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Article 11 of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD): legal frameworks guiding inclusive humanitarian action and guidance for CRPD reporting

GUZZI, Eleonora
May 2020

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The document aims to provide persons with disabilities, their representative organisations (OPDs) and other civil society organisations with practical support to analyse and report on the implementation of the rights of persons with disabilities in situations of risk and humanitarian emergencies (Article 11 of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities – CRPD). It also provides a horizon scanning of legal frameworks applying at international level, and other relevant reporting mechanisms.

 

There are three parts:

  1. An analysis of the legal frameworks guiding inclusive humanitarian action,
  2. A guide on the CRPD State reporting cycle for OPDs and civil society organizations
  3. A monitoring and analysis matrix on Article 11 of the CRPD

The unsteady path - Towards meaningful participation of Organisations of Persons with Disabilities in the implementation of the CRPD and SDGs. A pilot study by Bridging the Gap

COTE, Alexandre
April 2020

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This study, commissioned by the Bridge the Gap project, seeks to provide an overview of the situation in project’s partner countries (Burkina Faso, Ecuador, Ethiopia, Paraguay and Sudan) and to formulate recommendations to international cooperation actors on their possible contribution to strengthen meaningful participation of persons with disabilities in the implementation of the CRPD and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The study focused mostly on the interaction between governments and DPOs as intermediary bodies representing the diversity of persons with disabilities with the aims of ensuring their meaningful participation at national level.

 

The study combined a review of the literature and interviews with representatives of governments, OPDs, service providers, mainstream civil society organisations and development agencies across the 5 countries carried out between August and November 2019 to provide a multi stakeholders perspective on the participation of OPDs in CRPD. It also developed an analytical tool to collectively understand different forms of interaction and participation that could be further developed and used for further studies

Protection of civilians in armed conflict (S/2019/373) [EN/AR/RU]

UNHCR SECRETARY GENERAL
May 2019

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The present report is submitted pursuant to the request contained in the statement by the President of the Security Council of 21 September 2018 (S/PRST/2018/18). It also responds to the Council’s requests for reporting on the protection of medical care and on conflict and food insecurity, contained in resolutions 2286 (2016) and 2417 (2018), respectively. Section II provides a summary of achievements and challenges to the United Nations work on protecting civilians over the past 20 years. Section III reviews the current state of the protection of civilians and emphasizes the enduring relevance of the protection agenda 20 years on. Section IV focuses on the central challenge of enhancing respect for the law – the first of three protection priorities identified in the report of 2017 (S/2017/414) and discussed in the report of 2018 (S/2018/462) – with a particular focus on the conduct of hostilities. Section V discusses how the Council and Member States can rise to meet this challenge and, moreover, strengthen the practical impact of the protection agenda in the years ahead.

Access to Social Organisations, Utilisation of Civil Facilities and Participation in Empowerment Groups by People with Disabilities in Maharashtra, India

GOVINDASAMY, Karthikeyan
DHONDGE, Suresh
DUTTA, Ambarish
MENDIS, Tina
2019

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Purpose: This survey aimed to assess the baseline level of access to social institutions, utilisation of civil facilities and participation in empowerment schemes by people with disabilities in Amravati district of Maharashtra State, India.

 

Method: Sixty villages from two blocks in Amravati district were randomly selected for the survey. From these villages, 522 households were sampled and 3056 individuals were surveyed. Interviews were conducted with 590 individuals with disability from among the surveyed population. The structured interview schedule consisted of demographic data, access to social organisations, utilisation of civil services, and participation in empowerment schemes. 

 

Results: Locomotor disability was the most prevalent (44.6%) type of disability in the study area. Disabilities were more often present among male adolescents and young adults than among the older population and females. Over 50% of the study participants had no occupation (including children and students) and had not been to school. Only 48% had achieved secondary education and more. The proportion of disability among people belonging to Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes was considerably higher than among the general population. Access to social institutions was less than 50% for most of the items, and was even lower among females. Except for the ration card and Aadhar card, civil services were generally under-utilised by people with disability. Only 3.2% of the participants were members of self-help groups, and not a single person was a member of the Disabled People’s Organisation.

 

Conclusions:  In the study area access to social institutions, utilisation of civil services and participation in empowerment schemes was very low.

 

Limitations: Data, including general socio-demographic, access and utility data, was not collected for the general population but was limited to people with disabilities. This restricted the scope for comparison between people with and without disabilities.

 

 

Disability, CBR and Inclusive Development, Vol 30, No 1 (2019)

Diagnostic study on Disabled Peoples’ Organisations and National Union of Organisations of the Disabled in Liberia

DEEPAK, Sunil
HARRIS, Naomi
November 2018

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A diagnostic study was carried out by a consultant to the DASU project in collaboration with the national umbrella organisation “National Union of Organizations of the
Disabled” (NUOD) to assess the institutional capacities of Disabled Peoples’ Organizations (DPOs) in Liberia. The study involved DPOs from the national capital Monrovia and in three counties – Bong, Grand Gedeh and Nimba.
The study included an initial Desk Review, collection of case studies from the field and visits to the counties to meet the county DPOs. Following these, a workshop was organised
in Monrovia in which representatives of NUOD and the concerned DPOs took part. The workshop looked at the strengths and challenges faced by NUOD and DPOs, focusing on the skills needed for stronger and active DPO leadership.

Toolkit for DPOs Voluntary National Reviews

INTERNATIONAL DISABILITY ALLIANCE (IDA)
CBM
January 2018

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This toolkit was developed jointly by the International Disability Alliance (IDA) and CBM as an exploratory and interactive tool for organizations of persons with disabilities (DPOs) on the review and monitoring of the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) implementation, at national, regional and global levels. The toolkit aims to provide step-by-step guidance, ideas, suggestions and templates for building successful advocacy campaigns and strategies to participate in the monitoring mechanisms of the Sustainable Development Goals. This toolkit will build on the monitoring process called the Voluntary National Review (VNR) that takes place at the global level linked with national and regional components

Disability and HIV

UNAIDS
August 2017

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This report highlights existing key evidence on the relationship between disability and HIV. It discusses the concrete steps needed for a person-centred, disability-inclusive HIV response that allows for increased participation of people with disabilities and integrates rehabilitation within the continuum of HIV care. Globally, it is estimated that 1 billion people (15% of the world’s population) have a disability. Of those aged over 15 years, approximately 110–190 million (2.2–3.8%) experience significant disabilities. Disability is increasing in prevalence due to ageing populations, trauma, accidents and the increase in chronic health conditions, including HIV. Persistent discrimination against and exclusion of people with disabilities, in particular women and girls with disabilities, increases their vulnerability, including their risk of HIV infection.
 

The right to live independently and be included in the community : Addressing barriers to independent living across the globe

ANGLELOVA-MLADENOVA, Lilia
June 2017

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This reports looks at the main barriers to the realisation of disabled people’s right to live independently and be included in the community, which is set out in Article 19 of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). They are grouped in seven broad areas: (1) misunderstanding and misuse of key terms, (2) negative attitudes and stigma, (3) lack of support for families, (4) prevalence of institutional services, (5) barriers related to community support services, (6) barriers in mainstream services and facilities, and (7) barriers, concerning other CRPD provisions, with effect on Article 19. A set of recommendations is also provided, outlining measures required to address these barriers.

The recommendations in this report – presented below - were shared with the UN Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities when they were drafting the General Comment on Article 19. They can be used by governments and civil society organisations, alongside the General Comment, to identify actions needed to implement Article 191 CRPD.

 

Are national voluntary reviews promoting awareness and inclusion? : Perceptions survey on civil society and stakeholder engagement in voluntary national reviews and the implementation of the 2030 Agenda

COSTA, Naiara
LONG, Graham
LUXTON, Louise
May 2017

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"For the second year, Together 2030 has carried out a survey to collect evidence on stakeholder awareness of, and participation in, national planning and review around the 2030 Agenda. In 2017, the survey was conducted in partnership with the Newcastle University. The survey received 461 responses from a range of stakeholders, including national, regional and global organisations. This perceptions survey asked 20 questions in total (though not all questions were directed to all respondents). It was issued in three languages: English, Spanish and French, and was shared broadly with civil society and stakeholder mailing lists and via social media from March 3 to March 24 2017."

This report addresses two key questions about people’s participation in the 2030 agenda for sustainable development:

  • How extensive is stakeholder awareness of, and participation in, the process of country Voluntary National Reviews which are a central component of the High Level Political Forum
  • How aware and engaged is civil society and stakeholders across the world in national level planning and review of the SDGs?

This report presents statistical, survey-based evidence that helps to address these two questions. 

Making disability rights real in southeast Asia: Implementation of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in ASEAN

COGBURN, Derrick
KEMPIN REUTER, Tina
March 2017

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This edited collection evaluates national implementation of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) across all 10 countries of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) region. Working with interdisciplinary and country-specific research teams, the book presents case studies of CRPD implementation across Southeast Asia, including detailing the factors that influenced each country to ratify the CRPD; the focal point structure of implementation; the independent mechanism established to monitor implementation; and civil society organizations’ involvement.

The book also evaluates the implications of CRPD implementation for human rights and development in ASEAN, including the degree of institutionalized support for persons with disabilities; the development objectives of the CRPD against the strategic objectives of the ASEAN community; and the way these developments compare with those in other countries and regions

Human rights and disability: A manual for national human rights institutions

CROWTHER, Neil
QUINN, Gerard
REKAS, Abigail
March 2017

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(Updated Dec 2018)

This Manual is designed to provide practical guidance for national human rights institutions (NHRIs) that are actively working to advance the human rights of persons with disabilities, as well as those NHRIs that are seeking to strengthen their efforts in this area. This Manual provides practical guidance and recommendations about how the role and functions of NHRIs can be directed to provide better protection for persons with disabilities, to promote greater awareness and respect for their rights, and to monitor the progress made and obstacles encountered in advancing their rights.

There are three parts to the manual.

  • Part I: The concepts - the human rights framing of disability
  • Part II: The law - international human rights law and disability (CRPD and others)
  • Part III: The practice - what NHRIs can do to contribute to the process of change

 

 

Disability and HIV

UNAIDS
January 2017

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This report highlights existing key evidence on the relationship between disability and HIV. It discusses the concrete steps needed for a person-centred, disability-inclusive HIV response that allows for increased participation of people with disabilities and integrates rehabilitation within the continuum of HIV care.

AccountABILITY toolkit: a guide to using UN human rights mechanisms to advance the rights of women and girls with disabilities

PHILLIPS, Suzannah
et al
2017

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This toolkit seeks to empower women with disabilities and organizations working on their behalf to make use of the available U.N. human rights mechanisms to ensure that the human rights violations women with disabilities experience receive redress and to make sure that statements, recommendations, observations, and guidance from the U.N. incorporate an intersectional gender and disability rights perspective. 

Chapter 1 of this guide provides an introduction to the practice and procedures of the three main U.N. human rights mechanisms: treaty bodies, Special Procedures, and the Universal Periodic Review. 

Chapter 2 identifies the ways in which civil society can engage with the U.N. human rights system. This section provides an overview of when and how civil society can provide necessary information to the U.N. human rights bodies and the advantages and challenges of different types of engagement.

Chapter 3 provides guidance on developing advocacy strategies for successful U.N. engagement, looking in greater detail at the type of information that civil society should be providing to the U.N. This section also discusses collaboration with other organizations and strategies (including media strategies) for implementing U.N. standards at the national level

The Functions of Disabled People’s Organisations (DPOs) in Low and Middle-income Countries: a Literature Review

YOUNG, Rebekah
REEVE, Mathew
GRILLS, Nathan
December 2016

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Purpose: The aim of this study was to review peer-reviewed literature on the roles and functions of Disabled Peoples’ Organisations (DPOs) in low and middle-income countries, and their outputs and outcomes for people with disabilities.

Method: Online databases were searched without date or language limiters (Medline, CINAHL, Scopus, Embase and Cochrane), using a combination of two key word search strategies. Eleven studies were selected for inclusion in this review on the basis of predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Included studies underwent quality assessment using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme (CASP) and Downs and Black’asss criteria for quality assessment. Data for thematic analysis was then grouped under the broad themes of: participation and factors that facilitate participation; development of partnerships and connections; and self-development and self-help.

Results: There was some evidence within the included studies to suggest that DPOs can produce significant, positive outcomes for persons with disability in terms of factors such as employment rates, access to microfinance and bank loans, accessibility of housing, acquisition of orthopaedic devices, involvement in civil society, development of friendships and networks, and participation in training programmes. Although the studies under review largely did not investigate the long-term impact of the reported DPO functions and outputs, some of the short-term outputs may be considered proximal indicators of outcomes such as increased empowerment and well-being. Conclusion: The 11 studies in this review suggested that DPOs can be effective in achieving their stated aims of promoting well-being, participation and rights of people with disabilities in low and middle- income countries.
 

Together towards an inclusive world (series of videos to celebrate CRPD's 10th anniversary)

Australian Disability and Development Consortium
December 2016

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ADDC and ten of its members have produced a series of short videos featuring persons with disability who are, or were, engaged in a disability-inclusive development (DID) project or initiative (in Australia or overseas). In these videos they share their personal stories and how disability inclusive development projects changed their lives, benefitted their communities and contributed to a more inclusive society.

The video series was officially launched during a parliamentary event in Canberra on 30 November 2016 in the presence of some of the persons featuring in the videos and of senior politicians from different Australian political parties.

The event was opened by an address by Senator Concetta Fierravanti-Wells, Minister for International Development and the Pacific. In her speech, she confirmed both the Australian government’s and her personal strong commitment to ensuring that all Australian development programs are disability-inclusive and to championing DID internationally. You will find a transcript of the Minister’s speech here attached.​

10th anniversary of the adoption of Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) - UNDESA

UNDESA
December 2016

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This page was set-up on UNDESA webpage to commemorate the 10th anniversary of the Convention. It adresses the following issues:

- Background
- Events to commemorate CRPD+10 around the world
- Highlights of the 10 years since the adoption of the CRPD
- Main CRPD page
- CRPD 10 Anniversary Note (UN CRPD Secretariat, DSPD/DESA)
- Celebrating 10 Years of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (OHCHR)
- Call for submissions on inclusive development for persons with disabilities and the realization of their human rights

Disability, CBR and inclusive development (DCID), 2016, Vol. 27 No. 3

2016

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Titles of research articles in this issue of the journal are:

  • Exploring the Complexities of Leprosy-related Stigma and the Potential of a Socio-economic Intervention in a Public Health Context in Indonesia
  • Users’ Satisfaction with Prosthetic and Orthotic Assistive Devices in the Lao People’s Democratic Republic: A Cross-sectional Study
  • The Functions of Disabled People’s Organisations (DPOs) in Low and Middle-income Countries: A Literature Review
  • Physiotherapy Care for Adults with Paraplegia due to Traumatic Cause: A Review
  • Supporting Parents in Caring for Children with Disability in Ghana
  • Quality of Life among Persons with Paraplegic Spinal Cord Injury

Brief reports

  • Impact of Long-term Use of Adaptive Seating Device among Children with Cerebral Palsy and their Families in Mumbai, India: A feasibility study

Experiential Accounts

  • Community-Based Rehabilitation for Children with Intellectual Disability: A Case Study of Endosulfan Affected Areas in India

Statements from the 2016 Social Forum

OFFICE OF THE HIGH COMMISSONNER FOR HUMAN RIGHTS
October 2016

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The 2016 Social Forum took place from 3 to 5 October 2016 in Room XX, Palais des Nations, Geneva, Switzerland, in accordance with paragraph 6 of Human Rights Council resolution 29/19 entitled “The Social Forum.”

 

The Social Forum is an annual three-day meeting convened by the Human Rights Council. It is a unique space for open and interactive dialogue between civil society actors, representatives of Member States, and intergovernmental organizations, on a theme chosen by the Council each year.

 

The theme of the 2016 session of the Social Forum was the promotion and full and equal enjoyment of all human rights and fundamental freedoms by all persons with disabilities in the context of the tenth anniversary of the adoption of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD).

 

Among other human rights concerns, statistics show that around fifty per cent of persons with disabilities cannot afford appropriate health care; and they are more likely to be unemployed than persons without disabilities. Persons with disabilities have, on average, worse living conditions and less participation rates in public affairs than other groups. 

 

Realizing the right to development of persons with disabilities requires the adoption of a human rights-based approach to disability which respects their active, free and meaningful participation in development, the fair distribution of resulting benefits, and their inclusion in society on an equal basis with others. States parties to the CRPD have agreed to cooperate internationally, including through making development cooperation inclusive and accessible to persons with disabilities (Article 32 CRPD). The Social Forum provides an inclusive platform to continue moving the international human rights agenda in that direction. 

Participatory and emancipatory approach in disability research. Possible allies for supporting active citizenship, civil rights and actions of social innovation.

TRAINA, Ivan
August 2016

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Participatory and emancipatory approaches in disability research are addressed through three research questions related to: the extent the participatory approach can encourage an active citizenship paradigm for the involvement of disabled people; the extent emancipation through research can contribute to the affirmation of a civil rights model of disability; and the extent it is possible to consider these approaches as tools that can support the design and implementation of socially innovative actions. The paper considers the academic literature and a reviews international documents, assuming a disability perspective

Considering Disability Journal. DOI: 10.17774/CDJ12015.2.2057584

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