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Child centred approaches to HIV and AIDS

SOURCE INTERNATIONAL INFORMATION SUPPORT CENTRE
2006

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This Key list highlights essential information resources on child centred approaches to HIV and AIDS. The resources in this key list are crosscutting in theme and explore the importance of young children’s participation in planning, implementing and evaluative processes. They attempt to address the question: "what can be done to include very young children in programming and policy responses in HIV and AIDS affected communities?" Although early childhood development programmes and resources are acknowledging the ability of young children to communicate and participate, methodologies to address issues of HIV and AIDS are few. Communication with children needs to take place, not only to inform processes of interventions that support them and their caregivers, but also to encourage openness around difficult subjects like HIV and AIDS status and death. This approach ensures attention to all children including those that can be excluded from policy such as nomadic children, children from religious and indigenous minorities or disabled children

Child rights : young children

SOURCE INTERNATIONAL INFORMATION SUPPORT CENTRE
2006

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This Key list highlights essential information resources on children's rights. The Convention on the Rights of the Child in 1989 was the first instrument to incorporate the complete range of international human rights, including civil, cultural, economic, political and social rights as well as aspects of humanitarian law. A general comment paper submitted to the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (UNHCR) maintains that early childhood is a critical period for the realisation of rights. Research highlights that the particular risks to young children are from malnutrition, disease, poverty, neglect, social exclusion and a range of other adversities. Proper prevention and intervention strategies during early childhood have the potential to impact positively on young children's current wellbeing and future development. Children’s participation is also an important element in enhancing children’s self esteem and confidence. All people, however young, are entitled to have their views respected and valued

Psychosocial support and counselling for young children affected by HIV and AIDS

SOURCE INTERNATIONAL INFORMATION SUPPORT CENTRE
2005

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This is a key list of essential information resources on psychosocial support and counselling for children affected by HIV and AIDS. Recognising psychosocial needs in young children affected by HIV and AIDS is relatively new. It refers to the psychological and emotional well-being of the child and the caregiver, including issues of self esteem, insights into adaptation to the new circumstances brought by the impact of HIV and AIDS, social functioning and social relationships. Psychosocial support is one way of increasing the capacities of young children and their caregivers to cope. Manuals and toolkits in this Key list seek to heighten critical awareness of the cultural and ethical issues associated with psychosocial work. They encourage people to think of locally used words and expressions and of how young children express themselves as social beings

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