Resources search

The wellbeing of children with developmental delay in Bangladesh, Bhutan, Laos, Nepal, Pakistan and Vietnam: An analysis of data from UNICEF’s Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys

EMERSON, Eric
SAVAGE, Amber
LLEWELLYN, Gwynnyth
December 2016

Expand view

This report, produced by the University of Sydney’s Centre for Disability Research and Policy (CDRP),
uses data collected in rounds four and five of UNICEF’s Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys programme (MICS) to describe the wellbeing of young children with and without developmental delay in six Asian countries. The United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) were used as a framework for identifying indicators of child wellbeing.

The report, authored by CDRP Disability and Inequity Stream Leader Professor Eric Emerson with Dr Amber Savage of the Family and Disability Studies Initiative, University of Alberta, Canada and CDRP Director Professor Gwynnyth Llewellyn, found that children with Developmental Delay in Bangladesh, Bhutan, Laos, Nepal, Pakistan and Vietnam are more likely than their peers to:
• Be living in poverty (SDG1). In five out the six countries children with developmental delay were more likely to be living in poverty than their peers
• Experience hunger (SDG2). In all six countries children with developmental delay were more likely to have experienced persistent severe hunger than their peers
• Suffer poor health (SDG3). On three indicators (poor peer relationships, diarrhoea and fever) children with developmental delay were more likely to have poor health than their peers. On three indicators (obesity, aggression and acute respiratory infections) there was no systematic difference between children with and without developmental delay.
• Experience barriers to quality education (SDG4). On all four indicators (attendance at early childhood education centre, family support for learning, access to learning materials in the home, maternal level of education) children with developmental delay were more disadvantaged than their peers.
• Experience barriers to clean water and sanitation (SDG6). On two indicators (improved sanitation, place to wash hands) children with developmental delay were more disadvantaged than their peers. On one indicator (improved drinking water) there was no systematic difference between children with and without developmental delay.

The authors noted that “Since the development of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC) in 1998, increased attention has been paid to monitoring the well-being of children. The UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD) and UNCRC both contain explicit provisions regarding the rights of children with disabilities. These impose obligations on governments to act to ensure that children with disabilities enjoy the same rights and opportunities as other children. In order to promote the visibility of children with disabilities, enable better policy, and monitor progress, disaggregation of data related to children’s well-being on the basis of disability is needed."

Human Rights

www.macao-tz.org
December 2014

Expand view

Malezi AIDS Care Awareness Organization (MACAO) is a non-profit organization reaching out to neglected Indigenous people in Ngorongoro District, Arusha Region of Northern Tanzania.  Macao founded in 2003, Macao is a humanitarian organization that provides assistance to approximately 200,000 Indigenous Maasai community in Ngorongoro district for addressing needs of water and sanitation, food security, health Care Research, Education, Research environment, Maasai Traditional Research, Human Rights and sustainable economic development by strengthening their livelihoods.  In addition to responding to major relief situations, MACAO focuses on long-term community development through over 4 Area Development Project. We welcome the donors and volunteers to join us in this programs, we are wolking in ruro villages.

Violating children's rights : harmful practices based on tradition, culture, religion or superstition

INTERNATIONAL NGO COUNCIL ON VIOLENCE AGAINST CHILDREN
October 2012

Expand view

"This short report is designed to complement other current activities in the UN system that are focusing on harmful practices and children and will hopefully lead to more effective action...The report first looks at the definition and scope of harmful traditional, cultural and religious practices violating children’s rights. Section 3 outlines the human rights context for their prohibition and elimination. Section 4 lists practices identified through a call for evidence issued by the International NGO Council earlier in 2012 and additional desk research. It also provides some examples of legal and other measures already taken to challenge and eliminate them. Section 5 provides recommendations for action by states, UN and UN-related agencies, INGOs, NGOs, national human rights institutions and others"
Briefing paper

Minimum standards for child protection in humanitarian action

THE CHILD PROTECTION WORKING GROUP (CPWG)
2012

Expand view

"These standards are intended for use by those working on child protection or related areas of humanitarian action...The Minimum Standards for Child Protection in Humanitarian Action follow the structure of the Sphere standards. Each standard is accompanied by key actions, measurements (including indicators and targets), and guidance notes. Child protection in emergencies includes specific activities by child protection actors, whether national or community-based, and/or by humanitarian staff supporting local capacities. It also includes activities in other humanitarian sectors. The Minimum Standards therefore contain 26 standards: (a) 6 general standards to address child protection needs (b) 8 standards to ensure a quality child protection response (c) 4 standards to develop adequate child protection strategies and (d) 8 standards to ensure mainstreaming of child protection in other sectors"

Standards for child protection : tool 1

KEEPING CHILDREN SAFE COALITION
2011

Expand view

"These standards can ensure that agencies develop practices that keep children safe from harm. They offer practical guidance to agencies on what they need to put in place to meet their responsibilities to protect children. They also provide a basis for determining local standards and how these will be met and measured. At the end of this document there is a useful tool for assessing and monitoring performance against the standards. These standards are Tool 1 of the Keeping Children Safe: Toolkit for Child Protection. The other supporting tools include a training pack, a guide on how to implement the standards and a DVD"

Finding online information for community-based promotion of reproductive and child health and rights|Compendium for training workshop for RCHR-network Jaipur, Rajasthan, India 12-14 February 2009

GARRETT, Martha J
2009

Expand view

This handbook aims to help workers in community based NGOs, working to increase demand for reproductive and child health services through increased awareness and advocacy, to develop their searching techniques when looking for information on the Internet. By knowing where to look for different types of information, how to find information on specific topics and for specific professional purposes; as well as by refining the search terms used, the relevance of the results can be improved and reduced to a manageable amount

Introduction to child protection in emergencies : an interagency modular training package|Child protection in emergencies training and resource CD : psychosocial module

CHILD PROTECTION WORKING GROUP (CPWG)
2009

Expand view

This document is the psychosocial module of the Introduction to Child Protection in Emergencies and Interagency Modular Training Package. This module is divided into the following sections:
Part 1 presents a background to psychosocial issues including the overall impact of emergencies on psychosocial well-being, psychosocial effects of emergencies on children, and legal framework and advocacy activities.
Part 2 intervention planning presents psychosocial programming principles and priority activities, and co-ordination and sector support.
Part 3 psychosocial programming presents addressing basic services and security developing community and family supports, focused supports, and referrals to specialised services
This comprehensive document will be of particular interest to NGOs, DPOs, international and national bodies and anyone else interested in child protection and psychosocial work with children and their families
Note: The core resources for this module are the Inter-Agency Standing Committee (IASC) Guidance on Mental Health and Psychosocial Support in Emergency Settings and the key interventions of the Sphere Handbook (2004) Standard for Mental and Social Aspects of Health

Our home is where the heart is : a young homemakers' guide

HOAEB, Aini N
LIYAMBULA, Aune S
STEINITZ, Lucy Y
July 2008

Expand view

This is a practical book for children and youth who are caring for others and managing a home. It is also intended as a guide for community caregivers, volunteers and relatives who oversee these households, and who voluntarily assist the children as much as possible

A guide to General Comment 7 : implementing child rights in early childhood

UNITED NATIONS COMMITTEE ON THE RIGHTS OF THE CHILD
UNITED NATIONS CHILDREN'S FUND
BERNARD VAN LEER FOUNDATION
Eds
2006

Expand view

The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child applies to all children under 18 - but its implementation poses particular practical challenges when it comes to young children. This book is a guide to implementing child rights in early childhood. It is based around the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child's General Comment no 7. It contains extracts from the papers submitted to the committee at the time of the Day of General Discussion which preceded the General Comment, and other relevant material

Nutrition and health [whole issue]

CHIN SECRETARIAT
Ed
May 2004

Expand view

This issue of CHIN News focuses on nutrition and health in India. Nutrition plays a key role in the physical, emotional and mental development of human beings. In mosts parts of the world, inequity, poverty, underdevelopment and unequal distribution and poor access to food and healthcare leads to severe impoverishment. The articles contained in this issue outline the challenges this poses, and policies and programmes that are attempting to address the challenges

Ensuring the rights of indigenous children

MILLER, Michael
February 2004

Expand view

This Digest details how the rights of indigenous children in both rural and urban areas are often compromised or denied. Specific areas of concern include the rights of indigenous children to survival and development, to good health, to education that respects their cultural identity, to protection from abuse, violence and exploitation, and participation in decision-making processes relevant to their lives. At the same time, however, indigenous children possess special resources as custodians of a multitude of cultures, languages, beliefs and knowledge systems. As this Digest discusses, the most effective initiatives to promote the rights of indigenous children build upon these very elements. Such initiatives recognize the inherent strength of indigenous communities, families and children, respect their dignity and give them full voice in all matters that affect them. The child age group in this report is from 0 - 18, with some areas that focus on early childhood development. For example, the right to birth registration, a name and nationality (p 9), or intercultural initiatives for safe childbirth in Peru (p 15)

State of the world's children 2005 : childhood under threat

UNITED NATIONS CHILDREN'S FUND (UNICEF)
2004

Expand view

The latest UNICEF report concentrates on the theme of the quality of a child’s life. There have been significant advances in the fulfillment of children’s rights to survival, health and education through the provision of essential goods and services, and a growing recognition of the need to create a protective environment to shield children from exploitation, abuse and violence since the Convention on the Rights of the Child was adopted by the UN General Assembly in 1989. Worryingly, however, in several regions and countries some of these gains appear in danger of reversal from three key threats: poverty, armed conflict and HIV/AIDS. The rights of over 1 billion children are violated because they are severely underserved of at least one or more of the basic goods and services required to survive, grow and develop. Swift and decisive action is required to reduce the poverty that children experience, protect them from armed conflict and support those orphaned or made vulnerable by HIV/AIDS

We the children : meeting the promises of the World Summit for Children

UNITED NATIONS CHILDREN'S FUND (UNICEF)
September 2001

Expand view

The report assesses progress to date in meeting the commitments made to the children around the world at the 1990 World Summit for Children. It also includes best practices and lessons learned, obstacles to progress, and a plan of action for building a world fit for children. It will be particularly useful to policy-makers, researchers, journalists and students as a reference tool and as an example of the progress that can be achieved through goal-oriented development planning

Inclusive early childhood care and development: a fair start for all children

EVANS, Judith
1998

Expand view

The Co-ordinators' Notebook, published by The Consultative Group on Early Childhood Care and Development, provides a synthesis of the most recent information on topics of interest to people concerned about the well-being of young children and their families. This issue focuses on inclusive early childhood care and development (ECCD) for children with special needs. It cateogorises these children into 3 different groups: (i) established risk -- those that are born 'differently-abled', (ii) biological risk -- those that have a physical problem at birth that can be remediated (eg low-birth weight babies) and (iii) environmental risk -- those that develop special needs because their environment does them harm (eg children living in poverty or from ethnic minorities that do not receive the same services available to other children in the country). The report offers a brief history of those who are differently-ables, then defines principles of programming for inclusive ECCD programmes, and finally looks at the next steps

World declaration on the survival, protection and development of children and plan of action for implementing the world declaration

UNITED NATIONS (UN)
1990

Expand view

This document was adopted during the world summit for children in September 1990. Led by 71 heads of state and government and 88 other senior officials, mostly at the ministerial level, the world summit adopted a declaration on the survival, protection and development of children and a plan of action for implementing the declaration in the 1990s. These documents contain outlined specific promises to promote the "optimal growth and development in childhood through measures to eradicate hunger, malnutrition and famine" and the plans to achieve this goal

Childwatch International Research Network

CHILDWATCH INTERNATIONAL

Expand view

This network seeks to strengthen child-centred research to contribute towards real improvement in children's well-being. It was founded in 1993 as a response from the research community to the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child. The Convention serves as a common agenda for research aimed at improving children's living conditions, well-being and participation. The aim of the website's Resources page is to compile lists of relevant links to child-centred research institutions, on-line research reports and journals, and bibliographies. The page is by no means complete, and the intention is to add links continuously. Also on the resources page are a selected number of child rights related links which are not primarily research based, but which could be helpful in research on children’s issues. A news section with relevant information is also available. There is also a list of well-working child rights related mailing lists

E-bulletin

Source e-bulletin on Disability and Inclusion

Subscribe to updates