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Guidance on disability inclusion for GBV (gender based violence) partners in Lebanon: outreach, safe identification, and referral of women, children and youth with disabilities

WOMEN'S REFUGEE COMMISSION
UNICEF LEBANON
February 2018

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This guidance, and the associated toolkit, are designed to support frontline workers, community volunteers, and mobilizers and their supervisors who are working in GBV prevention and response to foster inclusion of persons with disabilities in their community activities. It includes guidance, key actions and tools to improve accessibility of existing community processes and activities relating to GBV. This resource has been developed based on the findings of a needs assessment conducted in 2017 which confirmed that women, children and youth with disabilities in Lebanon and their caregivers are facing a range of GBV-related risks.

Disability-inclusive social protection research in Nepal: A national overview with a case study from Tanahun district

BANKS, Lena M
et al
2018

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Social protection programmes are increasingly being adopted in low- and middle-income countries as a set of strategies for poverty reduction, improving livelihoods and decreasing inequality. Due to high levels of poverty and social exclusion, people with disabilities – who comprise upwards of 15% of the global population – have been identified as a key target group for inclusion in social protection, in both international guidelines and in national strategies. However, there is currently a lack of evidence on whether these programmes are adequately reaching and meeting the needs of people with disabilities.

The aim of this research was to assess the extent to which social protection systems in Nepal and Vietnam address the needs of people with disabilities. This research uses a mixed methods approach, combining a national policy analysis with district-level qualitative and quantitative studies in each country

INCLUDE US! Good practices in the inclusion of persons with disabilities in Myanmar

HUMANITY & INCLUSION (HI)
2018

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In 2015, Humanity & Inclusion HI began the project: “Empowering persons with disabilities to contribute to equal access to basic social services and local policymaking processes in under-resourced areas of Ayeyarwady and Mandalay”. The project supported Disabled Peoples Organizations and other civil society groups to participate in the development of inclusive regional policies and programmes, and to promote good practices contributing to greater access to services for persons with disabilities. An aim was also to document, publish and disseminate these good practices throughout Myanmar, increasing awareness and understanding in order to sensitise people to disability inclusion and influence policy change. Rather than focusing on what is not working, this report seeks to shift attention to what has worked locally and how it could be replicated in other parts of the country, providing constructive, practical recommendations to decision-makers, service providers and other community groups in Myanmar. The report is related to two projects. The second is “Advocacy for Change: Fostering protection and rights of men and women with disabilities in Myanmar”. 

 

There are global recommendations. There are seven good practices:

  • Related to education:  Case Study I: Promoting Inclusion of children with disabilities in Middle Schools of Ayartaw. Case Study II: How the development of the teacher training promotes inclusion of all children in education
  • Related to economic life: Case Study III: How partnerships between private companies and organizations of people with disabilities can improve access to employment and vocational training
  • Related to social/community life: Case Study IV: Giving the Myanmar Deaf Community access to information.  Case Study V: How parental advocacy can make a difference
  • Related to political life: Case Study VI: Community advocacy in obtaining the National Registration Card. Case Study VII: Supporting people with disabilities to participate in Myanmar elections

 

Good practices for the implementation of the CRPD in Indonesia (2015-2017) - Making it Work

HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL
WIDJAYA, Hartaning
2018

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In Indonesia, the Advocacy for Change project aimed to increase the effective participation of people with disabilities in inclusive development efforts at the local level, and promote their participation in development at the national level. Specifically, the Advocacy for Change project sought to improve and monitor the people with disabilities' access to local government processes and existing social services.

Six case studies are presented:

  • Community Based Forum as Community Public Space (The culture is the key)
  • Building the Foundation of Inclusion with Sendangadi Village Government
  • WKCP (Cerebral Palsy Family Association) Health Initiative for Health Budgeting Advocacy
  • Citizen Based Forum as a Common Space to Encourage the Government to Build a Disability-Friendly Village in Mata Air Village, Kupang Tengah Sub- district, Kupang District
  • Inclusion of Disabled Persons in Noelbaki Village Women's Forum 
  • The role of disabled people organization in participation of development with Bappeda Kupang Municipality

 

The right to live independently and be included in the community : Addressing barriers to independent living across the globe

ANGLELOVA-MLADENOVA, Lilia
June 2017

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This reports looks at the main barriers to the realisation of disabled people’s right to live independently and be included in the community, which is set out in Article 19 of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). They are grouped in seven broad areas: (1) misunderstanding and misuse of key terms, (2) negative attitudes and stigma, (3) lack of support for families, (4) prevalence of institutional services, (5) barriers related to community support services, (6) barriers in mainstream services and facilities, and (7) barriers, concerning other CRPD provisions, with effect on Article 19. A set of recommendations is also provided, outlining measures required to address these barriers.

The recommendations in this report – presented below - were shared with the UN Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities when they were drafting the General Comment on Article 19. They can be used by governments and civil society organisations, alongside the General Comment, to identify actions needed to implement Article 191 CRPD.

 

Disability, CBR and inclusive development (DCID) - Vol 27, No 4 (2016)

THOMAS, Maya
Ed
2016

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"Disability, CBR and Inclusive Development aim to enhance knowledge in the field of disability, addressing the needs of practitioners in the field (particularly those from developing countries), policy makers, disabled persons’ organizations and the scientific community. The journal encourages publication of information that is evidence-based, to improve current knowledge and programmes implementation, and will be openly and freely accessible to all readers" ”Published four times a year, previously published two times per year
Free

Developing human rights based indicators to support country monitoring of rehabilitation services and programmes for people with disabilities : a study protocol

SKEMPES, Dimitrios
BICKENBACH, Jerome
September 2015

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This paper seeks to develop a study protocol that can assess and improve the provision of rehabilitation services for people with disabilities across the world. The research targets a knowledge gap that exists whereby there are no indicators to reliable identify the performance of rehabilitation systems and monitoring technologies. The paper provides a detailed analysis of the issue before outlining and justifying a choice of methods for data collection and analysis, and the likely impact and use of the study results

BMC International Health and Human Rights, 15:25

Disability inclusive disaster risk reduction

DISABILITY INCLUSIVE DISASTER RISK REDUCTION NETWORK (DIDRRN)
2015

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This newsletter presents articles about disability inclusive disaster risk reduction research, workshops, projects, news, reflections and awareness-raising activities 

DIDRR News, Issue 3

Guardianship for young adults with disabilities as a violation of the purpose of the individuals with disabilities education improvement act

KANTER, Arlene S
2015

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“The Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEIA) was originally enacted in 1975 as the Education for All Handicapped Children’s Act. The purpose of the IDEIA is to “provide a free appropriate public education” to children with disabilities and to prepare them for further education, employment, and full participation in society. Under the IDEIA, all students are required to have a transition plan to facilitate their movement from high school to life after school. Although the transition planning process does not require parents to become guardians for their children with disabilities, many parents throughout the United States believe that becoming their adult child’s guardian is the next step in the transition process as their child reaches the age of majority. As a legal procedure, guardianship cedes decision-making authority from the young adult child to the parent just at the time in the young person’s life when he or she should be supported to exercise decision-making authority so as to live the most independent life possible. Further, schools, parents, and courts often fail to consider less restrictive alternatives to guardianship, such as supported decision-making, for those young adults who may need help in decision-making. Supported decision making has gained international attention recently due to the adoption of the UN Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities, which calls for support for people with disabilities rather than substituted decision-making, which is included in most guardianship laws. This article presents the view that guardianship as part of the transition planning process for young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities undermines the language and purpose of the IDEIA.”

 

Journal of International Aging Law & Policy, Vol. 8

Thematic study on the right of persons with disabilities to live independently and be included in the community : Report of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights

OFFICE OF THE UNITED NATIONS HIGH COMMISSIONER FOR HUMAN RIGHTS (UN OHCHR)
December 2014

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"The present study, developed under Human Rights Council resolution 25/20, is focused on the right to live independently and be included in the community, and the enjoyment, protection and promotion of that right as a substantive means for the realization of other rights, as a condition for avoiding institutionalization and segregation in health and social settings, and as a prerequisite to provide for the full development of the capabilities of persons with disabilities and their meaningful participation in, and contribution to, society"

Through our eyes

HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL
November 2014

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This video was made with children from Rwanda, Burundi and Kenya in 2014, in the context of a child participation activity within the “Ubuntu Care project: confronting sexual violence against children with disabilities in Rwanda, Burundi and Kenya”, implemented by the NGO Handicap International and its partners. The initiative brought disabled children together to start discussing their experiences and the cameras became an outlet for the children and members of the community to share their stories and raise awareness about important issues about confronting sexual violence against children with disabilities

Note: dialogue is in French with an option for English subtitles

Strengthening participation of children and young people with disability in advocacy

SIMMONS, Dr. Catharine
ROBINSON, Dr. Sally
October 2014

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Participation by children and young people in advocacy and change-making can not only improve and foster positive change in their own lives, but also influence the lives of others. When young people’s participation is supported, meaningful and engaged, multiple benefits accrue; their perspectives and experiences bring a unique contribution and can result in rights-based empowerment, enacted citizenship and improved relationships. This has the potential to shape policy, to increase the relevance and responsiveness of organisations they use, and to influence change in their communities in positive ways

 

However, there are significant issues and a range of barriers that discourage, prevent or actively exclude children and young people with disability from participating. A culture of low expectations, social and cultural barriers, relationship and identity difficulties and practical hurdles exist for many young people. As a result, many are precluded from participation, particularly around change-making activities

 

This paper examines how meaningful participation of children and young people with disability in advocacy and change-making can be strengthened. In the paper CDA calls for the promotion of children and young people’s participation as active and valued community members

 

This paper is also available at https://www.cyda.org.au/cda-issue-papers

 

Issue Papers

Disability inclusion in the Syrian refugee response in Lebanon : follow-up field visit summary

WOMEN'S REFUGEE COMMISSION
September 2014

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This summary describes the findings and next steps from the Women's Refugee Commission's third field visit to Lebanon in early 2014 conducted in partnership with the United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR) Lebanon. It provides recommendations to strengthen disability inclusion in community outreach and case management training or capacity development

Positive practices in disability inclusion : "we all have a role" : the valuable contributions of persons with disabilities in community outreach

WOMEN'S REFUGEE COMMISSION
United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR)
September 2014

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The Women's Refugee Commission identified and documented positive practices for disability inclusion in community center and outreach programming, in partnership with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and its partners in Lebanon. This article discusses the inclusion of people with disabilities in the Refugee Outreach Volunteer (ROV) network. ROVs are refugees who volunteer to provide insight into protection priorities, identify community-based solutions and refer refugees in need of urgent support

Positive practices in disability inclusion : "socialize, not stigmatize" : including children with disabilities in child-friendly spaces

WOMEN'S REFUGEE COMMISSION
International Medical Corps (IMC)
United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR)
September 2014

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The Women's Refugee Commission identified and documented positive practices for disability inclusion in community center and outreach programming, in partnership with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and its partners in Lebanon. Child-friendly spaces are being established at community centers, in order to provide access to a safe environment where children can access psychological support, and health and education initiatives. This article discusses how International Medical Corps is approaching the inclusion of children with disabilities in these child friendly spaces

 

 

Positive practices in disability inclusion : "it starts with building trust" : from outreach to the community center

WOMEN'S REFUGEE COMMISSION
INTERSOS
United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR)
September 2014

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The Women's Refugee Commission identified and documented positive practices for disability inclusion in community center and outreach programming, in partnership with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and its partners in Lebanon. This article discusses how INTERSOS have been using the expanding network of Refugee Outreach Volunteers (ROVs) and community centers to promote inclusion and access for people with disabilities and their families

Sendai statement to promote disability-inclusive disaster risk reduction for resilient, inclusive and equitable societies in Asia and the Pacific

REHABILITATION INTERNATIONAL
UNITED NATIONS ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL COMISSION ON ASIA AND THE PACIFIC
NIPPON FOUNDATION
April 2014

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This Statement documents attendees of the Asia Pacific Meeting on Disability-inclusive Disaster Risk Reduction’s joint understanding that “Disability inclusion in disaster risk reduction is critical for the creation of resilient, inclusive and equitable societies.” The state goes on to commit attendees to push for greater participation of men, women, and children alongside policymakers in the creation of new disaster risk reduction policy. The statement focuses on the Core messages; specific action for disability inclusion in disaster risk reduction; and strategic action for disability-inclusive disaster risk reduction in order to promote the inclusion of people with disabilities in the conversation regarding disaster risk reduction

Asia-Pacific Meeting on Disability-inclusive Disaster Risk Reduction: Changing Mindsets through Knowledge

22-23 April 2014

Sendai, Japan

Guidelines of disaster risk reduction : disability and disaster

GLOBAL ALLIANCE ON ACESSIBLE TECHNOLOGIES AND ENVIRONMENTS (GAATES)
ASIA DISASTER PREPAREDNESS CENTER (ADPC)
ASIA PACIFIC BROADCASTING UNION (ABU)
2014

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This report aims to raise awareness about inclusive policies, practices and disaster risk reduction strategies that address the accessibility of communication, shelter, transportation and early warning systems. The guidelines also hope to foster collaboration between disaster preparedness organizations, broadcasters and organizations of persons with disabilities to mainstreaming disability issues in disaster risk reduction strategies. These goals are achieved through discussion of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, inclusive disaster risk reduction, and concern for the inclusive nature of evacuation protocols for older people and people with disabilities, access to services, disaster risk reduction, and communication strategies

Empowering communities through knowledge transfer : training guide for community based rehabilitation

FERRANTE, Marco
2014

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This manual, along with the attached annex, presents useful information about community based rehabilitation (CBR) in Sudan. It is to be used as a practical tool for both existing CBR schemes and other communities that are looking forward to establishing CBR schemes. This document is divided into the following eight practical units:

 

1: Community Based Rehabilitation: Concepts and practical strategies

2: Community Based Rehabilitation and Social change

3: CBR & Education

4: CBR & Health

5: CBR & Livelihood

6: CBR & Employment

7: CBR & Management strategies

8: Training of trainers guide

 

The annex provides additional advice on the practical application of CBR theories and strategies in the context of Sudan

 

Note: OVCI gave copyright permission for this document to be uploaded and made publicly available on the Source website

Empowerment and participation : good practices from South & South-East Asia in disability inclusive disaster risk management

BOLTE, Patrick
MARR, Samadhi
SITOMPU, Dewi
et al
2014

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This report presents good practices showing examples of inclusion and active participation of persons with disabilities in disaster risk management. The paper is structured in three sections that illustrate general recommendations towards greater participation of persons with disabilities.

Section A provides the background on disability inclusive disaster risk management and reviews existing guidelines as to how the participation of people with disabilities in disaster risk management can be facilitated. 

Section B contains the actual good practices, structured in three separate chapters that illustrate general recommendations towards greater participation of persons with disabilities. Each practice highlights the involvement of individual persons as well as groups, describes the initial setting, the achievements, and the lessons learned from the practice. Each practice concludes with a box with key insights.

The final section C presents the key recommendations that can be drawn from the good practices and that are geared to inform future programming

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