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Characteristics of a safe and resilient community : community based disaster risk reduction study

ARUP INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT
September 2011

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"This research report on the Characteristics of a Safe and Resilient Community has been prepared by Arup’s International Development team (Arup ID) on behalf of the IFRC as part of a wider Community Based Disaster Risk Reduction (CBDRR) Study of the Tsunami Recovery Programme (TRP). Specifically, this report draws on the experience of the TRP CBDRR programmes and current literature in order to identify the characteristics of safe and resilient communities; to understand how these characteristics changed over time and how RCRC interventions have contributed to this change"

Community based disaster risk management (CBDRM) guidelines

PARIPURNO, Eko
et al
2011

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This set of guidelines is designed to help Community Based Disaster Risk Management (CBDRM) practitioners in building community resilience to disaster risk by coping with hazards and working around the issues of capacity and vulnerability. It is focused on building capacity in mobilising community collective resources in managing disaster risk instead of building their dependence on external support and assistance. The first half of the document details the importance of CBDRM, whilst the second explores the various tools at practitioners disposal (e.g. participatory research tools, facilitation methodologies and community organising strategies).

Footsteps issues 18-65

TEARFUND
2006

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Includes issues 18 - 65 of Footsteps, a newsletter with a Christian emphasis that is aimed at all health and development workers. It aims to share practical ideas and enthusiasm on all aspects of development that impact at community level, including health, sustainable agriculture, agro-forestry, literacy, the environment, and project management. Provides book reviews and resource guides

Mental health of populations exposed to biological and chemical weapons

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
2005

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"The mental and social health consequences of exposure to biological or chemical weapons require a public health strategy. Attacks with chemical and biological weapons are likely to be accompanied by acute fear, organic mental problems, psychological responses to somatic illnesses and injuries, and long-term development of medically unexplained symptoms. The paper outlines some early social interventions, followed by descriptions of early mental health interventions"

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