Resources search

Routemapping culture and development : report on a pilot research project exploring the use of cultural approaches to development within five UK development agencies

GOULD, Helen
MARSH, Mary
2004

Expand view

This research highlights the inconsistent approach and limited explicit policy with reference to cultural activities in development, despite finding over 350 examples across five development agencies over two years. The study considers the different uses of culture in development, finding a lack of consistency in implementing projects, little understanding of how cultural processes work, and few examples of appropriate evaluation

Using research to inform health policy : barriers and strategies in developing countries

HENNINK, Monique
STEPHENSON, Rob
2004

Expand view

Looks at the uptake of health research into policy in four developing countries - Malawi, Tanzania, India and Pakistan. Identifies a range of barriers to effective dissemination and uptake of research results based on interviews with researchers, policy-makers and a range of stakeholders. Makes recommendations for donor support to developing country research capacity and greater involvement of practitioners and policy-makers in the south in research priorities and applications

The 10/90 report on health research 2003-2004

GLOBAL FORUM FOR HEALTH RESEARCH
2004

Expand view

This site contains up-to-date information on progress in helping correct the 10/90 gap in health research. It includes reports from 1999, 2000, 2001/2002 and 2003/2004. The most recent, the fourth since Global Forum for Health Research formed in 1998, covers progress in helping correct the 10/90 gap (that only ten per cent of health research funds are spent on 90 per cent of the world's problems) over the past two years. It focusses on health and health research as sound economic investments; priority setting in health research; progress in measuring the 10/90 gap; research capacity strengthening; information networks in health research; gender; the MDGs and health research; and networks in the priority research areas

RBM communications assessment : challenges and opportunities in Ghana, Mali, Senegal, Tanzania and Uganda

SHUFFELL, Sara
2004

Expand view

This report is from an assessment carried out between October 2002 and April 2003 in Ghana, Mali, Senegal, Tanzania and Uganda. It was part of a Roll Back Malaria Communications Assessment as an initial stage in the process to develop effective and inclusive national malaria communication strategies in RBM participating countries across Africa. It notes the challenges that are raised in the context of development communications in Africa: the absence of basic malaria communications strategies, poor visibility of National Malaria Control Programmes, and lack of regional coordination and information sharing to name a few. There are, however, many opportunities to develop better malaria communications listed in the report

Participatory communication strategy design : a handbook

MEFALOPULOS, Paolo
KAMLONGERA, Chris
2004

Expand view

This handbook on participatory communication strategy design (PCSD) has been prepared as a training and field guide for designing, implementing and managing communication for development strategies for field projects. The handbook focuses on the process of planning a communication strategy design in a participatory manner. It clearly explains the principles and processes of communication planning, message development, multimedia material production and the implementation of communication activities in the field. PCSD has been prepared primarily as training and reference material to be used during workshops for communication skills development, as well as a guide for participatory communication strategy design in the field

Involving the community : a guide to participatory development communication

BESSETTE, Guy
2004

Expand view

This manual argues that communication facilitates the development process. It conceptualises communication as interaction between and among the people whose development is being considered. In this way, communication becomes the development process itself, and the stakeholders - community members or their supporters who share an interest in the outcome - are development communicators as well. Using examples from environmental and natural resource management to illustrate participatory development communication, the manual is adaptable to other development areas, including health. It describes the root concepts of participatory development communication, a ten-step methodology for its application, and suggests communication tools appropriate to the approach. In an annex appended to the book, the author presents a summary of the changing perception of the relationship between the twin processes of communication and development. This adds a theoretical background to the material that gives it more depth for development researchers and practitioners for whom the book is intended, and will also be useful for development communication students

Liverpool school of tropical medicine : Malaria knowledge programme. Annual report 2003-2004 : reduction in the suffering by improving the management of malaria through better intervention and control of malaria.’

LIVERPOOL SCHOOL OF TROPICAL MEDICINE (LSTM)
2004

Expand view

The report shows the overall activities of the Malaria Knowledge Programme during 2003-2004. It initially outlines the research activities and the new knowledge outputs. Using a framework developed by Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine's Vulnerability and Health Alliance the report contains an evaluation of the implications and effects of the research findings on those most vulnerable to the effects of malaria

Promoting mental health : concepts - emerging evidence - practice, summary report... in collaboration with the Victorian Health Promotion Foundation and the University of Melbourne

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO). Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse
VICTORIAN HEALTH PROMOTION FOUNDATION, AUSTRALIA
2004

Expand view

This summary report and the full report on which it is based describe the concepts relating to promotion of mental health, the emerging evidence for effectiveness of interventions, and the public health policy and practice implications

Seeing in the dark

CURTIS, David
ALLEN, Simon
SOCIAL ASSISTANCE FOR THE REHABILITATION OF THE PHYSICALLY VULNERABLE, BANGLADESH (SARPV)
2004

Expand view

This paper is a reflection of the 'Seeing in the dark' project. It outlines the process, describes the installation, the project community and ownership, and evaluation tools used, and describes some significant outcomes. "‘Seeing in the dark’ was developed to respond to the challenge of finding new, innovative and appropriate advocacy tools for marginalised and vulnerable communities to strengthen their voice in their response to their own health and development needs. To explore the ways in which experiential understanding of disabilities can be developed, an approach that embraces working methods in both the arts and development was employed, resulting in the creation of an installation or interactive space"

New DFID research strategy : communications theme. Final report

DODSWORTH, Elizabeth
et al
December 2003

Expand view

Reviews the background and recommendations for the communication component of DFIDs new research strategy. Concludes that policy processes are complex and that research-based evidence is only one of the many competing influences on policy makers, development practitioners and end users. Outlines a number of gaps in flows of research information and how these may be addressed. Acknowledges the vital role of communication while also noting the importance of context and enabling environments in which the repackaging and circulation of information takes place and that intermediaries and networks are a vital part of this process. The political context and the complex relationships between people are key. Highlights a number of initiatives of European donors to strengthen southern research capacity and initiatives to facilitate knowledge and research sharing by a range of intermediary communication organisations

Appropriating the internet for social change : towards the strategic use of networked technologies by transnational civil society organizations

SURMAN, Mark
REILLY, Katherine
November 2003

Expand view

This research report argues that analysis of the Internet focuses too much on technology and on overcoming a "digital divide" in access to the Internet. The report looks at examples of how people in international civil society organisations have used e-mail, websites and databases to help them collaborate, publish information, mobilise people in their networks, and access information for research. The report does not cover local or national civil society organisations

Communication of research for poverty reduction : a literature review

HOVLAND, Ingie
October 2003

Expand view

This literature review maps current recommendations and emerging themes relevant to communicating research for poverty reduction. It draws on an annotated bibliography of over 100 documents produced by DFID and other development agencies, research institutes, academics and practitioners. It addresses the needs of different audiences, and identifies gaps in the literature around approaching communication as a systemic issue, improving the conditions under which reseach is communicated, facilitating user engagement in communication of research, at different levels, and investing in double-loop learning

Evaluation and utilization of traditional methods of communication in Cameroon's central, southern, eastern and extreme northern regions : case study 20

FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION (FAO). Communication for Development Group
August 2003

Expand view

This study's main objectives are to evaluate traditional means of communication; to note their constraints; to select the traditional methods which can best be used for the diffusion of information and to devise a strategy for implementing the selected method of traditional communication. The methodology of this survey is based on the Active Method of Participative Research.
The study illustrates that the traditional media for communication in Cameroon are: the gong and songs accompanied by dances (in all of the surveyed provinces); the xylophone (in the center and south); griot [travelling poet] and balafon (in the east); colleagues of the traditional chiefs (Lawanes, Djaoros); and messengers of traditional chiefs or muezzins (extreme north).There are numerous constraints to using individuals in devising communications strategies: a lack of trained musicians, the lack of initiative on the part of the village elders, the disinterest of the youth, conflict among the different generations, the proliferation of modern communications technologies, the complexity of training in various methods, the possible alteration of messages, a lack of motivation and the slow speed of transmission. The study notes that the best methods for the diffusion of information in the regions surveyed in Cameroon are: the gong, the colleagues and messengers of traditional chiefs to organize village meetings in which reproductive health issues could be raised, singing and dancing, travelling poets and xylophones.
In order to devise effective strategies for conveying messages about reproductive health through these traditional methods of communication, traditional authorities must be engaged early on in the process and informed of the importance of these means of communication; qualified individuals must be identified as resources and others trained; and a training of trainers must be conducted

Fifty years of development communication : what works

WAISBORD, Silvio
July 2003

Expand view

This presentation gives an overview of what works in participatory communication based on the experience of the past 50 years. It looks at an 'alphabet soup' of approaches in development communication, provides some definitions and discusses some common misconceptions about communication in development. There have been some changes in the practice of development communication which are noted. There are then some case studies looking at different interventions, followed by five key ideas on what works in development communication

Making information user-driven

LLOYD-LANEY, Megan
March 2003

Expand view

This brief document describes the issues and priorities involved in making information accessible. It explains that tailoring information to suit your audience increases the likelihood that your information will be accessed and taken up. To provide user-driven information it is important to understand who your target audience is, what information they want/need, how they access information and whether you are trying to inform or influence your audience. With this knowledge you can provide the information your target audience wants, in media they can use, and place your information where your audience will look for it. If you are clear about who has produced the information, who it is intended for and its purpose, the user can make informed decisions about the value of your information. Involving end users in research is also more likely to produce outputs that are quickly disseminated and taken up. Awareness of the strategic role of information within your organisation can be enhanced by encouraging all organisation members to become involved in identifying information needs, dissemination and community building

Advancing health communication : the PCS experience in the field

PIOTROW, Phyllis Tilson
et al
March 2003

Expand view

"This guide for health communication programs is based on the worldwide experience of the Population Communication Services (PCS4) project from 1995-2002... "This report is designed to help organizations carry out effective communication programs by addressing step-by-step some of the major problems likely to arise and by focusing on problem-solving in the rapidly changing field of health communication"

Resource centre manual : how to set up and manage a resource centre

O'SULLIVAN, Sheila
et al
2003

Expand view

Contains practical information on all aspects of setting up and managing a resource centre, from planning, fundraising and finding a suitable location, to collecting and organising materials, developing information services, and monitoring and evaluating the work of the resource centre. It assumes that most readers will use manual systems for organising information, but also explains how computers can be used in resource centres, including e-mail, Internet and databases. It describes how to select database software, and contains a detailed review of three leading database programs. It includes a list of organisations and publications that can provide further information

The gender guide for health communication programs

ZAMAN, Faria
UNDERWOOD, Carol
2003

Expand view

A simple step-by step guide to designing health communication programmes that take gender into account at the strategic design, materials development, implementation, monitoring and evaluation stages. Includes a short glossary and a number of short case-examples of gender-sensitive 'good practice' programmes from around the world

Tied up in a rope of sand. TFD : cultural action or development utility?

MAVROCORDATOS, Alex
2003

Expand view

Discusses the tension and synergy of culture and participatory development through examples of theatre for development experiences in Mali and Namibia. The author describes performances and processes for setting up performance activities in villages, some of which had their own forms of narrative drama, and others which developed these with external support. The article discusses the implications of importing and imposing cultural forms to achieve project goals, and contrasts this with the ethos of theatre for development, which seeks to engage community members in a dialogue with development workers in order to foster participation in and ownership of development activities

Missing the message? 20 years of learning from HIV/AIDS

SCALWAY, Thomas
2003

Expand view

This report focuses on the way in which the response to the HIV pandemic has been shaped, with a particular emphasis on the way in which communication has been used.
Often the emphasis is on information dissemination, and the distribution of health messages. While information is vital, past successes in fighting AIDS suggest that approaches need to be far broader than this. A politicised civil society, with communities able to take ownership of the response to HIV/AIDS, can catalyse extraordinary change and mobilisation. Similarly, a media able to support informed, inclusive debate will also be critical to future successes.
This report provides an overview of these issues, and suggests how the problems can begin to be addressed through work with policymakers, civil society and the media

Pages

E-bulletin