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Learning from experience: Guidelines for locally sourced and cost-effective strategies to modify existing household toilets and water access

WORLD VISION
CBM Australia
2018

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This learning resource is the result of a partnership between World Vision Australia and CBM Australia that aims to improve inclusion of people with disabilities in World Vision’s Water, Hygiene and Sanitation (WASH) initiatives, including in Sri Lanka. The guidelines are based on experiences and observations from World Vision’s implementation of the Rural Integrated WASH 3 (RIWASH 3) project in Jaffna District, Northern Province, funded by the Australian Government’s Civil Society WASH Fund 2. The four year project commenced in 2014. It aimed to improve the ability of WASH actors to sustain services, increase adoption of improved hygiene practices, and increase equitable use of water and sanitation facilities of target communities within 11 Grama Niladari Divisions (GNDs) in Jaffna District.

To support disability inclusion within the project, World Vision partnered with CBM Australia. CBM Australia has focused on building capacities of partners for disability
inclusion, fostering connections with local Disabled People’s Organisations, and providing technical guidance on disability inclusion within planned activities. World Vision also partnered with the Northern Province Consortium of the Organizations for the Differently Abled (NPCODA) for disability assessment, technical support and capacity building on inclusion of people with disabilities in the project.

HOME MODIFICATIONS FOR WASH ACCESS
This document is one of two developed in the Jaffna District and describes the strategies which were used to assist people with disabilities to access toilet and water facilities at their own home. The strategies were designed to be low cost and were developed using locally available materials and skills in the Jaffna District of Sri Lanka. Houses and toilet structures in the region were made of brick and concrete. No new toilets were built and modifications involved only minor work to existing household structures, water points and toilets.

NOTE:
The development of this learning resource was funded by the Australian Government's Civil Society WASH Fund 2.

Capturing the difference we make. Community-based rehabilitation indicators manual

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION
2015

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"WHO and the International Disability and Development Consortium (IDDC) have worked together to develop the indicators presented in this manual that capture the difference CBR makes in the lives of people with disabilities in the communities where it is implemented. This manual presents these (base and supplementary) indicators and provides simple guidance on collecting the data needed to inform them. The indicators have been developed to show the difference between people living with a disability and their families and those without disabilities in relation to the information reported in the indicators. This comparability provides valuable information to CBR managers, donors and government agencies alike, which can be used to guide decision-making, support advocacy and improve accountability. Further, the ability of the indicators to provide a comparison of the populations of persons with disability to persons without disability aligns with the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), which states that persons with disability have equal rights to those without disabilities." 

The evolution of community physiotherapy in India

RAJAN, Pavithra
February 2014

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Despite the urgent need for physiotherapy services for underprivileged communities, Community Physiotherapy is not a sought-after specialisation in India. Physiotherapists tend to serve in institutions rather than at community level, as a result of which this field of healthcare has stagnated. This article, based on an interview with one of the country’s eminent community physiotherapists, gives a first person account of the evolution of community physiotherapy in India and provides qualitative inputs to deal with the prevalent issues. While the need for services has increased, there has been no matching growth in the pool of physiotherapists willing to work in the community. Several recommendations have been made, including changes in approach to community physiotherapy by both physiotherapists as well as community organisations in India.

Common European guidelines on the transition from institutional to community based care|Guidance on implementing and supporting a sustained transition from institutional care to family-based and community-based alternatives for children, persons with dis

THE EUROPEAN EXPERT GROUP ON THE TRANSITION FROM INSTITUTIONAL TO COMMUNITY BASED CARE (EEG)
November 2012

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These guidelines "provide practical advice about how to make a sustained transition from institutional care to family-based and community based alternatives for individuals currently living in institutions and those living in the community, often without adequate support. The Guidelines are aimed primarily at policy and decision makers in the European Union and the neighbouring countries with responsibility for the provision of care and support services for children, people with disabilities and their families, people with mental health problems and older people"

Toolkit on the use of European Union funds for the transition from institutional to community based care

THE EUROPEAN EXPERT GROUP ON THE TRANSITION FROM INSTITUTIONAL TO COMMUNITY BASED CARE (EEG)
November 2012

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This toolkit "aims to explain how European Union funds can support national, regional and local authorities in designing and implementing structural reforms aimed at facilitating the development of quality family-based and community-based alternatives to institutional care. It addresses primarily the desk officers of the European Commission, managing authorities, intermediate bodies, monitoring committees and project promoters in the EU Member States and in acceding, candidate and potential candidate countries; and any other donors investing in services for children, people with disabilities, people with mental health problems or older people"

Community based rehabilitation (CBR)

STUBBS, Sue
2002

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This document contains personal reflections from the IDDC coordinator, Sue Stubbs on community-based rehabilitation. They are drawn from 10 years' experience working in the field of international disability and development

Children with hydrocephalus and spina bifida in East Africa : can family and community resources improve the odds?

MILES, M
2002

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Hydrocephalus and spina bifida are life threatening conditions that often result in severe dsabilities. Risks are much reduced by immediate surgery and careful managment, but neither has been available for most of the sub-Saharan African population. This paper traces the growth of solutions and some socio-cultural resources that historically have supported family and community care for children with severe disabilities, mainly in Tanzania, and nearby countries. Some community-based rehabilitation (CBR) work with children with spina bifida and hydrocephalus is described, and challenges to the CBR approach are noted from the increased survival of people with disabilities requiring complex care. More appropriate information, recognition of indigenous knowledge, enlistment of community resources and financial assistance are needed to enhance the lives of East Africans with hydrocephalus, spina bifida and other severely disabling conditions

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