Resources search

Disability and social responses in some Southern African nations : Angola, Botswana, Burundi, D.R. Congo (ex Zaire), Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Tanzania, Rwanda, Zambia, Zimbabwe. A bibliography, with introduction and some historical items

MILES, M
January 2003

Expand view

(From introducton) This bibliography, currently with approx. 1400 items, began in 1996 with a focus on the development of non-medical services concerned with mental retardation (mental handicap, learning difficulties, intellectual impairment) in Zambia. The development of services for people with other disabilities, and for children, and childrearing and language use, and then developments in neighbouring countries, soon began to be added. Then the weight of the new material outgrew the initial focus. Some biomedical papers have been added for their social contents or where a community-based or health education program concerned with biomedical conditions seems relevant to the development of disability awareness in communities. Newspaper and magazine-type articles have mostly been omitted. Available to download from the CIRRIE website

Mainstreaming HIV/AIDS : looking beyond awareness

WILKINS, Marissa
VASANI, Dolar
2002

Expand view

The social and environmental circumstances that lead vulnerable people to have unprotected sex, exposing them to infections, have to be resolved through addressing the causes of poverty, gender discrimination, and the use of sex as a commodity. This book addresses the impact of HIV without prejudice, by taking a human rights stance. It is useful for trainers, programme planners, policy-makers and CBR programmes

Best practices on indigenous knowledge

UNITED NATIONS EDUCATION SCIENCE AND CULTURE ORGANIZATION (UNESCO). Management of Social Transformations Programme (MOST)
NETHERLANDS ORGANIZATION FOR INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION IN HIGHER EDUCATION. Centre for International Research and Advisory Networks (NUFFIC/CIRAN)
Eds
1999

Expand view

This publication provides a series of case studies to illustrate how indigenous knowledge (IK) can be used to create sustainable development. It aims to suggest, by example, guidelines for development planning, as the practices described may give policy makers and development practitioners a deeper insight into the ecological and cultural complexity of sustainable development. Includes basic definition of IK and related terms, and indexes by country and theme

E-bulletin

Source e-bulletin on Disability and Inclusion

Subscribe to updates