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School and classroom disabilities inclusion guide for low- and middle-income countries

BULAT, Jennae
HAYES, Anne
et al
January 2017

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This guide provides strategies and recommendations for developing inclusive classrooms and schools. We specifically address the needs of Sub-Saharan African countries, which lack the resources for implementing inclusive education. However, our strategies and recommendations can be equally useful in other contexts where inclusive education practices have not yet been adopted. Strategies for enhancing existing school and classroom environment and instruction include: modify the physical environment; modify classroom managment strategies; ensure social inclusion; adopt best instructional practices; apply strategies for students with sensory disabilities; and use assistive technologies. Strategies for adopting response to intervention include: tier by tier implementation; individualised education plans; and planning for school wide adoption of inclusive practices and a multilevel system of support.

 

 

Inclusive disaster risk management : briefing paper

SHARMA, Anshu
et al
2014

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This briefing paper  presents the case for building safer, more resilient communities in South Asia using evidence-based inclusive approaches to Disaster Risk Management (DRM) through multi-stakeholder engagement. It is based on the learning from the Inclusive Community Resilience for Sustainable Disaster Risk Management (INCRISD) South Asia project, currently being implemented in Afghanistan, Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka. It concludes by highlighting ten recommendations more inclusive Disaster Risk Management framework, and, while the paper is based on South Asia experiences, the recommendations and approaches can have global application

Towards the post-2105 framework for disaster risk reduction (HFA2) : women as a force in resilience building, gender equality in disaster risk reduction

PREVENTION WEB
April 2014

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This paper argues that gender integration and women’s empowerment need to be approached within the paradigm shift in disaster risk reduction (DRR) thinking internationally, as embodied by the development of the post-2015 Framework on Disaster Risk Reduction. The paper outlines the background to the previous international framework, the Hyogo Framework for Action, and why women's integration should be an important priority for any further agreement. The paper then discusses the role and importance of women in DRR, and analyses lessons learned from the Hyogo Framework's implementation. Finally, the authors conclude by presenting a 'way forward' for increasing the inclusion of women in DRR, based on empowerment, data desegregation and local, national and international frameworks

Inclusion international campaign on Article 19 : living in the community

INCLUSION INTERNATIONAL
2012

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This paper provides information about Inclusion International’s campaign on article 19 of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities living in the community. It reviews background information, provides a definition of ‘institution’, and outlines the campaign goals and action plan. It also provides information about how to support the campaign

Developing intervention strategies to improve community health worker motivation and performance

FRANK, Tine
KALLANDER, Karin
2012

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"This 28-page learning paper describes Malaria Consortium’s experience with Integrated Community Case Management (ICCM) in malaria prevention and treatment in Mozambique and Uganda. ICCM is an approach where community-based health workers are trained to identify, treat, and refer complex cases malaria (and other diseases) in children"
The Learning Series Papers

Community attitudes to people with disability : scoping project

THOMPSON, Denise
et al
2011

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"This report investigates current research on community attitudes towards people with disability. It was an initial step towards building an evidence base on Australian community attitudes to people with disability, on the impact of these attitudes, on outcomes for people with disability, and on effective policies for improving community attitudes towards them"
Occasional Paper #39
Note: Available in pdf and word formats

Identifying and supporting vulnerable people in community-led total sanitation : a Bangladesh case study

FAWZI, A
JONES, H
2011

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Community – led sanitation often neglects the poorest and most disadvantaged people in society as they are often unable to participate. This paper looked at the experiences of three CLTS communities in Bangladesh. It found that a well being ranking, amongst other things, should be used to help identify vulnerable members in the community and that vulnerable people themselves strongly believe in the power of CLTS to improve their livelihoods and their importance in the participation of CLTS activities. Furthermore, vulnerable people are motivated to move up the sanitation ladder and most households have made improvements to their latrine. Finally, the installation of toilet seats on latrines to aid disabled people has in some cases decreased the sanitation independence of other household members 

Inclusive local development : how to implement a disability approach at local level

PLANTIER-ROYON, Eric
November 2009

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This policy paper outlines Handicap International's mandate and values in the field of the inclusive local development. It presents the organisation's actions, choices and commitments in the area of local inclusive development, and provides the six main components of projects. Future possibilities and potential limitations are also highlighted. This policy paper is useful to people who have an interest in disability rights and inclusive local development initiatives

Supporting persons living with trauma by rebuilding social and community links : an example of a community-based mental health approach after the Rwandan genocide of the Tutsis

PHAN, Xuan
November 2009

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This report provides an overview of the lessons learned from a Handicap International community-based mental health project for children and adolescents experiencing psychological suffering after the Rwandan genocide of the Tutsis. It highlights successes and limitations of the project, as well as recommendations for the project’s continuation. This report would be of interest to mental health practitioners, mental health service providers and community mental health organisations

The epidemic divide

HEALTH AND CARE DEPARTMENT, INTERNATIONAL FEDERATION OF RED CROSS AND RED CRESCENT SOCIETIES (ICRC)
July 2009

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The burden of epidemics of infectious diseases on the social and economic development of poorer countries is growing, but is not being sufficiently addressed. This paper argues that to reduce the impact of epidemics involves addressing complex issues that include prevention of disease, empowering communities, better access to health services at the community level, availability of health personnel and better infrastructure (especially for water and sanitation)

The active community engagement continuum

RUSSELL, Nancy
et al
July 2008

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The active community engagement continuum (ACE) provides a framework for analysing community engagement in reproductive health and family planning and the role the community plays in institutionalising lasting behaviour and social change. It involves a process that includes the sharing of information with stakeholders and the local community

Best practices in the socio-economic rehabilitation of persons affected by leprosy and other marginalised people in their communities: findings from nine evaluations in Bangladesh, India and Africa.

VELEEMA, Johan P
2008

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The evaluation of 9 socio-economic rehabilitation programmes (SER), in 4 countries in Africa, in Bangladesh and in India from 2002-2005 is presented. All the 9 programmes focused on supporting individual leprosy-affected individuals or their families. Four projects also supported other marginalised clients. The usual interventions were micro-credit, housing and sponsoring of education for the children. The recommendations touched upon each of the five steps in individual rehabilitation: selection of clients, needs assessment, choosing an intervention, monitoring/follow--up of clients during rehabilitation, and separation at the end of the process. The evaluators also suggested ways in which participation of the client in their own rehabilitation might be boosted, made recommendations for the organisational structure of programmes, on maximising community involvement and emphasised the importance of information systems and of investing in the programme staff. A number of recommendations were specific to the types of interventions implemented. Bringing together the recommendations resulted in a description of best practices in the implementation of SER programmes, derived from actual experiences in different contexts.
Asia Pacific Disability Rehabilitation Journal, vol.19, no.1, 2008

Integrated management of pregnancy and childbirth : WHO recommended interventions for improving maternal and newborn health

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO), DEPARTMENT OF MAKING PREGNANCY SAFER
2007

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This paper contains five tables listing recommendations to improve maternal and newborn health and survival, through health services, family and community. Table 1. Care in pregnancy, childbirth and postpartum period for mother and newborn infant; Table 2. Place of care, providers, interventions and commodities; Table 3. Home care, family, community and workplace support for the woman during pregnancy and childbirth and for the newborn infant; Table 4. Care for the woman before and between pregancies; Table 5. Pregnant women not wanting child

Community-based management of severe acute malnutrition : a joint statement by the World Health Organization, the World Food Programme, the United Nations System Standing Committee on Nutrition and the United Nations Children's Fund

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
et al
2007

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This statement advocates a community-based approach to the management of severe malnutrition, combined with a facility-based approach for those malnourished children with medical complications. It outlines actions that countries can take and suggests how WHO, WFP, SCN, UNICEF and other partners can support these actions

Community-based health financing and child health

MAKINEN, Marty
PARTNERS FOR HEALTH REFORMPLUS (PHRplus)
et al
2006

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This brief reports on the effects that membership in community-based health financing schemes has on the use of health services when a member is ill or injured and, specifically, on priority child health services (immunisations, vitamin A supplementation, treatment of diarrhoeal disease, and prevention and treatment of malaria). The results come from household surveys performed by the Partners for Health Reformplus project (PHRplus) in the three West African countries of Ghana, Mali, and Senegal in 2004

Scaling up memory work : the example of KIWAKKUKI in Tanzania

WARD, Nicola
ITEMBA, Dafrosa
2006

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Scaling up the memory work and extending it from Uganda to other African countries involved many challenges due to the wide range of different contexts, different types of implementing organisations and different cultures. This edition of Health Exchange gives an example from Tanzania where the organisation KIWAKKUKI, has developed a memory project based on experience and learning from NACWOLA in Uganda, but adapted to its specific cultural and organisational context

Participatory communication in malaria control : why does it matter?

DUNN, Alison
October 2005

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This paper reviews current approaches to malaria control, focusing on effective ways of engaging with local communities in participatory ways. It argues for considering human behaviour as well as mosquito behaviour in malaria control efforts. Engaging with people at community level is critical to developing interventions that are appropriate to the local context. Complex social and environmental factors, such as gender relationships, the cost of drugs, and the appropriateness of services mean that communication processes are vital, and will require sustained and coordinated international support and commitment

Strenthening service accountability and community participation in health sector reforms

MURTHY, Ranjani K
July 2005

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This policy brief focuses on the need for community participation in the design of policies, legislation and the allocation of budgets as well as the more expected areas of health programme management and service delivery. It is based on a review of community participation and sexual and reproductive health service accountability in World Bank-supported health sector reforms in Africa, Asia and Latin America and the Caribbean

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