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Inclusive education. For inclusive schools where all children can learn

HUMANITY & INCLUSION (HI)
2020

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Following a short summary of factors limiting access to education for children with disabilities, Humanity & Inclusion (HI) work in inclusive education is briefly reported. HI's aims, main areas of activities (families and communities, making services inclusive (education, social, etc.) and developing policies) and ongoing projects are outlined. Examples of innovative practices and testimonies (from Mozambique, Gaza, Mali, Nepal and Sierra Leone) are given. The importance of inclusive education and HI's approach are discussed.

 

The unprecedented impact of COVID-19 on education systems worldwide and the HI #school4all campaign are also highlighted.  

TailfeatherTV

TailfeatherTV
2020

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TailfeatherTV has been co-written and is presented by young adults with learning disabilities especially for babies, toddlers and young children.

TailfeatherTV episodes each have a different theme and are presented in an App-Style format.

Viewers are taken into the 'main screen' to meet 5 lovable characters who represent a different fun area for children to explore: Dance, Sing, Sign, Learn, and Play....

Accuracy of school-based vision screening by teachers in Pakistan: A qualitative study

BECHANGE, STEVENS
January 2020

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Main objectives

1 – To explore the knowledge and competencies of teachers in carrying out visual acuity testing.

2 – To investigate how visual acuity testing practices were applied.

3 – To determine teachers’ motivations and attitudes towards carrying out school-based visual acuity testing.

Summary

Although the school-based vision screening programme was well received and supported by the schools and health providers, limited time allocated for training and practice; limited supervision and the lack of refresher training; trainers insufficiently experienced in training non-health staff and teachers’ involved had many other responsibilities and could not allocate sufficient time to conduct the activity properly which undermined the effectiveness and efficiency of the programme.

Disability Data Lab learning paper: a practical guide to disability data

JENKINSON, Astrid
et al
December 2019

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The Bond Disability and Development Group (DDG) has commissioned this learning paper to summarise discussions which took place at the DDG’s Data Lab workshop, held in London on 22 October 2019, and to be used as a reference document going forward. This first workshop focused on why organisations need to collect disability data; what tools are available and practical ways in which these can be used. This learning paper provides a summary of these discussions and can act as a guide and reference tool for organisations looking to be more inclusive in their programming, generally, and in their data collection practices, specifically. A number of case studies and numerous resource references are provided.

Leave No Woman Behind!

ANDREWS, Rebecca
MAKING IT WORK (MIW)
et al
November 2019

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Two advocacy tools associated with the new African Union (AU) Protocol to the Charter on Human and Peoples' Rights on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities have been developed: what is new for African women and girls with disabilities; and what is new for African children, youth and older people with disabilities. The new protocols are localised, progressive, intersectional and gender inclusive

 

The tools are available in short from (2 pages) or long form (4 pages) which provide details of the specific rights articles and definitions

 

Making It Work developed the new advocacy tool with COVAW, FIDA-Kenya and UDPK

 

 

How pain management for children with cerebral palsy in South African schools complies with up-to-date knowledge

JOHNSON, Ensa
NILSSON, Stefan
ADOLFSSON, Margareta
November 2019

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Background: Pain in children with cerebral palsy (CP) has its sources in musculoskeletal problems that can influence learning in a school setting. Best pain management is essential for these children, but school staff may not keep up to date with the latest developments and interventions. Therefore, staff’s perceptions of beneficial strategies may not comply with contemporary scientific knowledge about effective evidence-based interventions.

 

Objectives: This study investigated how pain management intervention for children with CP in South African schools complied with international scientific knowledge about evidence-based interventions. The intention was to provide support for an update of knowledge on both individual level (i.e. professionals) and system level (i.e. decision makers).

 

Method: Five focus groups were conducted with staff members at five schools for children with special educational needs in South Africa. Manifest and latent content analyses of professional statements identified interventions reported as beneficial and related them to higher and lower levels of intervention evidence as reported at the time of data collection.

 

Results: Most treatment strategies concerned motor functioning that fell within the framework of physiotherapists and occupational therapists. Access to orthopaedic expertise was limited, waiting times were long and medication for spasticity treatment was not offered.

 

Conclusion: A discrepancy between published evidence and clinical practice for pain management in children with CP in South African school settings was noted. Suggestions for improved early intervention to identify children’s hips at risk through surveillance programmes; and orthopaedic management are proposed to prevent deformities and unnecessary suffering in South African children with CP.

 

 

African Journal of Disability, Vol 8, 2019

Capability of deaf children with a cochlear implant

RIJKE, Wouter J
VERMEULEN, Anneke M
WENDRICK, Karine
MYLANUS, Emmanuel
LANGEREIS, Margreet C
VAN DER WILT, Gert Jan
November 2019

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Introduction: The main idea underlying this paper is that impairments such as deafness are particularly relevant to the extent that they lead to deprivation of capability. Likewise, the impact of healthcare services such as cochlear implants and subsequent rehabilitation can best be inferred from the extent that they protect or restore capability of those affected.

 

Methods: To explore children’s post-implant capabilities, we tested two newly developed digital, adaptive child self-report and parent-report questionnaires in 19 deaf children (aged 8–12 years) and their parents during rehabilitation, as well as in 23 age peers with normal hearing.

 

Results: Despite the impressive speech-language results that were recorded with cochlear implants, the post-implant capabilities of the deaf children we evaluated differed from those of their hearing peers, with the cochlear implant group appearing particularly disadvantaged in areas such as accessing information, communication, social participation, and participation in school.

 

Conclusion: Deaf children with cochlear implants who are performing well on linguistic and auditory tests can still experience serious limitations in desired functioning. Our findings suggest that a capability approach may reveal aspects of what is being achieved through rehabilitation that might otherwise remain unnoticed, and that could help to further improve the well-being of our patients.

Unimproved water sources and open defecation are associated with active trachoma in children in internally displaced persons camps in the Darfur States of Sudan

MACLEOD, C K
October 2019

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To estimate the proportion of children with trachomatous inflammation—follicular (TF) and adults with trachomatous trichiasis (TT) in internally displaced persons (IDP) camps in the Darfur States of Sudan and to evaluate associated risk factors. 

A random-effects hierarchical model was used to evaluate factors associated with TF and TT. Thirty-six IDP camps were represented in the survey data in which 1926 children aged 1–9 years were examined, of whom 38 (8%) had TF. Poor sanitation, younger age and living in a household that purchased water from a vendor were associated with TF in children aged 1–9 years.

 

Transactions of The Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. 2019 Oct 11;113(10):599-609

DOI:10.1093/trstmh/trz042

Children with hearing impairment in Malawi, a cohort study

MULWAFU, Wakisa
et al
October 2019

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The aim of this research was to assess the outcome of children with ear and hearing disorders 3 years after initial diagnosis, in terms of referral uptake, treatment received and satisfaction with this treatment. It also aimed to assess the social participation of the affected children, specifically, their ability to make friends and communicate needs, and their enrolment at school

752 children had been diagnosed in 2013 as having a hearing impairment and 307 (40.8%) children were traced for follow-up in 2016. 

 

Bulletin of the World Health Organization, Volume 97, Number 10, October 2019, 645-728

http://dx.doi.org/10.2471/BLT.18.226241

Estimating the intracluster correlation coefficient for trachomatous inflammation-follicular in population-based trachoma prevalence surveys: results from a meta-regression of 261 standardised pre-intervention surveys in Ethiopia, Mozambique, and Nigeria.

MACLEOD, Colin
et al
September 2019

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This study used a parametric bootstrap model to estimate intracluster correlation coefficient (ICC) for trachomatous inflammation-follicular (TF) in 1-9 year-olds, from 261 population-based trachoma prevalence surveys completed using standardised GTMP methodologies in Ethiopia, Mozambique, and Nigeria from 2012-2016.

Results from this study were used to draw up the most recent WHO 2018 recommendations on design effect (DE) estimates for sample size calculations for survey

 

American Journal of Epidemiology, 2019 Sep 11. pii: kwz196

doi: 10.1093/aje/kwz196

 

 

Operational adaptations of the trachoma pre-validation surveillance strategy employed in Ghana: successes and challenges

SENYONJO, Laura
et al
September 2019

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In 2009 Ghana began to design a trachoma pre-validation surveillance plan, based on then-current WHO recommendations. The plan aimed to identify active trachoma resurgence and identify and manage trichiasis cases, through both active and passive surveillance approaches. This paper outlines and reviews the adaptations made by Ghana between 2011 and 2016

Infectious Diseases of Poverty volume 8, Article number: 78 (2019)

Factors that relate to sport participation of adolescents with a mobility impairment

MOLL, Aletta M.
BESTER, Garfield
September 2019

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Background: There are multiple factors that make it difficult for learners with a mobility impairment to participate in sport, if not impossible. Unfortunately, it is not known which of these factors can be considered as the most important ones.

 

Objectives: The main objective was to obtain clarity on the factors that differentiate best between learners who participate in sport and those learners who are not participating.

 

Method: In total, 140 boys and girls with different types of mobility impairments participated. Information was obtained on inevitable factors such as age and gender, structure factors such as type of school and hostel dwelling and personal factors such as emotions and relationships with parents and peers.

 

Results: Four factors emerged that explained 22% of the variance in the distinctive characteristics of the group that participates in sport and the non-participating group. Age was the most important variable explaining 9% of the variance followed by trust (an emotional variable), gender and health.

 

Conclusion: Children with a mobility impairment should be encouraged to start participating in sport at an early age. Specific attention should be given to girls who are more reluctant to participate. Health is a factor that can inhibit sports participation; however, it should not be overemphasised. The emphasis should rather be on the development of trust, which will help adolescents with an impairment to take responsible risks in an adaptive sports environment.

 

 

African Journal of Disability, Vol 8, 2019

Experiences of primary caregivers of children with cerebral palsy across the trajectory of diagnoses in Ghana

KYEREMATENG, Joana D.A
EDUSEI, Anthony
DOGBE, Joslin A.
OPUKU, Maxwell P.
NKETSIA, William
HAMMOND, Chrales
AFRIYIE, Sally A.
September 2019

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Background: Cerebral palsy (CP) is a non-progressive disorder of posture or movement caused by a lesion to the developing brain that results in functional limitations. The diagnosis of CP can vary from one child to another, causing family stress because of vague and unknown outcomes of the disorder. Although there are negative attitudes in Ghanaian societies towards primary caregivers and children with disabilities, fewer attempts have been made to understand their experiences.

 

Objectives: The main aim of this study was to explore the experiences of primary caregivers across the trajectory of the diagnosis (before, during and after) of CP in the setting of a tertiary hospital.

 

Method: Using Social Capital Theory as framework, 40 primary caregivers of children with CP, who were receiving treatment at a major referral hospital in Ghana, were interviewed about their experiences before, during and after diagnosis.

 

Results: The results that emerged from the thematic analysis were discussed as follows: experiences before diagnosis, experiences during the diagnosis and experiences after the diagnosis. Particularly, participants discussed their inability to access essential services such as education for their children with CP.

 

Conclusion: In light of systemic challenges faced by participants and their children with CP, the need for health policymakers to prioritise the public education about CP, promoting the well-being of caregivers and other implications of the study have been discussed.

 

 

African Journal of Disability, Vol 8, 2019

Prevalence, identification, and interference of pain in young children with cerebral palsy: a population-based study

TEDROFF, Kristina
GYLLENSVARD, Mirja
LOWING, Kristina
September 2019

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Objective: To explore the presence of pain, how pain was addressed by physicians and parents, and how pain affected everyday life in young children with cerebral palsy (CP).

 

Methods: Children with CP, aged 5–10 years, participated in this cross-sectional study. Data were collected from medical records spanning a period of two years and by a standardized parental interview that included six structured questions and the Pain Interference Index.

 

Results: A total of 118 children, with a mean age of 7.4 years (SD 1.5), participated in the study. The parents of 81% of these children were interviewed. Pain was reported in 52% of the children, and pain was present at all severity levels. The prescription of analgesics was documented in 25% of these children’s medical records. Fifty-nine percent of the children with pain received analgesics from their parents. Pain restricted the children’s everyday lives particularly concerning sleep, school work and being with friends.

 

Conclusions: Half of this group of young children with CP were reported to have pain. Pain restricted the children's everyday lives and seemed to be under-treated. If pain can be addressed early, the children's everyday lives are likely to be improved.

Integrating face washing into a school-based, handwashing behavior change program to prevent trachoma in Turkana, Kenya

TIDWELL, James
et al
August 2019

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Trachoma is the leading infectious cause of blindness, and facial cleanliness has been associated with reduced odds of trachomatous inflammation and Chlamydia trachomatis infection.  This study reports on the results of a program integrating face washing into a school-based handwashing promotion program in Turkana County, Kenya

 

American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. 2019 Oct;101(4):767-773

doi: 10.4269/ajtmh.19-0205.

How do we ensure that children with disabilities are not bullied in school?

HUNT, Xanthe
August 2019

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Question & problem

Students with disabilities are bullied more often than their typically developing peers. Students in schools for children with disabilities may be victimized more often than students with disabilities in inclusive settings. Being bullied, which can take forms which are physical, verbal, indirect (relational, emotional, or social), and/or sexual, is associated with negative academic, social, and psychological outcomes for the victim. This evidence brief summarises what we know about how to prevent bullying of children with disabilities.

What works to improve educational outcomes of children with disabilities in school?

HUNT, Xanthe
August 2019

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Question & problem

For people with disabilities, a major determinant of social and economic outcomes in adulthood, is access to, and the adequacy of, education in childhood and adolescence. Yet, children with disabilities are less likely to be enrolled in, or complete, school. Further, there are substantial gaps in the evidence regarding what works to improve educational outcomes of children with disabilities in school. Educational outcomes, here include academic achievement, pass rates, and grade completion. Many studies measure child behaviour and proxy or distal outcomes in response to various interventions, but not actually how children with disabilities do in these domains. This is particularly the case in LMIC, where there is a dearth data about the effects of educational policies and practices on child educational outcomes.

How do we provide mental health support to children with psychosocial disabilities in school?

QURESH, Onaiza
August 2019

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Question & problem

It is estimated that approximately 10-20% of children, adolescents and young people (under the age of 18) worldwide have a disabling mental health condition. Approximately two-thirds of the global youth population goes to school for a significant proportion of the day. The idea of delivering mental health support in the setting has gained prominence as a way to increase the coverage and accessibility of mental health support for children. While there is a wealth of evidence around school mental health approaches in HIC, there is limited information with regards to their impact in low- and middle-income settings. This evidence brief explores what has worked for the delivery of school mental health initiatives in diverse settings, as well as evidence-based recommendations to strengthen them.

Therapy-related stress in parents of children with a physical disability: a specific concept within the construct of parental stress

BECKERS, Laura W M E
SMEETS, Rob J E M
VAN DER BURG, Jan J W
August 2019

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Purpose: The aim of this article is to conceptualise the phenomenon of therapy-related parental stress in parents of children with a physical disability.

 

Methods: Three models related to parental stress were reviewed, i.e., general parental stress, burden of caregiving in parents of children with physical disabilities, and experiences of these parents with their child’s therapy.

 

Results: The proposed definition of therapy-related parental stress is “the subjective stress and subsequent changes of functioning and health experienced by a parent of a child with a physical disability in response to paramedical therapies (i.e., physical, occupational, and/or speech and language therapy)”. A theoretical model is proposed to describe the process of therapy-related parental stress. Available questionnaires will most likely not be valid and responsive to capture the (changes in) stress parents experience related to therapy their child receives.

 

Conclusions: This article provides a first definition of therapy-related parental stress and a theoretical model to visualise the processes with regard to this topic. Empirical testing of the presented components and their coherence is needed to confirm or improve the model. A questionnaire that specifically measures the concept of therapy-related parental stress is needed, along with evaluating therapy-related parental stress in clinical practice and research.

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