities, although some ideas might be useful for institutional facilities as well

Inclusive disaster risk management : a framework and toolkit

FERRETTI, Silva
KHAMIS, Marion
2014

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This framework and toolkit have been designed to support practitioners in challenging and deepening inclusiveness in their work. They have been designed in simple language, so the resource should be easy to adapt for the use of field staff as a complement to existing manuals and operational resources on DRM. The practical framework contains the following sections:introduction, framework for inclusive DRM, levels of achievements, and assessing inclusiveness, using the framework for,  annexes and Q&A. Throughout the resource, related resources and checklists are provided and the toolbox features cartoons, tools catalogue, learning pills, case studies, poster and 4D lenses. These resources are useful for practitioners who want to develop an understanding of inclusive DRM framework and to learn how to practically assess inclusiveness in in ongoing DRM situations

Manual on disability inclusive community-based disaster risk management

MALTESER INTERNATIONAL INCLUSIVE DRR ADVISOR AND PROJECT TEAM IN VIETNAM
et al
December 2013

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"This manual provides specific tips and recommendations on how to include people with disabilities in community-based disaster risk management (CBDRM) work; these tips are applicable to other socially marginalized groups such as illiterate people or ethnic minorities"

Gender inclusion for social resilience : a key factor in disaster risk reduction

POURNIK, Milad
CHUNG, Jaeeun
MILLER, Barbara
December 2012

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"This report offers a brief review of the concept of social resilience, especially in relation to natural disasters and with specific attention to women and girls as victims of disasters and active participants in disaster prevention and response. It next provides a summary of a conference that took place at the George Washington University's Elliott School of International Affairs on October 11, 2012, marking the United Nations International Day for Disaster Reduction and its 2012 theme, Women & Girls: The inVisible Source of Resilience. Last, it summarizes how social resilience can create more secure societies in a changing world"

Global Gender Program, Occasional Paper #2

Common European guidelines on the transition from institutional to community based care|Guidance on implementing and supporting a sustained transition from institutional care to family-based and community-based alternatives for children, persons with dis

THE EUROPEAN EXPERT GROUP ON THE TRANSITION FROM INSTITUTIONAL TO COMMUNITY BASED CARE (EEG)
November 2012

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These guidelines "provide practical advice about how to make a sustained transition from institutional care to family-based and community based alternatives for individuals currently living in institutions and those living in the community, often without adequate support. The Guidelines are aimed primarily at policy and decision makers in the European Union and the neighbouring countries with responsibility for the provision of care and support services for children, people with disabilities and their families, people with mental health problems and older people"

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