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Water justice, gender and disability : South Asian Water Studies (SAWAS), special issues, vol.5, no.4, June 2017

CLEMENT, Florian
NICOL, Alan
CORDIER, Sylvie
Eds
June 2017

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The papers in this volume on gender, persons with disabilities and WASH in South Asia help to provide important pointers on ways forward. A common thread throughout the four articles is that a constellation of challenges still exists, from 'exclusion' through prejudice at different levels, to institutional realities that render policy and other instruments ineffective in practice. In some cases, even, there remains a complete absence of key legal and policy instruments.  

Titles of the articles in this issue are: 

  • Planning for inclusion: exploring access to WASH for women and men with disabilities in Jaffna District, Sri Lanka
  • Breaking down Barriers: Gender and Disability in Access to Agricultural Water Management in Nepal
  • The Gender Gap between Water Management and Water Users: Evidence from Southwest Bangladesh​
  • Are policies enough to mainstream Gender in water and sanitation programs? Experiences from community managed drinking water supply schemes in India

Turning practice into policy : linking good practice community-based disaster risk management with government policy and practice

VENTON, Paul
FAILERO, Jessica
LA TROBE, Sarah
2007

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This report is to combine results that can then be used by civil society, governments and institutional donors to generate increased governmental support for Community-Based Disaster Risk Management (CBDRM). It is divided into two parts; the first identifies good practices in CBDRM, and the second focuses on the challenges in linking CBDRM with government policy and practice, and the methods to overcome them

Breaking barriers : building access for disabled people [whole issue]

WIRZ, Sheila
MEIKLE, Sheilah
Eds
May 2005

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This issue of id21 insights looks at barriers to disabled peoples' access to the physical environment, how they constrain economic and social opportunities and the importance of working with disabled people to dismantle them. The contributors also present good practices in a range of infrastructures, including transport, communication technologies and sanitation, that serve as examples of how disabled access can improve in developing countries. Articles include: Training Ethiopia's blind people in ICTs; Accessible water supply and sanitation; Creating disabled-friendly environments in Sri Lanka; Better access to public transport; Campaigning for access in Viet Nam; Including disabled people effectively in post-Tsunami planning

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