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Positive practices in disability inclusion : "we all have a role" : the valuable contributions of persons with disabilities in community outreach

WOMEN'S REFUGEE COMMISSION
United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR)
September 2014

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The Women's Refugee Commission identified and documented positive practices for disability inclusion in community center and outreach programming, in partnership with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and its partners in Lebanon. This article discusses the inclusion of people with disabilities in the Refugee Outreach Volunteer (ROV) network. ROVs are refugees who volunteer to provide insight into protection priorities, identify community-based solutions and refer refugees in need of urgent support

The evolution of community physiotherapy in India

RAJAN, Pavithra
February 2014

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Despite the urgent need for physiotherapy services for underprivileged communities, Community Physiotherapy is not a sought-after specialisation in India. Physiotherapists tend to serve in institutions rather than at community level, as a result of which this field of healthcare has stagnated. This article, based on an interview with one of the country’s eminent community physiotherapists, gives a first person account of the evolution of community physiotherapy in India and provides qualitative inputs to deal with the prevalent issues. While the need for services has increased, there has been no matching growth in the pool of physiotherapists willing to work in the community. Several recommendations have been made, including changes in approach to community physiotherapy by both physiotherapists as well as community organisations in India.

Refugees with disabilities : increasing inclusion, building community : a discussion tool on improving access and inclusion for displaced persons with disabilities

WOMEN’S REFUGEE COMMISSION
2014

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This presentation is a “tool for raising awareness among community workers, volunteers and displaced people about increasing access and inclusion for persons with disabilities in refugee and displacement contexts. It can be used by staff of organisations working with refugees and displaced persons, as well as community leaders and disability associations conducting sensitisation with the wider refugee community. The tool illustrates common barriers experienced by persons with disabilities in displacement contexts, as well as positive practices or approaches to promote inclusion. Suggested questions provide a guide for facilitators of the discussion, but should be adapted according to the context and audience. The tool is intended to facilitate conversation about concerns and ideas for change at field levels, but is not a comprehensive catalogue of either barriers or solutions in these contexts”

Compendium of accessible WASH technologies

JONES, Hazel
WILBUR, Jane
2014

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This compendium of accessible WASH technologies is designed for use by staff, such as health workers and community volunteers, working directly with communities in rural areas of sub-Saharan Africa. A few examples of technologies are presented that families can adapt to suit their needs and budgets with many more options possible. Most of the ideas are geared towards disabled and older people, but are suitable for anyone who may have difficulty using standard facilities, such as pregnant women, children and people who are ill. The main focus is on household facilities, although some ideas might be useful for institutional facilities as well

UNHCR mental health and psychosocial support for persons of concern

MEYER, Sarah
2013

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"This evaluation reports on how well the United Nations High Commission for Refugees considers and provides for the well-being and mental health of persons of concern to the agency. Through a survey of UNHCR field staff, extensive literature and policy review, and key informant interviews with MHPSS experts from academic institutions, international agencies and non-governmental organizations, this review provides insight into how UNHCR’s current activities contribute towards improved mental health and psychosocial well-being of displaced persons and how UNHCR’s current policy frameworks relate to established practices and frameworks in the MHPSS field"

Who is where, when, doing what (4Ws) in mental health and psychosocial support : manual with activity codes

IASC REFERENCE GROUP FOR MENTAL HEALTH AND PSYCHOSOCIAL SUPPORT IN EMERGENCY SETTINGS
2012

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"Humanitarian actors in emergencies often encounter challenges in knowing Who is Where, When, doing What (4Ws) with regard to mental health and psychosocial support (MHPSS). Such knowledge is essential to inform coordination. 4Ws tools are used in many areas of aid to map activities conducted across large geographical areas". This manual outlines the 4Ws with regard to mental health and psychosocial support for humanitarian actors with MHPSS coordinating responsibilities. The tool exists in two parts: a 4Ws data collection spreadsheets application (in excel online) and this manual which describes how to collect the data

Mental health and psychosocial support for conflict-related sexual violence : principles and interventions

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO) Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse
2012

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This resource outlines principles and interventions in relation to mental health and psychosocial support for conflict-related sexual violence
WHO/RHR/HRP/12.18
"Responding to the psychosocial and mental health needs of sexual violence survivors in conflict-affected Settings"
Ferney-Voltaire, France
28-30 November 2011

Guiding principles for the domestic implementation of a comprehensive system of protection for children associated with armed forces or armed groups

INTERNATIONAL COMMITTEE OF THE RED CROSS (ICRC)
September 2011

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"These Guiding Principles are intended to serve the purpose of promoting and spreading knowledge of international humanitarian law and, in particular, of implementing the provisions protecting children affected by armed conflicts, especially children associated or previously associated with armed forces or armed groups. The Guiding Principles suggest a number of practical, regulatory and legal measures as means to encourage States to improve such protection. They are based mainly on binding international rules (taking into account the specific obligations of all relevant treaties and of customary law). They also refer to widely accepted instruments of a non-binding character ("soft law"). A checklist of the main obligations regarding children associated with armed forces and armed groups is provided in Annex IV"

Integrating early childhood development (ECD) activities into nutrition programmes in emergencies : why, what and how

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
United Nation Children’s Fund (UNICEF)
2011

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"This document is written for local and international staff running nutrition programmes in emergencies, and for local, regional and national authorities and donors involved in such programmes. The note explains WHY nutrition programmes need to include early childhood development (ECD) activities to maximize the child’s development. It provides practical suggestions as to WHAT simple steps are necessary to create integrated programmes in situations of famine or food insecurity and it gives examples of HOW such integrated programmes have been established in other situations"

Guidelines for child-friendly spaces in emergencies

UNITED NATIONS CHILDREN’S FUND (UNICEF)
January 2011

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The purpose of this guideline is "to give practical guidance to the field teams that establish (Child Friendly Spaces) CFSs in different types of emergencies and contexts. They are also intended to guide advocacy efforts and donor practices in emergency settings where protection and well-being ought to be high priorities"

Family friendly! Working with deaf children and their communities worldwide

WILSON, Kirsty
MILES, Susie
KAPLAN, Ian
February 2008

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This comprehensive resource focuses on the important role that parents and families can play in the lives of their deaf child within the larger community. It is written as a guidebook for parents or anyone who wants to learn more about parental involvement in the support of deaf children, but specifically for service providers

Community mobilisation manual

PRIVATE AGENCIES COLLABORATING TOGETHER (PACT), TANZANIA
2007

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This is a "how-to" book, intended for community mobilisers who want to stimulate social change in a community to work towards poverty eradication, good governance, increased transparency -- in short community empowerment. This manual identifies key steps in the community mobilisation process; it stresses the role and responsibility of the community leader or coordinator of an activity, community networks and other Civil Society groups, including local citizens

Our right to be protected from violence : activities for learning and taking action for children and young people

FOUNTAIN, Susan
2007

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This booklet is aimed at adults, youth leaders and peer educators that work with groups of young people aged 12-18. It highlights information on the UN Study on Violence Against Children, and suggests many different activities that can be used when working with young people on issues of violence and abuse. The material provides useful ideas on how to communicate and talk about issues of violence and abuse for educators and youth leaders who work with youth groups

Protecting children from sexual exploitation and sexual violence in disaster and emergency situations

DELANEY, Stephanie
March 2006

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"This manual, as the title suggests, is about how to protect children from sexual violence and sexual exploitation, specifically in disaster and emergency situations. It is not intended to be an academic report but instead is a practical guide that we hope will be of use to people working directly in the field. The aim is to provide fundamental information to assist personnel working in emergency situations in responding to protect children, in terms of what can be done before disaster strikes (which might be called ‘mitigation’ efforts), in the immediate aftermath (the ‘response’) and in the longer term reconstruction phase (sometimes called the ‘recovery’). We have also included recommended actions and key considerations to be taken into account in the event of sexual violence or sexual exploitation"

Follow up reproductive health needs assessment in the process of evaluating a CBD programme in Lushoto Division, Lushoto District

KRAUT, Angela
et al
April 2004

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The study is the follow up to a baseline study (2000) on Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Technische Zusammenarbeit (GTZ) GmbH supported Community Based Distribution (CBD) activities in Lushoto Division in Tanzania. The study found that contraceptive prevalence was 43.2%, almost double previous figures, and that women's knowledge of contraceptive methods had increased from 77.1% to 84.4%. CBD agents provide an important 'social link' between communities and the professional health sector. The knowledge of long term methods is high and it seems, in the comparison with non-CBD villages, that CBD agents intensify the demand for these services. The number of unplanned pregnancies has decreased from 58.3% to 26.8%, while a higher proportion of deliveries was attended by health personnel (22% to 37.5%). In the context of this study, it was however not possible to measure the CBD contribution to these changes over time, other contributing factors being difficult to measure

An inter-country study of expectations, roles, attitudes and behaviours of community-based rehabilitation volunteers

SHARMA, Manoj
DEEPAK, Sunil
July 2003

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"[T]his study gathered information from CBR volunteers in Eritrea, Egypt, India, Mongolia, Papua New Guinea, Pakistan, and Vietnam (n=176) regarding their expectations, roles, attitudes and behaviours pertaining to CBR work. The survey revealed that majority of CBR volunteers volunteered their time as a personal decision (63%) and were not personally disabled (84%). It was found that satisfaction from CBR work was directly related to self-efficacy or behaviour specific confidence in their ability to perform CBR-related tasks, while inverse and significant relationships were found with barriers and outcome expectations. Thus, for retaining volunteers, CBR projects need to provide educational activities that build self-efficacy of volunteers to fulfill CBR-related tasks and reduce barriers"
Asia Pacific Disability Rehabilitation Journal, Vol 14, No 2

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