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Hear my voice: old age and disability are not a curse. A community-based participatory study gathering the lived experiences of persons with disabilities and older people in Tanzania

MRISHO, Mwifadhi
FAKIH, Bakar
GREENWOOD, Margo
STEFF, Marion
2016

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Community based participatory research (CBPR) was used to provide evidence on the specific nature and experiences of persons with disabilities and older people from their own perspectives in Tanzania, through the lens of social, political, economic and cultural inclusion. The aim was to strengthen efforts to provide services for and improve the lives of people living in the rural and urban settings of Nachingwea and Kibaha Urban Municipal Council. Twenty-nine peer researchers (nine persons with disabilities, 10 older people and 10 Tanzanian Non-Governmental Organisation (NGO) members working in these communities) were involved in the study. A total of 106 stories were collected. Eight priority areas emerged and were chosen by peer researchers for further discussion in groups: access to education and quality learning; access to health services; issues fed back from NGOs; poverty relating to income and dependence; attitudes towards witchcraft and albinism; relationship difficulties and marriage breakdowns; sexual violence and gender issues; poor treatment from family
 

Inclusive Tanzania network : access to education and political participation of persons with disabilities

LIGHT FOR THE WORLD
Ed
October 2014

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MTAJU - Inclusive Tanzania was a pilot project aiming to empower persons with disabilities through inclusive education and political participation that ran from November 2005 to December 2010. MTAJU is a network of Tanzanian Disabled People’s Organizations (DPOs) and Pro Disability Organizations (PDOs), who campaign together for an inclusive society where people with disabilities enjoy the same rights as other citizens. The project's main aims were the legal, political and social establishment of the right to education of children with disabilities and the right to political participation of persons with disabilities. This short learning guide is based on the full project report and highlights the key lessons learned by the project team. This guide would be very useful for anyone interested in the access to education for children with disabilities and the participation of disabled people in public and political life in Africa in particular and the global south in general

Learning Guide, 2/2014

Mental health and development sustaining impact : annual impact report 2009

RAJA, Shoba
DOUGHERTY, Charlotte
2009

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Basicneeds is an organization which aims to reach people with mental illness and epilepsy, to improve their health, financial well-being, and social acceptance. BasicNeeds provides treatment, training and promoted capacity building. This annual report presents BasicNeeds actions in 2009, highlighting their experiences in India, Sri Lanka, Lao PDR, Ghana, Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania, and Nepal

Growing pains : how poverty and AIDS are challenging childhood

SWIFT, Anthony
MAHER, Stan
2008

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This report looks at projects and programmes that aim to respond to the needs of very young children in southern and eastern Africa whose lives have been affected by both poverty and HIV. What is highlighted in the interventions that are examined is the effort of human beings in caring and supporting people and sharing resources

Joining hands: integrating gender and HIV/AIDS: report of an ACORD project using Stepping Stones in Angola, Tanzania and Uganda

HADJIPATERAS, Angela
et al
July 2007

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This is the report of a two-year project to reduce the vulnerability of women and girls in Africa to HIV and AIDS, using Stepping Stones - a gender-focused participatory process that involves working closely with peer groups. The project's other objectives were to: build the capacity of local structures to respond; promote community responses through effective partnerships and advocacy actions; and find out whether Stepping Stones could be used effectively in unconventional settings with a range of population groups such as the nomadic Mucubai tribe in Southern Angola, internally displaced people living in camps in Northern Uganda, and the 21st Battalion of the Angolan armed forces. Key findings include: improvements in the level of knowledge and understanding of HIV/AIDS and increased communication around sexual issues and between couples and within communities, across all three countries, as well as an increased sense of community responsibility for HIV and AIDS. In addition there was patchy evidence of stigma reduction and some reduction in risky cultural and sexual practices. Although increased respect for women, including self respect and a reduction in gender violence was also noted, female subordination in decision making and control over resources remains. Stepping Stones was on the whole considered to be adaptable for use in a wide range of contexts although more thought was needed to develop effective strategies to combat obstacles when using this process in some circumstances

Scaling up memory work : the example of KIWAKKUKI in Tanzania

WARD, Nicola
ITEMBA, Dafrosa
2006

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Scaling up the memory work and extending it from Uganda to other African countries involved many challenges due to the wide range of different contexts, different types of implementing organisations and different cultures. This edition of Health Exchange gives an example from Tanzania where the organisation KIWAKKUKI, has developed a memory project based on experience and learning from NACWOLA in Uganda, but adapted to its specific cultural and organisational context

Situation analysis of youth (health) centres in Tanzania

DETSCHER, Susanne
September 2004

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This study was done to seek best practices in sexual and reproductive health education, by comparing youth (health) centres with different approaches around the country. The average age of visitors was 20.3, and over 2/3 came every day. There are a variety of activities (sport, cultural, information, education and communication (IEC), vocational and health training), and most centres are run by volunteers. Some of the health facilities are not well attended because of poor resources. Most centres are not self sustaining, and those that attempt to be tend to lose sight of their purpose. Young people felt they should have greater ownership of the centres. It was concluded that the ideal youth centre is a resource centre run by young people, with the involvement of the community, youth work specialists, volunteers and youth friendly health care providers, where youth-relevant information, a range of leisure and IEC activities, and counselling is available, as well as opportunities to develop personal skills. However, offering professional health services in Youth centres is most probably not cost-effective, mostly due to low numbers of actual clients

Follow up reproductive health needs assessment in the process of evaluating a CBD programme in Lushoto Division, Lushoto District

KRAUT, Angela
et al
April 2004

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The study is the follow up to a baseline study (2000) on Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Technische Zusammenarbeit (GTZ) GmbH supported Community Based Distribution (CBD) activities in Lushoto Division in Tanzania. The study found that contraceptive prevalence was 43.2%, almost double previous figures, and that women's knowledge of contraceptive methods had increased from 77.1% to 84.4%. CBD agents provide an important 'social link' between communities and the professional health sector. The knowledge of long term methods is high and it seems, in the comparison with non-CBD villages, that CBD agents intensify the demand for these services. The number of unplanned pregnancies has decreased from 58.3% to 26.8%, while a higher proportion of deliveries was attended by health personnel (22% to 37.5%). In the context of this study, it was however not possible to measure the CBD contribution to these changes over time, other contributing factors being difficult to measure

RBM communications assessment : challenges and opportunities in Ghana, Mali, Senegal, Tanzania and Uganda

SHUFFELL, Sara
2004

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This report is from an assessment carried out between October 2002 and April 2003 in Ghana, Mali, Senegal, Tanzania and Uganda. It was part of a Roll Back Malaria Communications Assessment as an initial stage in the process to develop effective and inclusive national malaria communication strategies in RBM participating countries across Africa. It notes the challenges that are raised in the context of development communications in Africa: the absence of basic malaria communications strategies, poor visibility of National Malaria Control Programmes, and lack of regional coordination and information sharing to name a few. There are, however, many opportunities to develop better malaria communications listed in the report

Disability and social responses in some Southern African nations : Angola, Botswana, Burundi, D.R. Congo (ex Zaire), Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Tanzania, Rwanda, Zambia, Zimbabwe. A bibliography, with introduction and some historical items

MILES, M
January 2003

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(From introducton) This bibliography, currently with approx. 1400 items, began in 1996 with a focus on the development of non-medical services concerned with mental retardation (mental handicap, learning difficulties, intellectual impairment) in Zambia. The development of services for people with other disabilities, and for children, and childrearing and language use, and then developments in neighbouring countries, soon began to be added. Then the weight of the new material outgrew the initial focus. Some biomedical papers have been added for their social contents or where a community-based or health education program concerned with biomedical conditions seems relevant to the development of disability awareness in communities. Newspaper and magazine-type articles have mostly been omitted. Available to download from the CIRRIE website

Mobilising the community : a PILLARS guide

CARTER, Isabel
2003

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This guide looks at an example of community mobilisation that is based on using outside facilitators and workshops. However, recognising that resources to employ external facilitators and run such workshops may not be available, it takes the basis of the mobilisation process and shares it in a way that will help a well-organised and motivated group to use the process without outside help. It looks at participatory methodologies that can be used to focus on key community issues, how to gather information, presenting information and planning the action. It will be helpful to small groups or NGOs seeking to bring changes that benefit local people

Understanding community responses to the situation of children affected by AIDS : lessons for external agencies. Draft paper prepared for the UNRISD project HIV/AIDS and Development

FOSTER, Geoff
March 2002

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This is a key report that documents community responses and coping mechanisms towards the HIV/AIDS pandemic in relation to children affected by AIDS (CABA) and orphans and vulnerable children (OVC). Fostering families are under enormous strain and local initiatives at the community level have been little studied or documented, and few organisations have sought to encourage their development. The paper analyses some of these initiatives and encourages external agencies to support them through building the capacity of local responses rather than imposing external solutions

Children with hydrocephalus and spina bifida in East Africa : can family and community resources improve the odds?

MILES, M
2002

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Hydrocephalus and spina bifida are life threatening conditions that often result in severe dsabilities. Risks are much reduced by immediate surgery and careful managment, but neither has been available for most of the sub-Saharan African population. This paper traces the growth of solutions and some socio-cultural resources that historically have supported family and community care for children with severe disabilities, mainly in Tanzania, and nearby countries. Some community-based rehabilitation (CBR) work with children with spina bifida and hydrocephalus is described, and challenges to the CBR approach are noted from the increased survival of people with disabilities requiring complex care. More appropriate information, recognition of indigenous knowledge, enlistment of community resources and financial assistance are needed to enhance the lives of East Africans with hydrocephalus, spina bifida and other severely disabling conditions

Best practices on indigenous knowledge

UNITED NATIONS EDUCATION SCIENCE AND CULTURE ORGANIZATION (UNESCO). Management of Social Transformations Programme (MOST)
NETHERLANDS ORGANIZATION FOR INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION IN HIGHER EDUCATION. Centre for International Research and Advisory Networks (NUFFIC/CIRAN)
Eds
1999

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This publication provides a series of case studies to illustrate how indigenous knowledge (IK) can be used to create sustainable development. It aims to suggest, by example, guidelines for development planning, as the practices described may give policy makers and development practitioners a deeper insight into the ecological and cultural complexity of sustainable development. Includes basic definition of IK and related terms, and indexes by country and theme

The ageing and development report : a summary. Poverty, independence and the world's older people

RANDEL, Judith
GERMAN, Tony
EWING, Deborah
Eds
1999

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This is a summary of a report on the circumstances of older people in developing countries and countries in transition. It has chapters on economic security, health, family and community life, poverty, gender, and emergencies. It also includes information on demographic trends and ageing in specific countries and regions. It is suitable for planners, managers, trainers and students

Innovations in developing countries for people with disabilities

O'TOOLE, Brian
MCCONKEY, Roy
Eds
1995

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A unique resource book for anyone working in community-based services. The 17 chapters have been written by experienced practitioners drawn from various disciplines and across the continents. The chapter are grouped into three main sections - service foundations, meeting needs and developing services - and cover issues as diverse as family involvement, mobilising communities; fund-raising and evaluating services. Since its publication in 1995, the book has been widely used in training courses around the world. It is now available free-of-charge on the internet thanks to the gracious permission of the publishers, Lisieux Hall Publications

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