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Mapping dialogue : a research project profiling dialogue tools and processes for social change

BOJER, Marianne Mille
MCKAY, Elaine
ROEHL, Heiko
April 2006

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This report profiles ten methods for facilitating dialogue. The approaches are diverse: some are designed for small groups, others for large numbers of people; some explore conflict while others are based on what is agreed. Part 1 looks at the foundations for, and approaches to, dialogue and offers some background on dialogue in traditional African culture. Part 2 maps out ten dialogue methods in depth and a number of others more briefly. Part 3 offers some ideas for how to assess what method to use in a given context

Inside voices : CBR workers stories

OKUNE, Joan
Ed
2006

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This book is an output from three CBR writing workshops held in Kenya, Tanzania and Malawi with the aim to facilitate the capacity of CBR workers to communicate their experiences thus increasing documentation of CBR practices in Africa. The book contains articles based on participants’ experience of CBR and is useful to anyone interested in CBR experiences in Kenya, Tanzania and Malawi

ICTs and the fight against HIV/AIDS in India : the SAATHII experience

RAMAKRISHNAN, L
January 2005

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This article explores the work of SAATHII - Solidarity and Action Against the HIV Infection in India - a non-profit organisation launched in 2000 to facilitate dialogue among the diverse sectors involved in the fight against HIV/AIDS in India. The author reports on the organisation's use of various ICTs to provide information in a range of ways to activists, volunteers, NGO programme personnel, funders and policy makers, and also examines the lessons learned so far

Building bridges with SIPAA : lessons from an African response to HIV and AIDS

DUNN, Alison
HEALTHLINK WORLDWIDE
2005

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This document examines the key lessons from the Support to the International Partnership against AIDS in Africa (SIPAA) programme implemented between 2001 and 2005 in nine African countries. The programme's main focus was on African leadership and ownership, involvement and participation of people living with or affected by HIV and AIDS and mobilisation of national and regional partners. Lessons learned include: meaningful involvement of people living with HIV and AIDS; supporting associations according to potential rather than proven track record; networks support; support for local leaders; making connections through National AIDS Councils; building strong partnerships; sharing information and knowledge across Africa; making the most of African skills and resources

Sharing knowledge for community development and transformation : a handbook|[Sharing knowledge handbook 2]

MCHOMBU, Kingo J
August 2004

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This handbook addresses the information needs of rural communities in Africa and explores the relationship between knowledge and development, and how community information resource centres can contribute to and can spark community development. It provides guidance for establishing community information centres and for ensuring their sustainability. The second edition includes several case studies from Ethiopia, draws out lessons learned, and includes a special section on HIV and AIDS resource centres. Each chapter concludes with suggested discussion questions for community groups

Sustainable ICT

May 2004

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This website was created as part of a DFID-funded research programme on sustainability factors in ICT for development projects. It presents a diverse range of case studies of programmes attempting to use information and commuication technologies as an integrated component of development programming, addressing economic, social and institutional sustainability. A brief description and the key objectives are provided for each, with a link through to each of the actual studies. The website also includes links to the research report, which provides useful analysis

Revisiting the "magic box" : case studies in local appropriation of information and communication technologies (ICTs)

BATCHELOR, Simon
O’FARRELL, Clare
2003

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This book looks at the way communities and groups in developing countries are appropriating information and communication technologies (ICTs) to address their needs. It finds that ICTs are being integrated into wider community-based activities and adapted to fit different contexts. It follows on from the paper "Discovering the Magic Box". It finds that there are still few examples of community-driven and locally appropriated ICT initiatives and an absence of standards or guidelines to evaluate ICT-based projects. The book includes some analytical frameworks and indicators to identify good practice and evidence of impact A significant development has been in the growth of telecommunications, in particular mobile phones, that are relatively cheap and powerful tools for poor communities, even in remote areas. The book concludes that the power of oral communication through telephones and radio cannot be underestimated. The book proposes that the main challenge is to adapt the new, usually computer-based ICTs to the needs of poor, predominantly oral-based communities so that they can be appropriated effectively and quickly

Understanding the indigenous knowledge and information systems of pastoralists in Eritrea

DINUCCI, Alessandro
FRE, Zeremariam
2003

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This case study explores pastoralists' traditional natural resources mangement practices and their sources and channels of information. It aims to contribute to the development of demand-led extension and advisory services for nomadic herders in Eritrea, on the premise that sustainable development programming builds on indigenous systems of communication and information diffusion

The significance of information and communication technologies for reducing poverty

MARKER, Phil
MCNAMARA, Kerry
WALLACE, Lindsay
January 2002

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A study for DFID staff, and for policy consideration, about the role of ICT in development. Identifies and assess the links between information and poverty, and concludes that although spreading ICT ('bridging the digital divide') should not be an end in itself, there is enormous potential for ICTs to increase information flow and empower poor people. The study then discusses the potential role of the international community, and sets out specific recommendations for DFID. Includes several appendices containing: a bibliography; brief case studies of Chile, Costa Rica and India; and list of related DFID funded projects. The study concludes that ICT should not be viewed as an end itself but has the potential as a tool to increase information flows and empower people. It can play a part in achieving International Development Goals

Information and communication technologies [whole issue]

UNITED NATIONS NON-GOVERNMENTAL LIAISON SERVICE (UN-NGLS)
Ed
December 2000

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Discusses the 'digital divide' between rich and poor countries, and how this affects African NGOs: their internal communications; networking with other organisations; ICT initiatives and their effect on local and institutional processes; priorities and challenges posed by ICTs; possible advantages and disadvantages. Primarily around Internet and electronic communications; also includes one article on the use of video in participatory rural appraisal

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