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Guidelines on best practice for persons living with deafblindness

ZWANENBURG, Aline
TESNI, Sian
June 2019

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These guidelines were developed to advance understanding of the needs and challenges of persons living with deafblindness and to promote their inclusion in society. The target audience are members of the CBM Federation with particular interest to, among others staff at Regional and Country Offices, Member Associations, co-workers, partners (including governments, education agencies, public and private service providers, and professionals), as well as persons living with deafblindness and their families.

 

Part One gives an overview of the impact deafblindness can have on an individual’s development and learning. It emphasises the need for a continuum of services and programmes, including early detection, referral, educational input, and family support.

 

Part Two outlines components of education and rehabilitation programmes. It provides guidelines on communication, holistic assessment procedures, assistive devices, advocacy and self-determination, transition planning, and discusses the importance of on-going regular access to health and therapeutic services.

 

Part Three considers how to improve and expand existing services through the provision of on-going personnel capacity building, and through networking with key stakeholders, to consider intersecting issues and service expansion. Each section includes an overview of the topic explored, some case studies and considerations for service implementation.

Services for people with communication disabilities in Uganda: supporting a new speech and language therapy professional

MARSHALL, Julie
WICKENDEN, Mary
2018

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Services for people with communication disability (PWCD), including speech and language therapists (SLTs), are scarce in countries of the global South. A SLT degree programme was established at Makerere University, Uganda, in 2008. In 2011, an innovative project was set up to provide in-service training and mentoring for graduates and staff of the programme. This paper describes the project and its evaluation over three years. Three types of input: direct training, face-to-face individual and group meetings, and remote mentoring, were provided to 26 participants and evaluated using written and verbal methods.

 

Disability and the Global South, 2018 Vol.5, No. 1, 1215-1233 

Employment outcomes of skills training in South Asian countries: An evidence summary

ILAVARASAN, P Vigneswara
KUMAR, Arpan K
ASWANI, Reema
November 2017

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This evidence summary of systematic reviews provides insights for policy makers surrounding the impact of training programmes on employment outcomes. There are 11 studies included in this summary focusing on technical and vocational education and training (TVET), rehabilitation and counselling, personality development (including leadership training, stress management and communication skills training) and entrepreneurship training programmes.

 

The target groups covered in the included studies are diverse including people with disabilities, health workers, women and enterprises as a whole. The final studies comprise of one study each from 2011 and 2017; two studies each from 2013, 2015 and 2016; and three studies from 2014. The focus of this evidence is on low and middle income South Asian countries namely: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka

A new way to measure child functioning

UNICEF
WASHINGTON GROUP
May 2017

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"In recognizing the need for a set of questions that would produce internationally comparable data on children, the Washington Group formed a subgroup in 2009 that is chaired by the National Statistical Office of Italy (ISTAT). UNICEF joined the subgroup in 2011.

The first main activity of the subgroup was the development of a short set of questions to reflect current thinking on child functioning for inclusion in censuses and surveys. The new module uses the ICF-CY as the conceptual framework and relies on a functional approach to measuring disability.

The Washington Group/UNICEF Module on Child Functioning, finalized in 2016, covers children between 2 and 17 years of age and assesses functional difficulties in different domains including hearing, vision, communication/comprehension, learning, mobility and emotions. To better reflect the degree of functional difficulty, each area is assessed against a rating scale. The purpose is to identify the subpopulation of children who are at greater risk than other children of the same age or who are experiencing limited participation in an unaccommodating environment. The set of questions is intended for use in national household surveys and censuses"

The module is being translated into multiple languages. Supporting documentation, including a concept note, tabulation plan, templates for reporting, guidelines for interviewers and training materials are also available.

Autism spectrum disorders

WORLD HEALTH ORGANISATION
April 2017

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This fact sheet provides key facts and an overview about autism spectrum disorders. Associated epidemiology, causes, assessment and management, social and economic impacts are briefly covered. The human rights of people with ASD are discussed and the WHO Resolution on autism spectrum disorders (WHA67.8) is introduced.

Disability, CBR and inclusive development : Volume 28, No.1, Spring 2017

2017

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Titles of research articles in this issue of the journal are:

  • Community Action Research in Disability (CARD): An inclusive research programme in Uganda
  • The Impact of Community-Based Rehabilitation in a Post-Conflict Environment of Sri Lanka
  • Communication Disability in Fiji: Community Cultural Beliefs and Attitudes
  • The Search for Successful Inclusion
  • Effect of Music Intervention on the Behaviour Disorders of Children with Intellectual Disability using Strategies from Applied Behaviour Analysis
  • The Effects of Severe Burns on Levels of Activity

 

"Out of the shadows" : a qualitative study of parents’ and professionals’ attitudes and beliefs about children with communication disability in Uganda and how best to help them

MCGEOWN, Julia
September 2012

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"Communication forms the basis of human life and the complex ways with which humans can communicate and interact with each other sets us apart from all other species. However, not all humans are able to communicate effectively due to a range of communication impairments. The overall aim of this study is to generate solutions and recommendations to remove any barriers preventing these children from communicating effectively and potentially to improve their quality of life"
Dissertation submitted in part fulfilment of the requirements for a Masters degree at the Centre for International Health and Development (CIHD) at University College London (UCL) Institute of Child Health (ICH)
The user has given permission for the uploaded document to be reproduced and made publicly available on the Source website

Breaking the silence : violence against children with disabilities in Africa

AFRICAN CHILD POLICY FORUM (ACPD)
2010

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This report highlights violence against children with disabilities in five study African countries: Cameroon, Ethiopia, Senegal, Uganda and Zambia. The report notes that there is widespread apathy and negligence at state, local and community levels, and highlights a lack of financial and medical aid, inadequate and inaccessible state facilities and systems, and insufficient community understanding. The study report documents the negative effect this has on children with disabilities and makes a number of recommendations to help improve the situation

Overview of health communication campaigns

THE HEALTH COMMUNICATION UNIT
March 2007

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This guide provides a hands-on 12-step process to developing health communication campaigns. Each chapter is created according to the steps, with information on what the step is, why it is important and what is required to carry it out

Documentation for change [whole issue]

March 2006

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This issue of LEISA is dedicated to documentation processes: how they contribute to the generation of new knowledge, and how they help people reflect on and improve their activities. This issue highlights examples of documentation in a range of field projects, and communication media from photography and participatory video to written case studies and oral testimonies or histories. The articles show how documentation can be done by anyone involved in a project, and can be more than just descriptive. Good documentation processes form part of wider monitoring and evaluation activities, and are essential for sharing knowledge and good practice with others

An analysis of reading errors of dyslexic readers in Hindi and English

GUPTA, Ashum
JAMAL, Gulgoona
2006

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[Authors' abstract] : The present study examined the nature of reading errors made by dyslexic readers in Hindi and English. A detailed analysis of error type showed 60% and 57% of phonological errors; 15% and 35% of orthographic errors; 25% and 7% of mixed errors; and 0.38% and 0.94% of unrelated errors in Hindi and English, respectively. Further, in both Hindi and English, the majority (65% & 69%, respectively) were the scaffolding errors, followed by the errors preserving the initial phoneme (22% & 23%, respectively), errors preserving the final phoneme (9% & 6%, respectively) and errors with orthographic overlap (4% & 2%, respectively). In Hindi, a far greater percentage of nonword (89%) than word (11%) errors was found, whereas in English, 54% of nonword and 46% of word errors was found. A significant correlation was found between reading accuracy in Hindi and in English. The findings are discussed in terms of linguistic interdependence hypothesis and orthographic transparency

Reporting on HIV/AIDS in Africa : a manual

BEAMISH, Julia
2006

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This manual includes chapters on: the role of the media; effective reporting - the basics; more on effective reporting; how can the story of HIV/AIDS in Africa become newsworthy?; professional standards of ethics and reporting; covering those affected by HIV/AIDS; the language of HIV/AIDS; sources of Information; finding new angles for reporting on HIV/AIDS; and, "selling" the story to editors

Multimedia training kit : AIDS reporting | Multimedia training kit

CLAYTON, Julie
2006

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This section of iTrainOnline's 'Multimedia training kit' (MMTK) is dedicated to reporting on HIV and AIDS. It consists of two units: the first, 'HIV/AIDS journalism and communication skills', aims to give participants the confidence and skills to communicate more effectively about HIV/AIDS research and other HIV/AIDS issues. The second, 'Finding and evaluating HIV/AIDS information on the internet', provides guidance on finding and evaluating the wide variety of HIV/AIDS information and resources available on the internet. Supplementary materials include a list of HIV-related email discussion forums, a glossary and a list of other HIV information sources

Working with the media : a guide for researchers

PANOS
2006

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"This guide has been designed to support strategic thinking on media engagement and to address researchers' need to act autonomously. "It offers step-by-step practical advice on working with different sections of the media, as well as considerations in developing a media strategy. The guide is predominantly aimed at UK staff but many of the points are relevant for researchers internationally"

Support for technical media in Iraq

BBC WORLD SERVICE TRUST
BRITISH COUNCIL
2004

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This booklet outlines 'Support for Technical Media in Iraq', a project designed and led by the British Council and the BBC World Service Trust. The project provided discussion and learning opportunities for media workers such as cameramen, sound engineers and lighting crews. The document discusses issues around the media sector in Iraq and the challenges ahead

Educate clients to communicate their needs to providers

POPULATION COUNCIL, Frontiers in Reproductive Health
January 2004

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This is a brief summary of the findings from the 'Smart Patient' intervention coordinated by Indonesia's National Family Planning Coordinating Board (BKKBN) and Johns Hopkins University, with support from Frontiers. Family planning clients were given a brief training session to improve their communication skills before seeing a service provider. The findings show that women agreed that coaching helped them to gain confidence, ask more questions and express their concerns. Providers were more likely to tailor information to individual needs. Eight months following the intervention, clients were more likely to continue to use a contraceptive method

Helping children who are deaf : family and community support for children who do not hear well

NIEMANN, Sandy
GREENSTEIN, Devorah
DAVID, Darlena
2004

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This book was written primarily for parents and other caregivers of young children. It provides a wealth of well-illustrated practical information. The book gives a thorough overview of the different ways to communicate with hearing impaired children. It is written in an easy-to-read style with lots of illustrations and examples from Southern countries.

Media tool for gender sensitive reporting on HIV/AIDS

CENTRE FOR ADVOCACY AND RESEARCH (CFAR)
POSITIVE WOMEN'S NETWORK (PWN)
UNIFEM
June 2003

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"This tool captures exchanges organized between representatives of the media, positive women's network and activists, on media response to HIV/AIDS, and how issues of concern to people living with HIV/AIDS, especially women, must be represented in mass media. It is meant for media practitioners, media and communications experts, groups involved in media advocacy, AIDS activists, networks of people living with HIV/AIDS, and others working on gender and HIV/AIDS"

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